Facebook Messenger Testing Snapchat-Like Streaks, Gets 4K Resolution Photo Support

Facebook Messenger Testing Snapchat-Like Streaks, Gets 4K Resolution Photo Support

HIGHLIGHTS

  • For streaks, Messenger shows a lightning bolt icon and days counter
  • Streaks provides a glance to ‘fun facts’ about the most active contacts
  • 4K resolution support is rolling out in limited regions

Taking on the competition, Facebook is testing a ‘Streaks’ feature in Messenger that is also used by Snapchat. The Menlo Park, California-headquartered company has also added 4K resolution support to its messaging service to uplift the visual experience. The latter feature is arriving for both Android and iOS platforms.

The first of the two updates to Facebook Messenger is the availability of Snapchat-like streaks feature that has been reported by certain users. The new feature would help Facebook to enhance engagements by letting users have a continuous conversation with their contacts. As spotted by Twitter user Case Sandberg, Facebook Messenger shows a lightning bolt icon next to the name of a person you have messaged for at least two days in a row. A counter is also available alongside the streak icon to reveal for how many days you both have been chatting on Messenger.

In a statement to Mashable, a Facebook spokesperson confirmed the presence of streaks. The spokesperson stated that the feature was in testing to let you “see at a glance fun facts” about the people you have spoken with on Messenger. It also adds that the feature will be visible if the person has been messaged at least “three days in a row”. Although the formal comment does not reveal an expansion of streaks, the feature could arrive on other Facebook-owned properties including Instagram and WhatsApp following its success on Messenger.

In addition to streaks, Facebook Messenger is receiving 4K support take the visual communication to new levels. The new support enables you to send and receive photos in up to 4096×4096 pixels resolution.

facebook 4k resolution support Facebook Messenger 4K  Facebook Messenger  Facebook

Facebook Messenger with 4K support

Despite supporting larger images, Messenger is touted to make it quicker to upload your favourite memories. Of course, you won’t have an as fast experience as the lighter version of Messenger offers on Android devices. But in the latest case, you have the ability to zoom into your memories to see the subjects and objects in detail.

You don’t need to select any specific settings to send 4K photos to your contacts. However, the latest version of the Messenger app is required to enable the new experience. Facebook has started rolling out the 4K resolution in the US, Canada, France, Australia, the UK, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, and South Korea. Other regions will receive the same update in the coming weeks.

As of September, Facebook Messenger has more than 1.3 billion monthly active users worldwide – on par with WhatsApp that reached the same milestone in July. The messaging service also offers a platform to third-party developers to host their apps and games in addition to features like bots, video calling, and peer-to-peer payments.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Google Testing a ‘Panic Button’ on Android to Help Quickly Exit a Malicious App

Google Testing a 'Panic Button' on Android to Help Quickly Exit a Malicious App

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The feature was detected in Android 7.1 Nougat
  • It overrides the back button so that you can exit the malicious app
  • The feature is currently disabled

If there ever was a time for Google to come out with a panic button for Android, then this is it. Coming fresh off the heels of two Android malware-related reports this past week – CopyCat and SpyDealer – it is now being reported that the Internet search giant has secretly added a malware ‘panic button’ feature to Android 7.1 that lets you get out of a malicious app. The feature is not enabled by default, but can be enabled by enterprising users.

We say ‘secretly’ because Google has not revealed anything about this officially, and the feature has actually been discovered by XDA-Developers and Bleeping Computer, who say that the feature guarantees that the user can exit a malicious app and get back to the home screen, if they find themselves a situation where the malware-infested app has disabled the back button.

The panic button feature detects when the back button has been tapped quickly in succession one too many times, and proceeds to override the app to reboot the back action. This will let you get back to the home screen from where you will be able to delete the malicious app. By default, users have to tap the button four times in quick succession, but this number can be changed by the OEM implementing the functionality.

The reason Google has been hush about this is so that hackers don’t find out and figure out a way to go around the fail-safe. But that’s probably not going to last too long. Furthermore, the feature is not enabled as of now, and it’s possible that Google is currently testing it out before it becomes available by default in future versions of the OS.

