Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro Review

Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro works with both Android and iOS
  • It features waterproofing, in addition to GPS and Super AMOLED display
  • It is currently priced at Rs. 13,590

Upon reviewing the Gear Fit 2 at the beginning of 2017, we said it redefined what buyers should expect at its price point (then less than Rs. 12,000). It handily beat every Fitbit offering, and was especially suited to those with Samsung phones. We did have a few complaints, and in the months since then, Samsung has fixed one big one.

The new Gear Fit 2 Pro is similar to its direct predecessor in most ways. The addition of the ‘Pro’ suffix is because of its more fitness-focused features, including waterproofing – you can easily take this new wearable into the shower, pool, or ocean (up to 50m deep) without worry. There’s also continuous heart rate tracking now, so the device will always keep an eye on how you’re doing.

This is Samsung’s third take on a complete fitness wearable, and it shows in its construction quality, ease of use, and feature list. Now that the Gear Fit 2 has been discontinued, this is the one to consider.

Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro look, feel, and navigation

Samsung has opted for a traditional railroad strap with the Gear Fit 2 Pro, which will be familiar to most people. Inserting the strap’s tooth into the last hole isn’t as easy it was on the Gear Fit 2, but the quality of material used here is definitely better. The Gear Fit 2’s rubber strap left rashes on our arm on days with a lot heavy walking, but that hasn’t been the case with this new model.

The display on the Gear Fit 2 Pro is the same as before; a 1.5-inch Super AMOLED curved screen that can show all colours, and works with the slightest of touches. In contrast, those on Fitbit devices usually require harder presses. The two buttons – Back, and Home – are still on the right side of the wearable. You can wake up the Gear Fit Pro with a press of either button, or just tilt your wrist so that the display faces you.

samung gear fit 2 pro 02 Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro

 

Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro software

Samsung has improved the customisation options for watch faces on the Gear Fit 2 Pro. You can tweak not only what statistics you want displayed on the home screen, but also the colour and font. That helps personalise the device, and there are also hundreds more watch faces available via the Gear Store.

Speaking of the Gear Store, Samsung has (thankfully) gotten rid of the strange forced localisation that we were treated to when we reviewed the Gear Fit 2, so you won’t have to deal with a Hindi interface just because you’re browsing from India. We still couldn’t find a way to change it, but defaulting to English is a better choice in our opinion.

The store is still region locked though, which means the likes of Spotify and UA Record aren’t available without the help of a VPN, removing the SIM card, and all that jazz. Still, there are many more useful apps now, with the focus clearly on exercising: Under Armour Record, MapMyRun, MyFitnessPal, and Endomondo are the highlights of the lot.

The biggest annoyance with the iOS app is that it takes forever to connect to the Gear Fit 2 Pro. For what it’s worth, you don’t need to use the app much unless you regularly wish to install and test new apps, but it can be frustrating when you need to tweak something on the go. Even when it does connect, it can end up randomly disconnecting if you move your hand even slightly.

Installing apps is cumbersome for no reason at all. The Gear Fit app throws up multiple dialog boxes before every download, asking whether you want to download directly to the device (the Gear Fit 2 Pro has Wi-Fi as before), informing you that downloads over 1MB can result in high mobile data charges (even if your phone is connected to Wi-Fi), and then a permissions screen. On top of all that, installation takes too long, and apps in the queue don’t download if the phone’s screen goes off.

samung gear fit 2 pro app Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro

 

Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro activity monitoring, GPS, music, and notifications

Like its predecessor, the Gear Fit 2 Pro is capable of tracking a wide variety of activities. That includes walking, cycling, squats, and yoga, as well as using exercise bikes and rowing machines. The one big addition this time is swimming. That’s made possible thanks to full waterproofing on Samsung’s new wearable, as opposed to just splash-proofing on the older Gear Fit 2. The device can track these activities automatically, but you won’t get a GPS route of your exercise unless you trigger it manually.

Getting a GPS lock takes a long time on the Gear Fit 2 Pro with an iPhone, more so if there are a lot of trees or skyscrapers on the route you normally use. It can mean losing the first one to two minutes of your activity, and in some cases, the device might even give up and ask you to move into an open space to try again. With Android, it’s a lot better as Samsung can pull A-GPS data from your paired phone.

