REVIEW: FlexPod, Oracle Exalogic converged-infrastructure gear

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Two top makers of converged infrastructure devices – FlexPod and Oracle Exalogic – rank well among their users, but they have important differences, according to customers who have used the products.

In this review, real users who are members of the IT Central Station community weigh the pros and cons of each solution, sharing their insights and feedback with other enterprise tech professionals. They outline each solution’s valuable features, but also suggest where they see room for improvement.

[ Check out our What is hyperconvergence? and learn whether your network and team are up to hyperconverged storage. ]

The two vendors compete in the area of converged infrastructure, in which a single box comprises networking, storage, compute and server virtualization. It’s hardware-driven, so that each component can be separated and used independently from the other components.

Nokia 8 Review

Nokia 8 Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Nokia 8 marks the return of the brand to the big league
  • The big marketing feature is its Dual Sight camera aka ‘bothie’ mode
  • Nokia 8 price in India is Rs. 36,999

HMD Global announced the re-entry of the Nokia brand in the mobile market late last year, and the Nokia 6 became the first phone to be unveiled under the new arrangement. This was followed by the launch of the Nokia 5 and the Nokia 3, with the focus very much on the entry-level segment. That changed in August when the Nokia 8 was unveiled at a special event in London. This device is the realisation of a long-held dream of many enthusiasts – a Nokia-branded Android smartphone with flagship-class specifications.

The Nokia 8 packs the Snapdragon 835 SoC – a chip that nearly all current-generation Android flagships are built around – and comes with near-stock Android. That means there’s little room for differentiation in terms of specifications or software. Instead, like many other OEMs, HMD is pinning its hopes on the camera to act as the big selling proposition for its most expensive smartphone till date.

To that end, HMD has revived Nokia’s iconic partnership with Carl Zeiss AG – the brand that lent its name to many famous Nokia camera phones back in the day – for the front and rear cameras of the Nokia 8. The phone also packs some new tricks like the ability to capture ‘bothies’ and record spatial 360O audio thanks to technology borrowed from Nokia’s Ozo camera. Is that enough to make the Nokia 8 stand out in a crowded market? Let’s find out.

Nokia 8 design and display

At first glance, there’s nothing striking about the Nokia 8, especially from the front. It has a fairly standard design, with the 5.3-inch display dominating most of the front, and thin, yet noticeable borders on the left and right. Below the display is the oval home button with a built-in fingerprint scanner, flanked by the capacitive Back and Recent buttons on either side. There’s an earpiece above the display, with a selfie camera to its left and a Nokia logo at the far right. The bottom edge of the Nokia 8 has the Type-C USB 3.1 Gen. 1 port, a mic, and the mono speaker, while the 3.5mm audio port is on top. The SIM/ microSD tray is on the left, and the volume controls and power/ wake button are on the right.

Flip the phone over and things start to get a bit more interesting. The top third has the dual camera module and dual-LED flash lined up in the centre, with ZEISS branding separating them. All this is housed in a small ‘island’ of glass surrounded by an oval-shaped metallic ring that gives the Nokia 8 a tiny camera bump at the back. Another Nokia logo adorns the centre of the phone’s back, and there’s a fair amount of regulatory text towards the bottom, including the ‘Made in India’ tag on our review unit. The antenna bands at the top and bottom blend in nicely with the rest of the phone.

nokia 8 back Nokia 8 ColoursNokia 8 in Tempered Blue (left) and Steel matte finishes.

The Nokia 8’s body is made from 6000-series aluminium, and it comes in glossy Polished Copper and Blue finishes, as well as matte Tempered Blue and Steel options. We got to try both the matte finishes for extended periods of time for our review and found the overall feel and finish to be a notch above other devices in this price segment. We criticised the OnePlus 5 for its uninspiring design in our review, and now, purely in terms of design, it feels extremely dated in comparison to the Nokia 8.

The Nokia 8 has a 5.3-inch QHD IPS LCD screen with a resolution of 1440×2560 pixels that might lack the appeal of an ‘edge to edge’ display, but holds up against the best in the business where it counts. The screen boasts of accurate colour reproduction and it can get really bright when needed, which means using the phone under direct sunlight wasn’t a problem. HMD Global has also used Gorilla Glass 5 for protection.

