Upcoming Cars In 2018

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If you thought 2017 was an exciting year for the automotive industry, well you’ll be surprised at what 2018 has to offer. The year is going to start off with a bang with a whole bunch of launches coming out way as we gear up for the Auto Expo. Of course, the rest of the year has more in stored. We take a look at what cars to expect in 2018 so that you can start saving for your favourite car right away.

Here’s A List Of All The Cars That Will Launch In 2018

Lamborghini Urus

lamborghini urus

The Urus is the fastest most powerful SUV in the world

Just 38 days after its global reveal, Lamborghini will launch the SUV in India on January 11. The Urus straddles the worlds of the SUV, coupé-crossover, sports car and even the luxury car. It’s the fastest SUV in the world and can go from 0 to 100 kilomteres per hour in just 3.6 seconds and reaches a top speed of 305 kmph. We expect it to be priced above ₹ 3.5 crore.

Launch: January 11, 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 3.5 crore

Audi Q5

2018 audi q5

The Audi Q5 looks better than before with the chiseled look

The new generation of the Q5 will hit the Indian shores on January 18 and it gets an updated look and sharper features. The Q5 also comes with a beefy front bumper with large air intakes for increased airflow. We expect the Q5 to come with the 2 litre diesel motor and the petrol too will soon follow. The 2018 Audi Q5 is based on the flexible MLB Evo platform and mimics the design of the larger Q7.

Also Read: New-Gen Audi Q5 Launch Details Out

The new SUV is lighter by a good 100 kg over the predecessor and has also grown in dimensions sporting a longer wheelbase and height. The design is sharper with cleaner lines on the Q5. There’s the new single-frame grille with Matrix LED headlamps and a sporty bonnet. The rear sports LED taillights, a roof mounted spoiler and a new bumper with a rear diffuser. The Q5 will rival the likes of the Volvo XC60, Mercedes-Benz GLC, Lexus NX 300h.

Launch: January 18, 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 50 lakh- ₹ 60 lakh

Datsun redi-GO AMT

datsun redi go 1l review

The AMT will only be available with the powerful 1-litre engine

Datsun will launch the automated manual transmission variant of the redi-GOin january and this will add to the variant line-up of the car. We’ll see no cosmetic changes as such and the AMT will be the same as the one in the Kwid. It will all come down to how the gearbox has been calibrated to the engine. We expect it to be pricier by 25 to 30 thousand rupees than the current 1 litre variant.

Launch: January 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 4 lakh

New Generation Maruti Suzuki Swift

maruti suzuki swift hybrid

The new Swift is lighter and more agile than before

It’s the most anticipated of launches in India and Maruti Suzuki is all set to usher in the new generation of the Swift with much fanfare. The new generation of the Swift is based on the all-new HEARTECT platform, which is lighter and more rigid than the current version. We don’t expect any changes in terms of the engines on offer, but the 1 litre boosterjet will see the addition of an RS model which will be sportier and more powerful.

Also Read: 2018 Maruti Suzuki Swift Hybrid Spotted In India

We expect it to be made available in both manual transmission and an AMT right from its launch. Maruti Suzuki will showcase the car at the Auto Expo and will launch the car soon after.

Expected Launch: February 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 5.5 lakh – ₹ 7.5 lakh

 

Mahindra MPV

mahindra mpv spy

The Mahindra MPV will be a 7 seater

Mahindra has had a good run with its MPVs, especially the Xylo, but it’s time to move on. The new MPV will be a seven seater and is likely to get a monocoque construction. While it’s still too early for us to give you any more details, we expect the car to launch by March 2018.

