It’s time we educated children for the future, rather than limiting them to subjects of the past

virtual reality

In March, the House of Lords told us what has long been obvious: that we need to pay far more attention to the internet by coordinating our efforts towards improving children’s “digital literacy”.

A report, published by the Lords Communications Committee, states that students’ lives – “from health to education, from socialising to entertainment” – are now “mediated through technology”.

It also suggests that the best way to protect children online is through mandatory content control filters and privacy settings, and that a new children’s “digital tsar” should be appointed.

All of this is commendable and, like so many education initiatives, long overdue. But if we are going to teach children to use the internet properly we need to do more than controlling its ‘threats’.

Whether we like it or not, artificial intelligence, algorithms, advances in genetic engineering, nanotechnology and biology are already shaping our world at a pace we can scarcely comprehend. Rather than adding another ‘subject’, we should be looking at the whole purpose of education and asking whether our current systems are still fit for purpose.

For generations now we have viewed children as either tabula rasa, blank slates waiting to be filled with knowledge, or, as those who adhere to innatism maintain, minds brimming with knowledge from day one.

Both philosophies fed into the assembly line pedagogy, funneling talent into the narrow and restricted neck of an hourglass, to prepare them for world of work and leisure. What is increasingly evident, however, is that this approach is inadequate, even for those leaving school in the next decade.

Yes, by all means, let us give the internet a far more prominent place in our curriculum (although I doubt whether including it as part of the many-headed beast that is PSHE is the right place), and better still, embed it across the curriculum.

But let’s look further, much further, at what we are teaching, and its relevance over the next decade. We need to ask: should we even continue to teach the “3 R’s” in their conventional form.

In his recent TED talk “The Future of Learning”, education guru Sam Chaltain said that we “have to prepare our children for their future opposed to our past”. And that, clearly, is the challenge we face.

While we know change is coming (and the J curve for knowledge is likely to be with us by 2030), we do not appear to have a unified approach on how to prepare for it. Instead of being reactive, education has to become proactive, even predictive, looking beyond what we already know to a rapidly changing future.

As Yuval Noah Harari notes in his book ‘ Homo Deus’ , a report prepared in 2013 by Oxford researchers Frey and Osborne revealed that up to 47 per cent of current US jobs risk being replaced by computers and automation in the next 20 years – including doctors and pharmacists.

While we remain sceptical as to whether humans can really be replaced in such professions, we should take note of the pharmacy that opened in San Franciso in 2011. Providing two million prescriptions in its first year without a single mistake, this new high-tech pharmacy owes its success to the specialised algorithms and iPhones which now run the show.

Bletchley Park to house college for teenage codebreakers

01:27

As many occupations disappear altogether, in the same way that streaming has decimated video and music stores, new professions will undoubtedly surface, but it is likely they will require more flexibility and creativity than our current education system allows.

Artificial intelligence and algorithms are already playing a significant role in our day to day lives, so it will be no surprise when teachers also become surplus to requirements.

Meanwhile, we are so hung up on data that we are wasting huge amounts of human potential, squeezing the creativity out of young minds.  Looking forwards, the workforce of tomorrow will not be judged on their content knowledge, but rather a set of skills and dispositions which enables them to thrive in an economy that is changing, fast.

Recently I was visited by a friend who was New Zealand’s entrepreneur of the year in 2016. When I asked him about the quality of his new and prospective employees, he said his greatest concerns were their inability to problem-solve, their lack of imagination and the analytical skills to address causes rather than just managing the effects.

Sadly there is little in our education system that prepares children for employment now – let alone in 2040, when the world of work will be more complicated still.

So while we may welcome the paper from the House of Lords on internet safety, even accepting that it is reactive rather than pro-active, it is a small step on a very long journey. We know we cannot keep adding to an already full and essentially backward-looking curriculum.

If the students are to succeed in the future, we need to begin considering how we can best teach new competencies, new skills, new applications and new knowledge.

And that starts by acknowledging that today’s education system is still stuck in the past.

[“source-ndtv”]

Ross Barkley has been more creative than Eden Hazard, David Silva and Alexis Sanchez this season

Whatever your thoughts are on the PFA Team of the Year – and most of those thoughts might simply be “where’s Toby Alderweireld?” – you are bound to think that some players were unfortunate to miss out.

But one of those names probably isn’t Ross Barkley .

The Everton midfielder’s efforts over 2016/17 have pretty much mirrored those of his team . He’s occasionally been very good, but just seems to lack the consistency required to kick on and be considered among the very best.

Or does he?

Just looking to create another chance (Photo: Rex Features)
No wonder he’s happy about it (Photo: Jan Kruger)

Because a look at Opta’s chances created stats would suggest that Barkley has outperformed a number of the Premier League’s so-called brighter stars in one key area – his ability to create chances.

In fact, only Tottenham’s Christian Eriksen and Manchester City’s Kevin De Bruyne have created more than him in the division this season.

