Teachers flag concerns over budgets cuts in education

Up in arms: Teachers protest at Jantar Mantar on Monday. Sandeep Saxena   | Photo Credit: Sandeep Saxena

Seek revised pay scales, regularisation of contractual staff

College and university teachers from across the country protested at Jantar Mantar on Monday, raising concerns over low budget allocation in the education sector.

The protest was organised by the All India Federation of University and College Teachers’ Organisations (AIFUCTO). Appealing to the Centre, the body demanded the implementation of the 7th UGC pay revision recommendations after consultation with it and other teachers’ bodies.

It also demanded the regularisation of temporary and contractual teachers, introduction of pay scales and service conditions for part-time and ad hoc teachers, and filling up of vacancies.

‘Scrap API’

Members of the AIFUCTO also demanded scrapping of the Academic Performance Index (API) system, which was introduced by the University Grants Commission to assess teachers before their promotions are granted.

A statement issued by the AIFUCTO read, “All Central government employees, except university and college teachers, are getting their revised pay scales and allowances. Service conditions and terms of career advancement in the teaching profession are becoming stiffer by the day.”

Seeking immediate relief, the statement further read, “The time has come when, as educated minds of the society, we rise up against the autocratic and anti-teachers/anti-education activities of the government.”

The members also protested against the new pension scheme introduced for those appointed after 2004, which does not guarantee any clear amount to them after retirement.

‘Excessive centralisation’

The AIFUCTO also stated that there had been “blatant attempts to throttle the autonomy of higher education through excessive centralisation” under the garb of reforms.

Members of the Haryana Government Teachers’ Association, West Bengal College Teachers’ Association, and Rajasthan University and College Teachers’ Association, among others, participated in the protest.

[“Source-thehindu”]

Corruption in education: Teachers education council asks staff to declare income and assets

National Council for Teacher Education

To curb corruption and bring in greater transparency, the National Council for Teacher Education (NCTE) has asked all its employees to furnish details of their income and assets including property that will be put up on its website.

According to sources, the council has over a period of time received a number of complaints regarding corruption and the move is aimed at checking that.

“All the employees have been asked to provide details of their incomes, vehicles, property and its present market price. Data for three years has been sought from them so that it can be compared with the previous years,” said a senior NCTE official.

The council is responsible for providing recognition to B.Ed colleges and teacher training institutes. There are 11474 such institutes in the country. In the past, NCTE has been accused to processing applications for recognition out of turn. At the same time, a number of inspecting teams had members of questionable credibility and in some cases affiliation was granted even to non-existent colleges.

Once the data of assets is complete it will be put on the NCTE’s website and the figures provided by the employees will also be monitored and compared to their income levels, sources further said.

“Generally too they are supposed to furnish such data but many people don’t do it despite reminders. But this time we have decided to put it on the website so that it is in public view,” added the official.

In case there are cases that look suspicious they will be put on a watch list and will be monitored closely. Employees at all levels including deputy secretary, under secretary, section officers among others have been asked to provide information.

The issue of corruption in NCTE has been raised in the Parliament too, in the past. In 2015, the then HRD minister Smriti Irani had informed the Lok Sabha that after reconstitution of the NCTE in May 2013, a vigilance wing was established in NCTE headed by Chief Vigilance Officer to look after the vigilance cases against the officers/officials of NCTE and in its Regional Offices.

“The Vigilance branch takes necessary measures in the cases of irregularities that come to their notice. In order to ensure transparency in the functioning of the NCTE, several steps have been initiated such as the online submission of applications for grant of recognition, on-line payment of fees and processing of applications in chronological order, etc”.

 

 

[“source-hindustantimes”]

One Part Educator, One Part Techie: Why Today’s Teachers Have to Be Both

teachers and educational technology

The last two decades have seen the education sector move at lightning speed especially in the area of educational technology.

Fifteen to twenty years ago, technology in education was a debatable subject. Everyone had his or her own views about the impact technology would have on the way we learn. There were, of course, both positives and negatives associated with use of technology in education. But gradually, as technology became embraced by educational institutions, those who resisted its application started to appreciate it.