Expected Launch: March 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 8 lakh onwards

Lexus LS 500h

lexus ls 500h

The LS 500h will be the fourth hybrid car from Lexus in India

Lexus will introduce its flagship sedan, the LS 500h,  in a single hybrid form. The BMW 7-series and Mercedes-Benz S-class competitor will come powered by a 3.5-litre V6 petrol engine and two electric motors that make a combined 354hp. Power is channeled through an e-CVT transmission, and for India, it’ll only be offered in rear-wheel-drive form. Expect prices to be upwards of Rs 1.5 crore

Launch: January 15, 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 1.5 crore

Mercedes-Benz S-Class Facelift

mercedes benz s class facelift

The Mercedes-Benz S-Class facelift still is the benchmark in its segment

Mercedes-Benz will be launching the S-Class facelift in February 2018 during the Auto Expo. The company’s flagship model is produced at the Chakan facility in Pune which is the only plant outside of Europe that produces the S-Class. The new S-Class in India will have a range of new inline 6-cylinder petrol and diesel engines along with a range topping twin-turbo V8. The car has been thoroughly updated on the inside and gets a new, larger touchscreen infotainment system and also is more luxurious. How do we know this? Well, we’ve driven it of course! We expect prices to breach the ₹ 1 crore mark.

Expected Launch: February 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 1 crore onwards

Volvo XC40

volvo xc40

The Volvo XC40 is based on the new CMA platform

Volvo will launch its most affordable and smallest SUV in India by mid-2018. XC40 is the first model on Volvo Cars’ new Compact Modular Architecture which will underpin all other upcoming cars in the 40 Series, including fully electrified vehicles. The XC40 will go up against the likes of the Audi Q3 and the BMW X1. In terms of safety, the Volvo XC40 gets pedestrian, cyclist, vehicle and large animal detection with emergency autobrake, Pilot Assist and Run-off Road protection.

Also Read: All You Need To Know About The Volvo XC40

It also gets wireless QI mobile phone charging and Bluetooth connectivity, 9-inch Sensus Connect touchscreen and a dedicated cell phone storage space. From the start the XC40 will be available with a D4 diesel or a T5 petrol four-cylinder Drive-E powertrain. Further powertrain options, including a hybridised as well as a pure electric version, will be added later. The XC40 will also be the first Volvo model to be available with Volvo’s new 3-cylinder engine.

Expected Launch: Mid-2018

Expected Price: ₹ 45 lakh

 

Hyundai Santro

2018 hyundai santro spied

The Santro will go up against the likes of the Tiago, Celerio, Kwid and redi-GO

Hyundai is gearing up to revive the Santro nameplate with an all-new car. There is a chance that we’ll see the car at the 2018 Auto Expo in February and a launch soon after. Upon launch, it will rival the likes of Maruti Suzuki Celerio, Renault Kwid, and Tata Tiago. We expect to see a 0.8-litre and 1.0-litre engine options, possibly the same petrol mills that the i10 used to offer. Transmission duties to be carried out by a 5-Speed manual gearbox and Hyundai might also consider offering an AMT option, seeing the growing demand for an automatic option in entry-level cars in India.

Expected Launch: Mid-2018

Expected Price: ₹ 4 lakh – ₹ 6 lakh

Ford Figo/Aspire Facelift

ford figo facelift

The Ford Figo and Aspire will get subtle updates this year

The Ford Figo hatchback and Aspire sub-compact sedan are due for a mid-life cycle in 2018. Ford India is already testing the updated models that will get design tweaks along with an updated cabin. Expect to see a new touchscreen infotainment system; while making its way under the hood will be the newly developed 1.5-litre petrol engine from the EcoSport facelift. The 1.5 litre TDCI diesel will continue to do duty on the models.

Expected Launch: March 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 5 lakh – ₹ 8 lakh

New Generation Honda Amaze

honda amaze privilege edition

The Amaze will sport a wider and roomier cabin along with updated features

Honda plans to launch six models over the next three years, and will kick-star this line-up with the second generation Amaze. The sub-compact sedan will receive a complete revamp and will be a lot more premium and upmarket. The new Amaze will sport a wider and roomier cabin, along with new equipment and better quality materials. The new generation Amaze will continue with the same platform while the 1.2 -litre petrol and 1.5 litre diesel engines will see revisions for more power and fuel economy.