On Monday, it was reported that an Android malware, named SpyDealer, had the ability to steal a user’s personal data from over 40 popular apps that include Facebook, WhatsApp, Skype, Telegram and more. This comes following another report last week of a CopyCat malware that had reportedly affected over 14 million Android devices last year. These cases have started to paint a pretty gloomy picture about the safety of Android OS, but at least we know now that Google is taking some active anti-malware measure to help out its users.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Twitter Starts Testing View Counts to Surface the Best Videos

twitter video view count story Twitter Video View CountTwitter Starts Testing View Counts to Surface the Best Videos
HIGHLIGHTS
The view count is visible right next to the usual timer on videos
View count could possibly be used to rank content going ahead
Twitter spokesperson has confirmed that test is being conducted
Twitter has reportedly started showing view count on videos for some users as the social network continues to experiment with video related features on its platform. Much like other social media platforms, Twitter has also been trying to figure out video features that are desired by its users so that it can stay relevant.

The view count on videos, which was first spotted by BuzzFeed’s Dorsey Shaw, is now showing up for some people right next to the usual timer, as pointed out in a report by Mashable.

twitter video view count story Twitter Video View Count

Photo Credit: Twitter/@dorseyshaw

“As video consumption continues to increase on Twitter, we are constantly experimenting with ways to provide a rich video experience,” a Twitter spokesperson told Mashable via email. “View counts provide helpful context on the popularity of a video, and we are exploring this feature to help surface the best content,” the spokesperson said.

With this test, it appears like Twitter will soon be ranking content on the basis of their popularity, possibly for its Explore tab, which was added with the aim to make it easier to find interesting content.

The spokesperson has also clarified that within this test the views will be counted as “[Media Rating Council]”. This essentially means that the view will be counted by industry standard of “2 seconds consecutively in view at 50 percent visibility,” Mashable said citing the spokesperson in its report.

It remains to be seen when this new feature will eventually be rolled out to everyone. Twitter recently started looping all videos posted on its website with duration less than 6.5 seconds after the conversion of Vine into a pared-down camera app.

Tags: Twitter Videos, Twitter Video View Count, Twitter, Social, Apps, Social Media Networking Website

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Did In-House Testing Fail to Detect Samsung Note 7 Battery Problems?

Did In-House Battery Testing by Samsung Fail to Detect Note 7 Problems?

Samsung (KRX:005930) tested the batteries for the exploding Galaxy Note 7 in a self-owned lab.

It is the only manufacturer of smartphones allowed to test their phone batteries in-house, according to The Wall Street Journal (WSJ). The rest of phone makers must analyze their phone batteries at one of the 28 labs certified by the Cellular Telephone Industries Association (CTIA), a trade group representing the wireless communication industry.

Phone batteries must go through an experimentation and assessment process in order to comply with standards established by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Samsung officially stopped production of its newest device, the Galaxy Note 7, last week due to reports of the phones exploding, igniting and melting. This came roughly a month after it decided to recall and halt shipments of the product.

Is The Atypical In-House Battery Testing by Samsung to Blame?

The battery is the source of these potentially dangerous malfunctions. A representative for Samsung said that no problems were detected while at the internal testing labs, according to the WSJ.

“We are working with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to investigate the recently reported cases involving the Galaxy Note7,” Samsung said in an official statement last week. “Because consumers’ safety remains our top priority, Samsung will ask all carrier and retail partners globally to stop sales and exchanges of the Galaxy Note 7 while the investigation is taking place.”

But there have been reports of other Samsung products breaking down and becoming harmful.

Marie Terrio’s Samsung S6 Active mobile phone was “crackling and sizzling” in her front left pocket and burned severe gashes into her thigh and shin, according to an exclusive story for The Daily Caller News Foundation (TheDCNF).

Terrio went to the hospital and was treated for second and third degree burns that resulted from the combusting cellular device.

“My leg looked black and the pain was unbelievable,” Terrio told TheDCNF.

A California man is suing Samsung for intense burns allegedly caused by his Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge.

Batteries are the identified cause in the majority of examples of overheating or exploding mobile devices.

Samsung testing its own batteries seems like it could potentially be a conflict of interest, in which a manufacturer may be more likely to green-light a battery for reasons of profit motive.

John Copeland, a former employee of Motorola who now works at a battery test lab in Atlanta, said that cellphone developers would use their own labs because it would help maintain secrecy over the products and the features.

Manufacturers are “very concerned about their proprietary information leaking out,” Copeland told the WSJ.

Copeland believes that the audits were thorough enough to ensure an absence of conflicts of interest.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected]

Image: Samsung

[“source-smallbiztrends”]