But hey, the fact that built-in GPS is an option means that you can leave behind your bulky phone, and not have to deal with arm straps during workouts. The Bluetooth functionality and 4GB of onboard storage let you carry music with you and use wireless headphones. There’s a caveat to that storage figure though – of the 4GB, 1.9GB is already occupied by the system itself, so you start off with 2.1GB. Still, that’s enough space for nearly 300 songs encoded at 320kbps, with an average length of 3 minutes.

You can use Wi-Fi to transfer music via the Gear Music Manager app, and you can even use it to maintain a remote connection with your phone beyond the capability of Bluetooth. That way, you’ll know when you’re getting a call (and other notifications) even if your phone is silent and in some corner of the house, as long as you’re wearing the Gear Fit 2 Pro of course.

Notifications support is wider than with most Fitbits, and alerts from every app – on both Android and iOS – will show up on the wearable. On Android, you can turn off what notifications you want from the app, but with iOS, all notifications are on by default and can be blocked the first time they pop up. With Samsung’s own phones, you can send canned replies too.

samung gear fit 2 pro s health Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro

 

Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro performance

We tested the Gear Fit 2 Pro against mile markers on a running track, and with the built-in GPS on, the Gear Fit 2 Pro was well on point during activity tracking, with a 3 percent average error rate in distance measured. Turn the GPS off, and the Samsung wearable became a lot worse, arriving at an 11 percent average error rate. (Runkeeper, using an iPhone’s built-in GPS, showed an average error rate of less than 3 percent.)

When cycling, the Gear Fit 2 Pro’s GPS problem is more pronounced, since bikes are naturally faster than running. We found that we lost records of the first 40-60 seconds of our exercise routines, unless we were okay waiting for the device to get a lock before starting off. Even worse, doing so affected all our stats, as Samsung considers that time as part of the activity.

Samsung’s S Health app hasn’t gotten the facelift it needs, but the amount of data it gives you for your exercises is great. It’s deeper than what the likes of Fitbit and Runkeeper provide, owing to how both those apps generate revenue for their makers. The behemoth that is Samsung has no need to lock your data behind a paywall. Samsung is also trying to keep up with Fitbit’s innovations in the sleep department, giving you a look at light and deep sleep, and how much rest you actually got.

In terms of battery life, the Gear Fit 2 Pro lasts two to three days with moderate usage. That’s if you keep Wi-Fi and GPS off through the day, and only rely on Bluetooth to maintain a connection to your phone. For those used to the five days that most Fitbit devices can manage, this means more frequent charges. It only takes a little over an hour to get it from single digits to a full charge, given the 200mAh battery.

samung gear fit 2 pro fitbit charge 2 Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro Fitbit Charge 2

 

Verdict
The Samsung Gear Fit 2 Pro isn’t a game-changer compared to its predecessor, but waterproofing and continuous heart tracking are welcome additions, especially since they come without a price bump. The Pro model has been launched at the same Rs. 13,990 price as Gear Fit 2, and is already down to Rs. 13,590 in retail. Samsung was quite aggressive with the pricing of the original, bringing it down to Rs. 11,990 in a few months, and it eventually hit Rs. 8,990, and we could see the same pattern this time around.

Even if that doesn’t happen, Samsung’s latest is already more affordable than the Fitbit Charge 2 (Rs. 14,990, but often discounted). Moreover, the Gear Fit 2 Pro has more features and capabilities than the Charge 2 – built-in GPS, a Super AMOLED display, full notifications support, and now waterproofing – that Samsung would be our first choice even if it winds up costing a little more.

