‘Start-up dads’ at Mumbai tech major get 3-month paternity leave

Image result for 'Start-up dads' at Mumbai tech major get 3-month paternity leaveA strong paternity policy helps in addressing work-life conflicts which are a reality for both men and women after the birth of a baby .
MUMBAI: The war for talent is playing out in a big way as companies outplay each other on employee benefits. Of these, paternity or childcare leave to the secondary caregiver parent has emerged as one of the key attractions.Salesforce, the Bay Area tech giant, is the latest to set a new benchmark on paternity leave and emerge as a company that offers the largest quantum so far -three months -of secondary caregiver leave. Recently , Microsoft increased its paternity leave to six weeks. Early this year, Cummins India had set a new benchmark among manufacturing firms by raising its paternity leave to one month.This comes when most other companies offer 10 days to two weeks as paternity leave.

For firms like Salesforce, an attractive paternity leave of 12 weeks is expected to assist in talent acquisition, especially since the firm is on the lookout for skilled people.

Jnanesh Kumar, director, Employee Success (India), Salesforce, said, “We believe offering paid paternity leave is the right thing to do, the right way to treat our employees. Becoming a new parent is a huge undertaking.For parents who are forced to take unpaid family leave, the situation becomes infinitely more challenging. A strong paternity policy helps in addressing work-life conflicts which are a reality for both men and women after the birth of a baby . More importantly , we want to encourage people in India to talk about paternity leave and remove the stigma from women.“

Globally , Salesforce has over 25,000 employees. In India, the company has offices in Delhi, Mumbai, Hyderabad and Bengaluru. It’s been a year since it launched its centre of excellence in Hyderabad, which is one of its largest engineering and customer success hubs globally .

The government recently mandated a six-month maternity leave. Some companies have de-linked parental leave from gender by the usage of terms like primary caregiver and secondary caregiver. Most progressive companies extend their parental policies to adoption and surrogacy as well.

[“Source-economictimes”]

Start-up Failure Rates Vary — Choosing the Right Industry Matters

I’m following up my posting of a few weeks ago on new business failure rates where I said that there are considerable differences across industry sectors in business failure rates.

Below is Figure 7.1 (p.113) from my book Illusions of Entrepreneurship: The Costly Myths that Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Policy Makers Live By. The data come from an article by Amy Knaup in Monthly Labor Review and look at the 1998 cohort of new businesses.

Business failure rates by industry

(Click for larger image)

Source: Adapted from Knaup, A. 2005. Survival and longevity in business employment dynamics data. Monthly Labor Review, May: 50-56.

The data show that the four-year survival rate in the information sector is only 38 percent, but is 55 percent in the education and health services sector. That is, the average start-up in education and health sector is 50 percent more likely than the average start-up in the information sector to live four years. That’s a huge difference.

Moreover, most of the sector trajectories don’t cross; the sectors that have lower initial survival rates generally tend to continue with these lower survival rates every year.

In short, the sector of the economy in which you start your business has a huge effect on the odds that your company will still be around several years in the future.

* * * * *

About the Author: Scott Shane is A. Malachi Mixon III, Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies at Case Western Reserve University. He is the author of eight books, including Illusions of Entrepreneurship: The Costly Myths that Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Policy Makers Live By; Finding Fertile Ground: Identifying Extraordinary Opportunities for New Ventures; Technology Strategy for Managers and Entrepreneurs; and From Ice Cream to the Internet: Using Franchising to Drive the Growth and Profits of Your Company.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Start-up Failure Rates Vary — Choosing the Right Industry Matters


I’m following up my posting of a few weeks ago on new business failure rateswhere I said that there are considerable differences across industry sectors in business failure rates.

Below is Figure 7.1 (p.113) from my book Illusions of Entrepreneurship: The Costly Myths that Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Policy Makers Live By. The data come from an article by Amy Knaup in Monthly Labor Review and look at the 1998 cohort of new businesses.

Business failure rates by industry

(Click for larger image)

Source: Adapted from Knaup, A. 2005. Survival and longevity in business employment dynamics data. Monthly Labor Review, May: 50-56.

The data show that the four-year survival rate in the information sector is only 38 percent, but is 55 percent in the education and health services sector. That is, the average start-up in education and health sector is 50 percent more likely than the average start-up in the information sector to live four years. That’s a huge difference.

Moreover, most of the sector trajectories don’t cross; the sectors that have lower initial survival rates generally tend to continue with these lower survival rates every year.

In short, the sector of the economy in which you start your business has a huge effect on the odds that your company will still be around several years in the future.

* * * * *

About the Author: Scott Shane is A. Malachi Mixon III, Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies at Case Western Reserve University. He is the author of eight books, including Illusions of Entrepreneurship: The Costly Myths that Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Policy Makers Live By; Finding Fertile Ground: Identifying Extraordinary Opportunities for New Ventures; Technology Strategy for Managers and Entrepreneurs; and From Ice Cream to the Internet: Using Franchising to Drive the Growth and Profits of Your Company.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Cork-based start-up Zeto secures investment of €1.7m

Zeto software has been deployed across Lidl’s 182 Irish stores.Zeto software has been deployed across Lidl’s 182 Irish stores.

Cork-based technology start-up Zeto has secured an investment of €1.7 million, in a funding round led by Kernel Capital.

The investment was made through the Bank of Ireland Kernel Capital venture fund, with commitments from Business Venture Partners (BVP) andEnterprise Ireland.

The company has also landed a major commercial contract with Lidl Ireland. Established by father and son Michael and Stephen Slattery, Zeto develops and sells cloud-based software for the management of commercial refrigeration systems.

Zeto’s software has been deployed across Lidl’s 182 Irish stores, where it monitors 8,000 pieces of equipment and provides 2.25 million real time data points for the retailer each day.

Aoife Clarke of Lidl Ireland said the platform provides the most up to date technology to monitor temperatures and guarantee quality in the supply chain.

“It will enable us to safeguard stock in the event of issues with the refrigeration equipment and highlights inefficiencies that may become problematic in the future.”

Zeto chief executive Stephen Slattery said Lidl now have of the most comprehensive refrigeration management systems to be found in any supermarket chain globally.

“We remain on track to create in the region of 35 high value job in Cork over the next three years,” he added.

Founded in 2012, Zeto uses wireless sensor networks and cloud technologies to ensure refrigeration equipment is operating and maintained to the highest of standards.

[“source-Irishtimes”]