In the Nokia 8 retail box, you get a 12.5W charger, a USB Type-A to Type-C cable, 3.5mm earphones, a SIM eject tool, and the user guide.

Nokia 8 performance, software, and battery life

As we mentioned earlier, the Nokia 8 is powered by the Snapdragon 835 SoC, which is now standard fare across most Android flagships of this generation. It is backed by 4GB of RAM, 64GB of storage, and a 3090mAh battery, non-removable, of course. India gets the dual-SIM variant of the Nokia 8, but you will have to choose between a Nano-SIM and a microSD card for the second slot. 4G support with VoLTE is available on both SIMs, but only one can be using 4G at any given time.

nokia 8 display Nokia 8 DisplayNokia 8 has a 5.3-inch QHD IPS LCD with Gorilla Glass 5 for protection.

In our experience, call quality was was excellent and 4G connectivity was good even in areas where other phones usually struggle. The mono speaker can get sufficiently loud for calls and even watching videos, and the sound doesn’t break even at maximum volume. However, the placement at the bottom right means you could easily end up covering it while watching a video or playing a game. The Nokia 8 is IP54-rated, which means it’s not waterproof, though you do get protection from water sprays.

The Nokia 8 ships with near-stock Android, with the most noticeable customisations being to the camera app, which we will get to in detail shortly. The lack of software bloat combined with the beefy hardware meant that day to day performance during our review period was a breeze. Multi-tasking wasn’t a problem either, which just goes to show that you don’t need 6GB or 8GB of RAM to make a decent phone. The phone did not get warm even with extended sessions of Breakneck and Asphalt 8, and both games ran without any noticeable issues. In terms of benchmarks, the Nokia 8 was up there with other Snapdragon 835 powered phones.

As we noted at launch, the Nokia 8 has been engineered with an elaborate heat management solution: a copper pipe runs from the upper right corner of the device to the lower left, and is filled with liquid that evaporates in the middle and condenses when it is carried to the edges, in a continuous cycle that carries heat away from the main components. There’s also a graphite layer that transfers the heat to the aluminium unibody uniformly, using a larger surface area to dissipate it to the air.

The Nokia 8 ships with Android 7.1.1 out of the box, which means you get features like App Shortcuts (the ability to initiate actions in apps by long-pressing their icons) and Jump to Camera, the ability to launch the camera app from anywhere (including the lock screen) by double-tapping the power/ lock button. HMD Global has promised updates to Android Oreo and even to next year’s Android P releasefor the Nokia 8 and other smartphones in its current lineup.

Nokia 8 Software Nokia 8 Android VersionAndroid 7.1.1’s App Shortcuts on the Nokia 8 (left). The phone also comes with some motion-triggered shortcuts.

You also get the Glance screen feature, that we saw on Lumia phones back in the day. Your Nokia 8 can display badges for missed calls and unread emails and messages, as well as alarms and calendar appointments on the lock screen. It’s set to timeout one minute after your phone has been set down, but you can change this value to as much as 20 minutes to mimic an ‘always-on’ display. There are a couple of motion-triggered shortcuts as well, though both options are turned off by default. You can turn over your Nokia 8 to reject a call, or have it muted on pickup, if you choose to do so.

In our HD video battery loop test, the Nokia 8 lasted nearly twelve and a half hours, which is pretty impressive. In terms of real-world performance, we didn’t find ourselves reaching for the charger before the end of the day even when our phone usage was heavier than usual. If your experience varies, the bundled 12.5W charger can take the Nokia 8 from an empty tank to a 45 percent charge in 30 minutes, and we also noted it going from 50 percent to 66 percent in just 15 minutes.

Nokia 8 cameras

The Nokia 8 has a dual rear camera setup: a 13-megapixel colour sensor with optical image stabilisation, and a monochrome sensor of the same resolution. While the use of a wide-angle lens and a telephoto lens to offer optical zoom has been been made popular by the likes of Apple, Samsung, and OnePlus, this arrangement is designed to maximise image quality, and has been seen before as well, especially on Honor phones.

How it works is pretty simple: every time you take a photo, two shots are captured – one by the colour sensor and the other by the monochrome sensor – and combined to give you a resulting colour image. The extra information available from the monochrome sensor helps improve the overall contrast and richness of each frame – at least that’s the idea in theory.