Pros:

  • Built-in GPS
  • Super AMOLED screen is still great
  • Waterproofing, can track swims
  • Full notifications support

Cons:

  • Region-locked store is frustrating
  • Display is weak outdoors
  • Inaccurate without GPS

Ratings (out of 5)

  • Design: 4
  • Tracking: 4
  • Other features: 5
  • Value for money: 3.5
  • Overall: 4

[“Source-ndtv”]

Honda Grazia Vs Suzuki Access 125: Comparison Review

simplezoom-img

Highlights

  • The Honda Grazia has more youthful design
  • The Suzuki Access has better top-end performance
  • The Honda Grazia is slightly more expensive than the Suzuki Access

There’s something about scooters, they are everywhere, and scooters have become the favourite mode of commute for a lot of people these days. The Honda Activa is perhaps the most well-known name in the world of scooters, easily surpassing all other brands in terms of sales volumes. Most of these are the bread and butter 110 cc scooters, but things are changing quickly as more and more consumers are warming up towards scooters with slightly more power and better dynamics. And there’s now renewed interest in the 125 cc scooter space with the Suzuki Access leading the pack.

Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India (HMSI) already has a very capable 125 cc scooter in the Honda Activa 125, but there’s been an equally capable, and one of the largest selling 125 cc scooters to contend with – the Suzuki Access. So, enter the new 125 cc scooter from HMSI – the Honda Grazia! It shares the same engine and cycle parts with the Honda Activa 125, but it gets a complete revamp in styling and features. And it’s now the Honda Grazia which will try to repeat the success of its smaller sibling, in the 125 cc scooter segment. So, a comparison with the Suzuki Access is inevitable.

Also Read: Honda Grazia First Ride Review

honda grazia vs suzuki access comparison review

The Honda Grazia has a more youthful and trendy design than the Suzuki Access

A matter of style

Without doubt, the new Honda Grazia is one of the most striking looking scooters in the market right now. That’s not to say that the Suzuki Access lacks in the looks department in any way. But both scooters follow completely different design philosophies and look entirely different from each other. The Honda Grazia offers a trendy, youthful design, which will certainly appeal to young riders looking for a sharp, new-age, and contemporary scooter. It’s got an attractive front apron, with full-LED headlights, with sharp creases on the body and a sleek rear end with a split grab rail and smart taillight unit.

honda grazia vs suzuki access comparison review

The Suzuki Access has understated looks, but has the universally acceptable design

The new Suzuki Access has been around for a couple of years now, and its design is more conventional, a little understated even, but it’s a handsome scooter nevertheless. The chromed headlight, round rear view mirrors and simple design of the Access gives it a retro touch, but build quality, fit and finish is definitely good. The rear end of the Access is also not much to talk about, it’s not bad looking in any way, but the Access has a more sober, understated look overall. In a way it’s the more universally acceptable design, and will cater to a diverse range of customers with different aesthetic sensibilities. The Grazia on the other hand, is the flashier, trendier and more stylish of the two scooters.

honda grazia vs suzuki access comparison review

The Honda Grazia is loaded with features and makes the Access look retro

Features and more

The Honda Grazia gets an all-digital instrument panel which definitely adds to the premium-ness of the scooter and suitably complements its somewhat avant-garde design. It offers a lot more information, including a tachometer, speedometer, fuel gauge and even a clock. The Access on the other hand, has a somewhat plain-Jane clock, with a retro-looking analog speedometer and just a small digital screen below with the odometer and fuel gauge.

The Grazia also offers a nice ‘flip-open’ cubbyhole at the front to carry a mobile phone or other knick knacks, but the Access offers an open storage space. Both scooters have remote switches to flip up the seat. The Grazia has a switch-activated rear hatch opener, while the Access has a handier switch integrated into the ignition. Both scooters have generous underseat storage, the Grazia offers 18 litres of underseat storage, while the Access gets some more room with 21 litres. But both don’t offer enough storage for a full-sized helmet under the seat.

honda grazia vs suzuki access comparison review

The Honda Grazia has a smooth and refined 125 cc engine

Engines and Performance

Both scooters have similarly-specced engines, offering near comparable power and torque figures, at least on paper. The Honda Grazia’s single-cylinder, air-cooled, 124.9 cc engine makes 8.52 bhp at 6,500 rpm and maximum torque of 10.54 Nm at 5,000 rpm. The Suzuki Access is powered by a 124 cc single-cylinder, air-cooled engine which makes marginally more power – 8.58 bhp at 7,000 rpm, but slightly less peak torque of 10.2 Nm at 5,000 rpm. On paper, both scooters are evenly matched, and on the road too, there’s not much of a difference in the way they perform.