Expected Launch: Second half 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 6 lakh – ₹ 8 lakh

BMW M5

2018 bmw m5 review

The M5 will come to India as a CBU

BMW will bring its performance-spec M5 super sedan to India in 2018. The sedan will be launched at the 2018 Auto Expo and will be the range-topping version of the 5 Series to go on sale. The sixth generation BMW M5 is powered by a 4.4 litre bi-turbo V8 engine that produces about 600 bhp and 750 Nm of peak torque, and is the first M5 to get all-wheel drive. Arriving as a CBU, the M5 will cost north of 1 crore rupees in India.

Expected Launch: February 2018

Expected Price: ₹ 1 crore onwards

Hyundai i20 Facelift

hyundai i20 facelift face

The Hyundai i20 will come with design tweaks to match the company’s global design language

Hyundai has been testing the i20 facelift for a while now, and the updated premium hatchback will go on sale in 2018. The refreshed model will get styling tweaks in-line with Hyundai’s global design language, and will sport a larger grille, revised headlamps and tweaked taillights. The cabin too will get updates including a touchscreen system with connectivity options like Apple Carplay and android auto. Engine options will remain the same on the i20 facelift, albeit with better fuel efficiency.

Expected Launch: Mid-2018

Expected Price: ₹ 5.5 lakh – 8.5 lakh

[“Source-ndtv”]

This Is the Gear You Need to View the Upcoming Solar Eclipse

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It’s tempting to stare at the sun during a solar eclipse, but if you try to do so without protection, you could damage your eyes. This image of a partial eclipse in 2012 was taken by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. (Courtesy of NASA/SDO and the AIA, EVE, and HMI science teams)

On August 21, North America will experience the first total solar eclipse visible across the continent in nearly a century–and, while it may seem illogical, this period of semi-darkness is an important time to practice sun safety.

That’s because while during an eclipse, you won’t want to tear your eyes away from the show, staring directly at the sun can lead to solar retinopathy, a condition where light floods the eye’s retina. In 1999, 45 patients visited an eye clinic in Leicester, England, after viewing a solar eclipse without proper eyewear. About half of the patients suffered from eye pain; the others reported impaired vision. Although these eclipse watchers were not totally blinded, several incurred long-term damage.

The United States hasn’t experienced a total eclipse since 1979, and that one only passed over a small swath of the Northwest. This year, in contrast more than 500 million people in North America, plus parts of South America and northwestern Europe, will be able to see at least a partial eclipse. Those within a 70-mile wide pathbetween Oregon and South Carolina will witness a total eclipse.

A partial eclipse occurs when the moon blocks part of the sun from view. A total eclipse, in contrast, is when the moon completely blocks the sun. “Totality,” the part of the total eclipse when the sun is completely covered, lasts only around two minutes.

Most people in the continental United States live within a one- to two-day drive of the total eclipse’s path. Madhulika Guhathakurta, the lead program scientist for NASA’s “Living With a Star” initiative, says the breadth of the path makes the eclipse accessible to everyone. She says observing a total eclipse is transformative: “It’s akin to the way astronauts describe their first trip to space. You’re just so in awe of nature.”

To view the solar eclipse, you’ll need proper equipment. It may seem odd to don protection in the semi-darkness of a partial eclipse, but staring at the sun can cause retinal injury. The only time it’s safe to look at the sun without protection is during totality. Keep your equipment on hand, and put it back on when the sun starts to reappear.

Opt for gear featuring ISO-approved solar filters, which are about 100,000 times darker than everyday sunglasses. The American Astronomical Society’s website includes a list of manufacturers that have certified their products meet the ISO 12312-2 standard. If you purchase equipment from other outlets, double check that their merchandise meets ISO standards.

Whether you’re a stargazing neophyte or dedicated astronomer, this gear will help you make the most of a spectacular event.

These solar viewers give 2x magnification and protection from the sun during the partial eclipse.
These solar viewers give 2x magnification and protection from the sun during the partial eclipse. (Celestron)

Eclipse glasses and handheld viewers

Eclipse glasses look like hybrids of 3-D movie glasses and sunglasses. As Guhathakurta explains, these glasses have the added protection of a solar filter. Whereas sunglasses only block UV rays, eclipse glasses also cut off visible light.