These days, teachers and educational technology are intertwined. New technology hits the market every day, completely revolutionizing the way teaching is approached in schools. Today, there are hundreds of tools that teachers can use to connect with students, communicate with parents, colleagues and administrators. As a teacher, being technologically savvy is no longer an option. Education is advancing with technology and as the younger generation adapts, so must educators and parents in order to maintain a strong, relevant connection.

Below are some of the reasons why a technologically savvy teacher is a must today.

Improved Efficiency and Effectiveness for Students

Data usage by teachers in education is growing. For instance, streaming video and multimedia are increasingly used by teachers in their curriculum. Teachers are called upon to understand how their usage video and multimedia affects networks and how to communicate those needs to IT staff.

To meet these needs, bandwidth may need to be increased and virtual local area networks (VLANs) need to be set up quickly. And IT staff need to be able to monitor performance and manage service levels for teachers and students.

Likewise, as needs grow, the costs of delivering IT can grow. School districts and educational institutions are moving to cloud-based environments. These enable scalable networks. And the cloud opens up and broadens teaching capabilities for teachers and learning capacities for students, such as with opening up more distance learning. Through the cloud, teachers can pool work and resources. By spending less time, money and effort on IT, and by leveraging cloud resources, educational institutions and teachers can focus more on students and creating a better learning environment.

Improved Learning and Teacher to Student Connection

Many young people construct a social identity on the Internet. To better understand their way of thinking as a teacher, you need to be on their home turf, using the same technology they use, accessing social media, listening to their music — understanding how they live by experiencing it. You need to identify where they’re spending their time (favorite social networks Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and YouTube come to mind), and use their functionality as a way to inspire teaching methods. This way, you’ll have an edgier appeal to technology-oriented students.

For instance, many teachers are using a flipped classroom – a practice in which students watch lecture videos as homework, and the discussion is carried out the following day during class with the teacher’s guidance. This approach has consequently resulted in better student performance. Students have the opportunity to learn at their own pace, and use class time for clarification and interaction.

Online cloud collaboration tools, such Google Drive, Dropbox and more, allow students and teachers to share notes and assignments online, edit them in real time, and project them on a screen. These tools eliminate the need for some students to go to a classroom as everything is done online from class discussions, to submitting assignments and grading.

Improved Teacher-Parent Communication

The way in which teachers communicate with parents has also changed dramatically over the last decade. Long gone are the days of telephone calls and voice messages. The fastest way to reach an educator is via email. The importance of report cards has even given way to technology, as grades are now entered online by teachers and can be accessed by parents in real-time, 24/7.

Parents and students now also have access via the Internet or even apps in some cases to every single grade, tardiness, absence, and more. Apps like Edmodo allow parents to log in and see what’s going on.

Enhanced Teacher to Teacher Collaboration

The way teachers communicate with each other to share ideas and offer support has also evolved with technology. They can now share videos, lesson plans, and images instantly, as well as discuss their ideas online as they go.

Teachers can also instantly communicate and connect with their colleagues across the world, refine their lesson plans and find the latest new information on a particular subject to provide their students with the best education possible. There are even tools such as Teachers Pay Teachers which permits teachers to sell their own classroom materials and buy high-quality materials from other teachers.

Educators are now required to do an online portfolio for their practicum, among other online activities, to obtain their education degrees. Some teachers even go back to school or take supplemental courses to keep up with the ever-changing “industry standard” for the modern-day classroom and its technologically demanding student.

It is important for teachers to be open to new ways of doing things. On an almost a weekly basis, new technologies become available that can completely transform the way teachers work and teach.

A good teacher is one that maintains an avid interest in new technologies, with the aim of improving the effectiveness of their teaching methods to better reach their students.

Teacher Image via Shutterstock

More in: Sponsored

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

One Part Educator, One Part Techie: Why Today’s Teachers Have to Be Both

teachers and educational technology

The last two decades have seen the education sector move at lightning speed especially in the area of educational technology.