simplezoom-img

The Suzuki Access is 5 kg lighter than the Honda Grazia

But the Honda Grazia at 107 kg kerb weight, weighs a full 5 kg more than the Suzuki Access, which weighs 102 kg. The engines of both scooters are refined and offer smooth acceleration, but it’s the Access which feels more eager to move, and feels peppier from the get-go. It’s quicker than the Grazia and also feels more eager to move at higher speeds. That’s not to say that the Grazia’s performance is lacking in any way; it’s got a refined engine too, and has a strong mid-range, but if it’s high speed cruising you’re looking at, and overall acceleration, it’s the Suzuki Access which comes out tops.

Also Read: 2016 Suzuki Access 125 Review

honda grazia vs suzuki access comparison review

The Suzuki Access feels more spirited and has better top end performance

Ride and Handling

Both scooters offer decent ride quality and are almost evenly matched in terms of handling. Both the Grazia and the Access have telescopic front suspension, and ride on 12-inch front wheels and 10-inch rear wheels. But the ride quality is ever so different. The Grazia feels slightly stiff compared to the Access, and it’s the Access which cushions bad roads better than the Grazia. The Access also has a slightly broader and longer seat and that makes it feel slightly plusher and more comfortable than the Grazia. In terms of riding position too, it’s the Access which offers an easier riding position than the Grazia, especially when negotiating a curve or flicking the scooter around a corner.

honda grazia vs suzuki access comparison review

The Honda Grazia gets combined braking system (CBS) which the Suzuki Access does not have

That said, both scooters offer near similar handling, but again, it’s the Access which offers more confidence to flick it around a corner or two. Both scooters offer optional front disc brakes, and the Grazia offers the combined-braking system, which essentially activates both brakes simultaneously with just one brake lever, so that really helps in emergency braking manoeuvres. But the Access offers slightly better bite and progression on the lever, and as long as you’re pulling both levers together, the Access offers sure-shot braking power as well.

The last word

The Honda Grazia certainly ups the ante in the 125 cc scooter segment with its flashy design, and features like the all-digital speedometer and LED headlights. It looks youthful, upmarket, and will certainly appeal to someone looking for a trendy and features-loaded scooter with a smooth and refined engine. The Suzuki Access is more the understated gent, but in terms of pure performance and ride quality, we can’t really ignore the qualities it possesses. From a purely enthusiast point of view too, it’s the Suzuki Access, which offer more smiles every time you wring open the throttle and negotiate the urban jungle. Besides, with its understated, yet handsome looks, the Access is more universally acceptable to a wide range of riders, ranging from lady riders to the young executive and even slightly more mature riders. At ₹ 57,744 (ex-showroom) for the disc-brake variant, it’s the Suzuki Access which offers the better value for money option. And even the Access 125 Special Edition, the one we are testing in this comparison, costs less than ₹ 60,000, at ₹ 59,319 (ex-showroom Delhi).

honda grazia vs suzuki access comparison review

The Honda Grazia is more expensive than the Suzuki Access

At ₹ 62,505 (ex-showroom Delhi) for the disc brake variant, the Honda Grazia is the more expensive scooter, but it offers a whole lot more in terms of the overall package. And to top it off, Honda also offers a far superior sales and service network than Suzuki, and that makes the Grazia inch ahead of the Access in the eventual comparison. But if you’re in the market for a 125 cc scooter, do take a very close look and a test ride of both these scooters, back to back. Each of these two scooters has their own strengths, and eventually it will really come down to personal choice, and a real close calculation of what “value for money” means, to choose one over the other.