Here’s the top 10:

Chances created in the Premier League this season

Christian EriksenKevin De BruyneRoss BarkleyDimitri PayetDavid SilvaAlexis SanchezRoberto FirminoMesut OzilGylfi SigurdssonEden Hazard020406080100

So the Blues and sometime England midfielder sits above the likes of Eden Hazard, David Silva, Alexis Sanchez and Mesut Ozil, while Everton fans will be happy to see him above Liverpool duo Roberto Firmino and Philippe Coutinho, who sits 13th.

Enough to suggest that Barkley should have found a place in the Team of the Year?

Maybe not, but he’s certainly a much more intelligent player than some give him credit for…

[Source:-Mirror]

LG G6 Dust and Water Resistance Teased; Will Sport Battery Larger Than 3200mAh

LG G6 Dust and Water Resistance Teased; Will Sport Battery Larger Than 3200mAh

LG G6 Dust and Water Resistance Teased; Will Sport Battery Larger Than 3200mAh
HIGHLIGHTS
New LG G6 teaser touts water and dust proof capability
LG G6 to pack over 3200mAh battery
The smartphone will be unveiled at an event on February 26
LG has shared another teaser for the G6 flagship smartphone which promotes water and dust proof feature. The new teaser is part of the company’s several teasers that have surfaced on the Internet in past few weeks promoting several features like reliability, integration of an AI assistant on the flagship, and a ‘big screen that fits’.

The latest teaser has been shared with Pocketnow and says “resist more under pressure” which seemingly confirms water and dust proof capability on the LG G6. The teaser image also has a tagline that says “witness the next-generation smartphone brought to you first by LG.” Based on initial leaks and official teasers released by LG, the G6 flagship is widely expected to come with IP68 certification. Though, the new teaser may point to something related to “extra-durable build,” points out Pockenow.

Separately, a South Korean report has claimed that LG G6 will pack a large capacity battery which will be over 15 percent more capacity than the previous LG G5. The report quotes a senior LG executive who said, “The G6 is equipped with a high capacity battery of more than 3200mAh.” The LG G5 came with a 2800mAh battery which was comparatively smaller than 3000mAh on the LG G4.
LG recently announced ‘Preliminary Experiment Group’ for select users in South Korea. Under the company’s group, limited users will receive the G6 later this month ‘free of cost.’ We will have to wait till LG’s February 26 event to see what the company has in stores for consumers.

LG’s G6 flagship smartphone will be unveiled at the company’s February 26 event which will begin at 4.30pm IST (12.00pm CET).

Tags: MWC, MWC 2017, LG, LG Mobiles, LG G6, LG G6 Specifications, QDAC

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

New Samsung Chip Could Make Your Phone Faster Than Your Laptop

Samsung is set to make mobile devices bigger, faster, and more brilliant in the very near future. The company announced that it has begun mass production on the very first 8-gigabit LPDDR4 Mobile DRAM mobile memory module.

The new chip marks a new benchmark for mobile devices aimed at being the best. In fact, Samsung’s innovation means the best mobile devices likely will have more memory than a lot of laptops and desktop computers.

The new era of 4GB mobile DRAM will have other obvious impacts on the kinds of mobile devices we’re likely to see in the near future.

In a post on Samsung Tomorrow, the company’s official blog, Joo Sun Choi, Executive Vice President of Memory Sales and Marketing at Samsung Electronics, explains:

“By initiating production of the 20nm 8Gb LPDDR4, which is even faster than the DRAM for PCs and servers and consumes much less energy, we are contributing to the timely launch of UHD, large-screen flagship mobile devices. As this major advancement in mobile memory demonstrates, we will continue to closely collaborate with global mobile device manufacturers to optimize DRAM solutions, making them suitable for next-generation mobile OS environments.”

Only the best mobile devices on the market today can offer 3GB DRAM. But with 4GB of mobile DRAM, it looks as if ultra-HD video on mobile devices will be the norm. And this also means larger mobile devices with better quality images.

Samsung says that its new memory innovation enables users to capture ultra-HD video from mobile devices, as well.

In addition to being 50 percent more powerful than the fastest LPDDR3 or DDR3 memory available, the new Samsung chip uses 40 percent less energy too.

And Samsung’s influence will likely be seen in a lot of other companies’ high-end smartphones and tablets released this year, Electronista reports. The company supplies other manufacturers with its memory technology as well.

In another post from the company blog, Samsung’s Memory Sales and Marketing vice president Young-Hyun Jun adds:

“We will continue introducing the most advanced mobile DRAM one step ahead of the rest of the industry so that global OEMs can launch innovative mobile devices with exceptional user convenience in the timeliest manner.”

Samsung will likely unveil the first devices with 4G of mobile DRAM in early 2015.

Image: Samsung

More in: Samsung

[“source-smallbiztrends”]