Fifteen to twenty years ago, technology in education was a debatable subject. Everyone had his or her own views about the impact technology would have on the way we learn. There were, of course, both positives and negatives associated with use of technology in education. But gradually, as technology became embraced by educational institutions, those who resisted its application started to appreciate it.

These days, teachers and educational technology are intertwined. New technology hits the market every day, completely revolutionizing the way teaching is approached in schools. Today, there are hundreds of tools that teachers can use to connect with students, communicate with parents, colleagues and administrators. As a teacher, being technologically savvy is no longer an option. Education is advancing with technology and as the younger generation adapts, so must educators and parents in order to maintain a strong, relevant connection.

Below are some of the reasons why a technologically savvy teacher is a must today.

Improved Efficiency and Effectiveness for Students

Data usage by teachers in education is growing. For instance, streaming video and multimedia are increasingly used by teachers in their curriculum. Teachers are called upon to understand how their usage video and multimedia affects networks and how to communicate those needs to IT staff.

To meet these needs, bandwidth may need to be increased and virtual local area networks (VLANs) need to be set up quickly. And IT staff need to be able to monitor performance and manage service levels for teachers and students.

Likewise, as needs grow, the costs of delivering IT can grow. School districts and educational institutions are moving to cloud-based environments. These enable scalable networks. And the cloud opens up and broadens teaching capabilities for teachers and learning capacities for students, such as with opening up more distance learning. Through the cloud, teachers can pool work and resources. By spending less time, money and effort on IT, and by leveraging cloud resources, educational institutions and teachers can focus more on students and creating a better learning environment.

Improved Learning and Teacher to Student Connection

Many young people construct a social identity on the Internet. To better understand their way of thinking as a teacher, you need to be on their home turf, using the same technology they use, accessing social media, listening to their music — understanding how they live by experiencing it. You need to identify where they’re spending their time (favorite social networks Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and YouTube come to mind), and use their functionality as a way to inspire teaching methods. This way, you’ll have an edgier appeal to technology-oriented students.

For instance, many teachers are using a flipped classroom – a practice in which students watch lecture videos as homework, and the discussion is carried out the following day during class with the teacher’s guidance. This approach has consequently resulted in better student performance. Students have the opportunity to learn at their own pace, and use class time for clarification and interaction.

Online cloud collaboration tools, such Google Drive, Dropbox and more, allow students and teachers to share notes and assignments online, edit them in real time, and project them on a screen. These tools eliminate the need for some students to go to a classroom as everything is done online from class discussions, to submitting assignments and grading.

Improved Teacher-Parent Communication

The way in which teachers communicate with parents has also changed dramatically over the last decade. Long gone are the days of telephone calls and voice messages. The fastest way to reach an educator is via email. The importance of report cards has even given way to technology, as grades are now entered online by teachers and can be accessed by parents in real-time, 24/7.

Parents and students now also have access via the Internet or even apps in some cases to every single grade, tardiness, absence, and more. Apps like Edmodo allow parents to log in and see what’s going on.

Enhanced Teacher to Teacher Collaboration

The way teachers communicate with each other to share ideas and offer support has also evolved with technology. They can now share videos, lesson plans, and images instantly, as well as discuss their ideas online as they go.

Teachers can also instantly communicate and connect with their colleagues across the world, refine their lesson plans and find the latest new information on a particular subject to provide their students with the best education possible. There are even tools such as Teachers Pay Teachers which permits teachers to sell their own classroom materials and buy high-quality materials from other teachers.

Educators are now required to do an online portfolio for their practicum, among other online activities, to obtain their education degrees. Some teachers even go back to school or take supplemental courses to keep up with the ever-changing “industry standard” for the modern-day classroom and its technologically demanding student.

It is important for teachers to be open to new ways of doing things. On an almost a weekly basis, new technologies become available that can completely transform the way teachers work and teach.

A good teacher is one that maintains an avid interest in new technologies, with the aim of improving the effectiveness of their teaching methods to better reach their students.

Teacher Image via Shutterstock

More in: Sponsored

[“source-smallbiztrends”]