[“Source-ndtv”]

Mukkabaaz Movie Review: Vineet Kumar Singh Shines In Anurag Kashyap’s Greatest Film

Image result for Mukkabaaz Movie Review: Vineet Kumar Singh Shines In Anurag Kashyap's Greatest Film

Mukkabaaz review: Vineet Kumar Singh in a still (Image courtesy: AnuragK2.0)

Cast: Vineet Kumar Singh, Rajesh Tailang, Jimmy Shergill, Shreedhar Dubey, Zoya Hussain

Director: Anurag Kashyap

Rating: Five stars

There is nothing I love more in boxing than the feint. The act of throwing half a punch – the very beginning of the blow, to be precise – in order to bluff and misdirect your opponent, making them bob the wrong way before you hook them right, is elegantly artful. Mukkabaaz does this devastatingly well. As a viewer, it is enormously thrilling when a film threatens or promises to go in one direction, prepares you for it, and heads surprisingly, joyously in another. This is not the film you might expect.

The film opens with a lynching. Worse, it opens with a lynching that is being recorded on a cameraphone, as Muslim cow-traders are beaten and exhorted to say ‘Jai Shri Ram.’ This is horrific, but the two boxers watching the clip later are merely bemused. They identify the goons as fellow fighters, and, walking past one of them, tease him as he cursorily denies the accusations. Their tone is not of admonition and accusation but of jovial jeering, as if a rascal was caught doing something playful. This is what it means to them. These are the boxers of Bareilly, and our hero Shravan Kumar is the best of the lot.

Thus does director Anurag Kashyap double-load the film right from the start, giving us a hero to love – soft-eyed and sincere and spry – while making him worship a rapist like Mike Tyson. Kashyap is at his absolute best in Mukkabaaz, all heart and heartland, a movie made with a vintage filmi sensibility but highly modern skills. And a story that bleeds. The love is pulpy and the revenge served up with masala, and that treatment takes this vital narrative farther.

Our boxer rebels, you see. One sunny day he steps up against his dictatorial boxing overlord, a coach who makes his students carry grain and clean mutton, and socks him in the face. This is not because of righteous indignation – though he claims it is – but because a girl in the coach’s house has arrested his attention and he wants, desperately, to make an impression. He is thrashed, soundly, by several, but he has played his card. He wants nothing more than to be her hero.

She, too, wants a hero. Appropriately named Sunaina – the one with lovely eyes – she is a mute girl who speaks volumes with her giant, limpid eyes, and they gleam as she tries to convince her mother that this boxer is a good idea. The mother has several objections, but she brushes them aside as she imitates Ranveer Singh’s dandruffy Tattar-Tattar dance step to say that Shravan looks at her the way Singh looks at… Looks at who, her mother asks? Sign language is forsaken now as she moves her mouth enthusiastically, with an Indian heroine needing no more than a couple of syllables for complete recognition: Dee-pi-ka.

These lovers are, naturally, star-crossed. He is a boxer with little hope of a fighting future especially after his impulsively-conceived act of defiance, and Sunaina is not just a Brahmin but the niece to the man Shravan punched. There are massive complications, but Kashyap tackles them with a superbly light touch, throwing in crowdpleasing lines and lyrics as well as an overall front-bencher approach that genuinely made me whistle. This doesn’t come at the cost of the film’s politics. Pricklier and slyer than the director has been in the past, Mukkabaaz reaches its dark centre with a scene where neighbours come over and offer what they call mutton to a Dalit coach before there is a power outage. The cow-mob erupts all over the boxers who didn’t know better.

The film has four cinematographers – Rajeev Ravi, Shanker Raman, Jay Patel, Jayesh Nair – and I assume a couple of them were responsible exclusively for the in-ring action, which looks fantastically credible as well as mud-coated and earthy. There is a terrific tracking shot in the beginning, which follows Shravan as he enters the feudal coach’s home, and delivers the grain before looking up and the shot breaks only when he looks up to see Sunaina. It’s a fine looking film, bright and vivid yet shadowy when it needs to be, and the music by Nucleya and Rachita Arora gives it vitality, with some lyrics penned by co-screenwriter Vineet Kumar Singh, who also happens to play Shravan.
His is a tremendous performance, not least because of his staggeringly authentic physicality. Singh looks the part, from the way his t-shirt sleeve cuts into his biceps like tightly tied twine to the agility with which he skips in the ring, and his arduous workouts immediately put glossier Hindi film heroes in their place. He makes Shravan real, when he’s throwing punches as well as when he’s vulnerable. Singh has always been impressive, but this is the kind of breakout performance that will make the country take notice. It’s a knockout. This is a long film, and contains interludes that aren’t strictly necessary – like that of a sadistic boss – but Vineet’s compelling performance makes him a character to root for, and even if we are shown the odds too many times, his triumphs feel earned, they feel good. They feel like our triumphs.