If you’re a casual observer or part of a large group, you’ll like these glasses’ low prices and bulk packaging. You can buy a pack of five paper glasses from Rainbow Symphony for around $12. If you want a sturdier option, try these plastic glasses from American Paper Optics. And feel free to go for style: TSE17 has a $5.05 stars-and-stripes five-pack, and American Paper Optics features everything from Bill Nye glasses to astronaut-themed frames.

Looking for something between basic glasses and high-tech binoculars? Check out this handheld viewer from Celestron. For $9.95, you’ll receive two viewers with 2x magnification capabilities and a pocket eclipse guide.

Binoculars and telescopes

Binoculars and telescopes are pricier than eclipse glasses and handheld viewers but can be worth the investment. They feature a higher magnification, but higher magnification results in a shakier image––as power increases, the equipment becomes more sensitive to its holder’s small hand movements.

Binoculars are rated with two numbers. The first number is the magnification, the second is the aperture—the diameter of the front lens, measured in millimeters. If you’re buying a pair of binoculars and plan to use them for other astronomy viewing, the bigger the aperture, the better, but bigger lenses also mean heavier equipment.

The following options offer a range of viewing strengths. Celestron’s EclipSmart binoculars feature non-removable solar filters, so you’ll only be able to use them for solar viewing. A 10×25 pair (10x magnification and 25mm aperture) costs around $35, while a 10×42 pair costs just about twice as much. A cheaper option is Lunt’s mini SUNocular. A 6×30 pair costs $29.95.

If you prefer binoculars with removable solar filters, Meade has a $69.99 10×50 pair that works for both solar viewing and nighttime stargazing. Once you remove the solar filters, the binoculars will operate like a normal pair.

Telescopes offer some of the best eclipse views, but you’ll pay more for added detail if you want an advanced model. A basic lightweight option is the Explore Scientific Sun Catcher 70mm telescope. It costs $59.99 and can be used during both the day and night. A more advanced option is the $99.95 Celestron EclipSmart telescope. It offers 18x magnification, 50mm aperture and non-removable solar filters.

Another choice is the Meade EclipseView telescope. The cheapest model is a $79.99 82mm reflecting telescope designed for on-the-go use. A sturdier long-term bet is the 76mm reflecting telescope, which costs $129.99. Both models feature removable solar filters and are suitable for solar and nighttime use.

The Meade EclipseView 82mm telescope is designed to be portable, for eclipse watching anywhere.
The Meade EclipseView 82mm telescope is designed to be portable, for eclipse watching anywhere. (Meade)

Add-on solar filters

Another category of eclipse viewing gear is add-on filters. These can be attached to binoculars, telescopes and cameras not originally designed for solar viewing and are mainly used by experienced observers. Similarly to eclipse-specific gear, add-on filters prevent retinal damage. They also protect your equipment’s optics from the heat of the sun, as the intensity of an eclipse can damage gear designed for nighttime observing.

Filters are typically made of metal on glass (sturdy but most expensive), aluminized polyester film (also known as Mylar) or black polymer (also used in eclipse glasses). Rainbow Symphony sells black polymer and silver Mylar filters starting at $19.95. Thousand Oaks Optical and Orion offer higher-end filters ranging in price from $22 to $150-plus.

Pinhole projectors

If you want to view the eclipse without spending money on special equipment, you’re in luck. Stand with your back to the sun, and use your hands, a hole-punched index card or even a patch of leaves to create a tiny opening. As sunlight flows through the empty space, an image of the sun will project onto a nearby surface. For more detailed instructions, visit the American Astronomical Society’s pinhole projection page.

Guhathakurta’s final words of advice are simple: During the partial eclipse, “do not look at the sun without glasses on, but absolutely look at the total solar eclipse without glasses on. These are two binary events. When you wear glasses and you cannot see anything anymore, that’s totality.”

[“Source-smithsonianmag”]