We mentioned earlier that the Nokia 8 runs near-stock Android, and it’s the Camera app that’s largely responsible for that “near” prefix. You’ll see a ton of customisations here, most of them to accommodate the underlying camera hardware. The app is set to capture still photos in the ‘Twin’ mode by default, but you can change that to just ‘Colour’ or ‘Mono’ if you so desire. We recommend leaving it in the default mode, unless you are trying to take black and white shots, of course, in which case go with the latter.

Though the camera is backed by phase detection auto-focus (PDAF) and an IR range finder, in our experience, the Nokia 8 took a bit too long to lock focus, which got annoying really quickly. The resulting pictures, however, were good, with the right objects in focus and a good amount of detail as well as accurate colour reproduction, as long as there was plenty of light around us.

Tap to see full-sized Nokia 8 camera samples

In low light conditions, though, the performance of the Nokia 8 suffered, which wasn’t exactly a surprise given the f/2.0 aperture on both cameras. Pictures we shot didn’t have a lot of noise, but they lacked the details that today’s leading smartphone cameras can capture, though, admittedly, most of them are priced higher than the Nokia 8. The rear flash does a good job of lighting up scenes, though the front-facing display flash can be a bit overpowering.

Speaking of which, the Nokia 8 can record 720p, 1080p, or 4K video using both front and rear cameras, though you are limited to 30 frames per second. The quality of videos is decent, and though the microphones seem to do a great job of picking up sounds, we couldn’t discern the difference, if any, made by the Ozo surround sound. You can also record slow-motion and time-lapse videos.

The app also features Live Bokeh and Panorama modes, and the results of both are pretty good. You also get Beautify mode for both the front and rear cameras, complete with varying intensity levels of this ‘beautification’, which is designed to remove ‘blemishes’ from your face – embracing your natural self is clearly so 2014. Controls to toggle HDR mode, the timer, and the flash are available within the main interface for both front and rear cameras, and you can even dive into a fully manual mode with either.

Nokia 8 Camera App Nokia 8 Camera AppThe camera app on the Nokia 8 has been customised to accomodate the underlying hardware.

The app can be a bit confusing at times – for example, you might wonder “Why am I not seeing the ‘switch cameras’ option right now?” The answer is usually the fact that you are in a mode that doesn’t support the option you’re looking for. Switching from Live Bokeh to regular Photos mode, for example, will fix the issue in that scenario. The icon at the bottom indicating the current mode could have been bigger, or having a carousel showing all available modes at any given time like the iPhone and several other phones would perhaps have made it easier to understand what is currently selected.

That brings us to the Dual Sight camera, or to use the marketing term, ‘bothie’ mode. You can take photos and record video with the Nokia 8 where scenes from both the front and the rear camera will be visible at the same time. The unfortunate marketing name aside, this could be a nice way to, say, record your own reactions when your kid is doing something cute. Resulting images are 16:9, instead of 4:3 when capturing stills using a single camera on the Nokia 8 by default (this can also be changed to 16:9 from Settings within the Camera app, if you want).

We’ve seen third-party apps and other Android phones do this before, but what HMD is really pushing here is the ability to livestream bothie (and indeed ‘regular’) videos to Facebook and YouTube right from within the camera app. The company says it worked closely with Qualcomm to be the first to push this feature out, but you can expect it to be available on other smartphones soon.

We can imagine this feature being useful when you are at, say, a concert, or if you are a reporter covering a live event, when you want to capture both sides of the story. The streaming feature worked as advertised, though we should note that you might need to verify your YouTube account and enable live streaming manually to stream to Google’s platform. Extended bothie streaming sessions can warm up the back of the phone considerably, which is a sign that the heat management solution we described earlier is doing its job.

Tap to see full-sized Nokia 8 bothie sample

Quality of photos and videos taken in bothie mode is decent, but not as good as you can capture when using the individual cameras normally. Note that there is no way to use the bothie mode outside of the stock Camera app at the moment.