He is also a thickheaded hero, one who beats people up and apologises to them, repeatedly, and the way he looks at his heroine is with reined-in desire, expressing his interest with apologetic eyes, as if he doesn’t dare expect reciprocation.

It isn’t hard to see why he would be smitten. The girl’s hands move faster than his own, while furiously expressing herself via sign-language, sure, but also when she slaps him, which she does hard and with impunity, whenever she needs to make a point. Zoya Hussain is great in an excessively demanding part, mute but loud as can be, the feistiest heroine we’ve had in a while.

Ravi Kishan blew me away with his role as a sincere Dalit coach, one who grew up idolising Pele, wasn’t allowed to box, but is an athlete and sits bolt upright, even when being insulted.

[“Source-ndtv”]

Creative Muvo 2c Review

Creative Muvo 2c Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Muvo 2c can be used as a standalone MP3 player
  • It performs well with vocals and can get really loud
  • The Creative Muvo 2c is priced at Rs. 4,999

Creative is a familiar name when it comes to speakers and headphones. In its early days, it was the go-to brand for PC audio components, and today it sells a diverse range of consumer audio peripherals. Its Muvo series of portable Bluetooth speakers has generally been targeted at young people and those with active lifestyles, which is reflected in the products’ bright colours and snazzy designs.

We’ve reviewed a few of them in the past, including the Muvo 10, Muvo 20, and Muvo Mini. Today, we’ll be testing one of the company’s recent launches in India, the Muvo 2c. This pocket-sized speaker boasts of a water-resistant body and some interesting usage modes. With a sticker price of Rs 4,999, let’s see if it’s worth recommending.

Creative Muvo 2c design and features

The Muvo 2c ships in a clear acrylic box so you can see it from all sides. Inside, you get the speaker itself, a Micro-USB cable for charging and PC connectivity, a quick start guide, and warranty leaflets. The speaker is available in a range of bright colours internationally, but only the red, blue and black options are being sold in India. It easily fits in the palm of your hand so carrying it around isn’t a problem, and it’s fairly light at just 159g. The speaker has a plastic body with a rubberised coating, which gives it some grip. There’s a metal mesh covering the speaker in the front but no protection for the passive radiator at the back. This could be prone to damage if you’re not careful when transporting the speaker around.

The two rubber strips on the bottom offer good stabilisation, as even with bass-heavy tracks at full volume, the speaker doesn’t move about. There’s a rubber flap on the side which protects the 3.5mm aux input, microSD card slot, and Micro-USB port. However, the rubber flap is a bit to soft so re-sealing it takes a bit of effort.

Creative Muvo 2c buttons ndtv Creative Muvo 2c

 

The Muvo 2c has a series of five hexagonal buttons on the top, along with a microphone and two LED indicators. The first button powers the speaker on or off, and the Bluetooth button is used for pairing and Play/ Pause functions. The third button, labeled M for mode, lets you switch sources between Bluetooth, aux in, microSD, and USB. The colour of the right-hand side LED light tells you which mode you’re in. You get a voice prompt only when you are ready to pair the speaker with a device but for everything else, you have to know what the colour of the LED means. The first LED on the left lights up red when the device is charging.

The Muvo 2c can handle a bit of dust and light splashes of water thanks to the IP66 certification, but it isn’t designed to be submerged under water. You can connect a second Muvo 2c speaker to it and use them in a stereo configuration. It also doubles up as a standalone MP3 player if you use a microSD card. The speaker supports cards of up to 128GB in capacity, and file formats including FLAC, MP3, WAV, and WMA. You also use the Sound Blaster Connect app for Android and iOS to browse through songs on a microSD card and switch sources remotely.

Creative doesn’t specify the size of the driver or supported frequency range, other than the fact that it’s a single full-range audio driver. It only supports the SBC Bluetooth audio codec but you can also answer calls using the built-in microphone.

