A government that works hand in glove with the creative industry

The government in Singapore is a firm backer of creative agencies – from attractive grants to working together to setting up centres of excellence – it has not shied away from broadcasting this fact.

Agencies too are happy. For them, the experience of working with the Singapore government is devoid of the usual hang-ups associated with the civil service, such as being slow or bureaucratic.

So is Singapore creative? Industry watchers believe it is. According to an industry insider, “Singaporeans were more traditional; creativity was not a preferred choice but rather something you pursued if you ‘failed’ to make it in the mainstream. The government is doing its best to push creativity by welcoming cultural, social and political diversity.”

That said, there is work being done to develop the key industries that drive creativity as well as spur innovation, most prominently from startups. And most of it is visible.

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Honor 6 Play With 3020mAh Battery, 8-Megapixel Camera Launched: Price, Specifications

Honor 6 Play With 3020mAh Battery, 8-Megapixel Camera Launched: Price, Specifications

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The smartphone comes with a 5-inch HD display
  • It packs 2GB of RAM
  • The handset comes with MediaTek MT6737T SoC

Apart from launching its V9 Play smartphone, HuaweiTerminal brand Honor has also launched its affordable segment Honor 6 Play smartphone with 4G VoLTE support and a 3020mAh battery in China. The new smartphone from Honor has been priced by the company at CNY 599 (roughly Rs. 5,900) and will be made available for purchase in the country from Thursday.

The dual-SIM Honor 6 Play runs EMUI 4.1 on top of Android 6.0 Marshmallow out-of-the box. The handset sports a 5-inch HD (720×1280 pixels) display with a pixel density of 294ppi. The smartphone is powered by a quad-core MediaTek MT6737T SoC clocked at 1.4GHz coupled with 2GB of RAM. In terms of optics, the Honor 6 Play comes with an 8-megapixel rear camera with f/2.0 aperture. At front, the smartphone bears a 5-megapixel shooter with f/2.4 aperture for taking selfies.

The Honor 6 Play comes with 16GB of built-in storage, which is expandable via microSD card (up to 128GB).In terms of connectivity, the handset offers options including 4G LTE connectivity, Bluetooth 4.0, USB 2.0, GPS, and Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n options. The sensors on board include accelerometer, ambient light sensor, and proximity sensor. The handset measures 143.8x72x8.85mm and weighs 150 grams.

To recall, the recently launched Honor V9 Play runs EMUI 5.1 based on Android 7.0 Nougat and supports a hybrid dual-SIM slot (Nano + Nano/ microSD). The smartphone features a 5.2-inch HD (720×1280 pixels) display. It is powered by the MediaTek MT6750 octa-core SoC paired with 3GB or 4GB of RAM and Mali T860 GPU. Internal storage is at 32GB with the option to expand further available as well using the hybrid microSD card slot (up to 128GB).

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Huawei Honor 6 Play

Huawei Honor 6 Play

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

5.00-inch

Processor

1.4GHz quad-core

Front Camera

5-megapixel

Resolution

720×1280 pixels

RAM

2GB

OS

Android 6.0

Storage

16GB

Rear Camera

8-megapixel

Battery Capacity

3020mAh

Also See
  • Huawei Honor 6 (Black, 16GB) – OFFER
    Rs.11,900
  • Huawei Honor 6 (White, 16GB) – OFFER
    Rs.13,299
  • Huawei Honor 6 Plus (Black, 32GB RAM) – OFFER
    Rs.26,499

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Uber Being Probed by FBI Over ‘Hell’ Software to Interfere With Rivals

Uber Being Probed by FBI Over 'Hell' Software to Interfere With Rivals

HIGHLIGHTS

  • FBI is looking into Uber’s illegal competition intefering software
  • Uber’s software was being used to track the Lyft drivers
  • The investigation is being led by the FBI’s New York office

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is probing to see if Uber Technologies had used software to illegally interfere with its competitors, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday.

The investigation is focusing on Uber’s program that could track drivers working for rival service Lyft, the WSJ said, citing people familiar with the investigation.

The investigation is being led by the FBI’s New York office and the Manhattan US attorney’s office, the Journal said.

Separately, Uber will cease using diesel cars in London by the end of 2019 and the vast majority of rides will be in electric or hybrid vehicles by then, the taxi app said on Friday.

At the moment the company says around half of all the journey miles completed in the British capital are undertaken with greener vehicles on the firm’s standard low-cost UberX service, which lets customers book journeys on their smartphone.

Several carmakers have announced plans in recent months to electrify a large proportion of their new cars, with Volvo becoming the first major carmaker to set a date for phasing out vehicles powered solely by the internal combustion engine.

Britain will ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2040, replicating plans by France and cities such as Madrid, Mexico City and Athens.

Uber, which has about 40,000 London drivers, will only offer electric or hybrid models on UberX by the turn of the decade and plans to do the same by 2022 nationwide.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Apps to Provide Peace of Mind With a Teenager Behind the Wheel

Q. I have a new teenage driver in the family. What’s the best way to keep tabs on his whereabouts when he is out with the car? Will regular location-tracking phone apps work?

A. As long as you and the teenage driver agree to use a location-tracking app on your phones, the software should give you an idea of where he is at any given moment. Several apps and services for monitoring location through a smartphone can be found online. But keep in mind that you may not get the latest updates if the teenager loses his phone, its battery runs out or a network signal is unavailable.

Some location-tracking services include features specifically for keeping tabs on young drivers. For example, Life 360’s Driver Protect for Android and iOS is one option in this category and includes roadside assistance, a “Safe Drive Review” report for parents to see where the driver went (and how fast), arrival alerts, crash detection and emergency response tools. A Driver Protect subscription is $7.99 a monthbut comes with a free seven-day trial.

Photo

The Life360 Driver Protect app, one of several subscription services that track drivers, guides a new user through setting up a “circle” for family members to see one another on a map. Once configured, the app collects GPS and other data from the driver’s phone to show location, route and other information. Credit The New York Times

For parents who do not want to rely solely on information collected from the phone, a number of companies make vehicle-monitoring kits that use a small gadget that plugs into the car’s onboard diagnostics (OBD-II) port, usually found under the dashboard. Through its companion smartphone app, the device reports the car’s location, speed, braking information, driving history and more. You need to buy the OBD-II adapter (typically less than $80) and pay a monthly subscription fee. Prices vary based on the company, but Bouncie, Hum and MotoSafety are three car-tracking products to consider.

Newer vehicles may have optional tracking tools and custom apps available, so check your car’s user manual if you think these may be available. If the car already has the OnStar vehicle-safety service, you can add its FamilyLink monitoring feature for $3.99 a month.

Welcoming a new motorist into the family these days involves more than just driver’s education classes and adding the teenager to the insurance policy. Distracted driving incidents from texting or fiddling with other technology in the car are dangers that most older generations of drivers did not experience. The National Safety Council has information and app suggestions online for reducing distracted driving. Additionally, the council’s DriveItHome.org site hosts a series of detailed guides for parents of new driver

Even for parents who opt for less electronic surveillance of their teenage drivers, there is software to suggest for the new driver. Apps for the family’s insurance company, navigational aids and roadside-assistance tools can provide help when needed and minimize that invasive feeling.