Creative Muvo 2c ports Creative Muvo 2c

Creative Muvo 2c performance and battery life

There’s no NFC to aid in the pairing process, but doing it manually is quite painless. You can pair the speaker with multiple devices but you can only actively use one of them at a time. In order to play music from another source, you’ll have to first disconnect the one that’s currently playing.

The Muvo 2c is compatible with Creative’s Sound Blaster Connect app for your smartphone and Sound Blaster Control Panel for Windows and macOS. Sound Blaster Connect is a bit flaky on iOS, and it simply refused to detect the speaker despite our persistent efforts. On Android, the app managed to detect the speaker but kept saying it was ‘disconnected’, despite us being able to play songs, so that wasn’t very useful.

The Sound Blaster Control Panel app works better, and we tried it on a Mac. Here, you can switch between different audio profiles (Music, Movies, and Gaming) and customise each one with an equaliser preset, or adjust audio characteristics like boosting dialogues, etc. The firmware of the Muvo 2c can also be upgraded using this software. However, you don’t need the software to use the speaker with a Mac or PC, as simply plugging it into a USB port does the trick.

creative muvo 2c app ndtv creative mauve 2c

 

We dumped a bunch of audio test files onto a 32GB microSD card and the speaker had no trouble playing them. To skip or go to a previous track, you can use the Mode button along with the volume up or down buttons. The files are played in sequence, even if they are in different folders.

As a speakerphone, the Muvo 2c does an okay job, but it’s not great. We found ourselves having to go really close to the speaker in order for the caller to hear us clearly.

For a single-driver speaker of this size, the Muvo 2c gets really loud. Unfortunately, it feels strained once you push the volume beyond 85 percent. Here, the bass from the passive radiator also begins to diminish and the vocals and highs tend to overpower them. At moderate volumes, the speaker is able to deliver a decently wide soundstage with a fairly open and detailed mid-range. In Hotel California by The Eagles, the subtle thump of the bass drum is audible thanks to the passive radiator, and the cymbals have good separation from the other instruments.

The Muvo 2c struggles a bit with heavy bass tracks such as Starboy by The Weeknd at high volume levels, and isn’t very punchy at lower volumes either. We also noticed an intermittent glitch when using it with iOS devices, where the volume sync between the speaker and the phone would randomly break. This meant that changing the volume level on the phone would have no effect on the speaker’s volume. The only way to fix this would be to turn Bluetooth off and then on again on our iPhone.

Creative promises up to six hours of life with the built-in 650mAh battery, but we got much less than that when we tested the Muvo 2c. With the volume set to about 70 percent, we managed get only 3 hours and 32 minutes of continuous music playback, which isn’t great. With such a low battery capacity, there’s only so much you can hope for. You don’t get any audio cues about the battery level either, just a blinking red LED. You can check the battery level by double-pressing the Mode button, which makes the right LED change from green to yellow, purple or red, depending on the level.

Verdict
The Creative Muvo 2c is nice-looking little Bluetooth speaker which packs in quite a bit of functionality for its size. We love its design (although some protection for the radiator would have been preferred), and the fact that it can be used as a compact standalone music player. The IP66 rating and the ability to use it as a USB audio device are also very nice bonuses. However, the single audio driver and passive radiator fall a bit short in delivering good bass and soundstaging. If what you’re after is great audio quality, the UE Wonderboom is a better pick for just a little more money. At its current price, the Muvo 2c feels a little too expensive as well.

Creative has an alternative called the Muvo 1c priced at Rs. 3,499 which is similar to the 2c in terms of dimensions and driver specifications, but that it lacks the microSD card slot and USB audio support, and is only available in one colour in India.

If you don’t mind compromising on battery life, the Muvo 2c is decent-sounding and versatile Bluetooth speaker.

Price (MRP): Rs 4,999

Pros

  • Compact and rugged body
  • Crisp vocals and treble
  • Varied usage modes
  • IP66 water- and dust-resistant

Cons

  • Exposed radiator
  • Mediocre battery life
  • Flaky apps

Rating (Out of 5)

  • Design: 3.5
  • Performance: 3.5
  • Value for money: 3.5
  • Overall: 3.5

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]