Verdict
Nokia made its name selling no-nonsense phones that were built to last, and while the ownership of the mobile brand might have changed hands, the Nokia 8 is a smartphone that would have been a worthy addition to the lineup of the Finnish company even in its heyday. It offers good build quality, a great display, excellent performance with stock Android, the promise of regular updates, first-class battery life, and good cameras with some neat tricks. On the flip-side, some might find the design boring, it isn’t fully waterproof like many competitors are, and the low-light camera performance could’ve been better.

Priced at Rs. 36,999, the Nokia 8 goes up against the likes of the OnePlus 5 (Review), and overall, we found it to be the better of the two, despite the latter sporting better specifications on paper. If you are on a tighter budget, you could also consider the Honor 8 Pro (Review), which has a similar dual-camera setup and is a solid all-round performer as well.

Expectedly, the overall experience with the Nokia 8 isn’t as polished as it is with some of the more expensive Android smartphones such as the HTC U11 (Review) and Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and Note 8flagships, but it’s safe to say that if a smartphone like this had shipped from the Nokia stable a few years ago, the Finnish company might never have had to step back from the mobile business. As for taking on the likes of Samsung and Apple at their own game, there’s the rumoured Nokia 9 to look forward to.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Kult Gladiator Review

Kult Gladiator Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Kult Gladiator sports a 5.5-inch HD display
  • It is powered by a MediaTek 6737 SoC and has 3GB of RAM
  • Camera performance suffers in low light

Some smartphone companies try to make a mark with high-end flagships, but the entry-level segment is still where most of the action is, and plenty of companies focus only on the low-end. Kult is one such brand, and has been launching a steady stream of such products for a while now. Interestingly, Kult is a brand from Optiemus Group, the same company that is now behind BlackBerry in India. The Kult Gladiator is a recently launched model that is priced at Rs. 6,999 and boasts of some decent specs. Let’s see how it compares to the big names, and whether this is a good budget smartphone to pick.

Kult Gladiator design

One look at the Gladiator and we can say that the device looks quite premium. Kult has used metal in its construction and the phone has a metal backplate between plastic end caps. Sadly, there are variations in the finishes, and the plastic is curved while the metal panel has chamfered edges. The Gladiator is available in black, and while we like the finish, we must say that it picks up fingerprints easily. Hold it in hand and the first thing you notice is the weight of the phone. At 180g, this is among the heavyweights in its price range.

The Gladiator has a 5.5-inch display at the front, with on-screen buttons for navigation. It has an 8-megapixel selfie camera along with a selfie flash. The earpiece is recessed and might pick up pocket lint easily. The power and volume buttons are positioned on the right, and while the power button is easy to hit, the volume buttons require you to stretch your thumb. At the back, there’s a 13-megapixel camera with an LED flash and a fingerprint scanner positioned below it. The Micro-USB port and the 3.5mm headphone socket are positioned on the top.

Kult Gladiator Bottom NDTV Kult Gladiator

At first, it seems as though the Gladiator has a sealed unibody, but on closer inspection you see a tab to pop the back open. The rear is removable, and gives access to the SIM slots and dedicated microSD card slot. However, the 4000mAh battery is non-removable. To charge it, Kult has provided a 7.5W charger in the box.

Kult Gladiator specifications and software

Like most other manufacturers, Kult has stuck to a fairly common configuration for the Gladiator. It is powered by a MediaTek MT6737 quad-core processor with all four cores clocked at 1.25GHz. There is 3GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage which is expandable using a microSD card of up to 32GB.

The 5.5-inch display sports a 720p resolution which works out to a density of 267ppi. The Kult Gladiator is a dual-SIM device and has two Micro-SIM slots. There is 4G support on both SIM cards but only one SIM can access the 4G network at a time while the second SIM is restricted to 2G speeds. For connectivity, there is Bluetooth 4.0, WiFi b/g/n, and USB-OTG.

Kult Gladiator Back NDTV Kult Gladiator Review

Software was until recently a constant issue with low-end Android smartphones, and they often shipped with severely outdated versions of Android. The Gladiator runs Android Nougat which isn’t the absolute latest but is still mainstream. Kult hasn’t done a lot of customisation to the UI, and you get a stock Android experience. Other than a few Google apps preinstalled, we could only find Opera Mini and Vistoso, a photo editing app which lets users print edited photos onto t-shirts and coffee mugs. With the phone relatively bloat-free, there was roughly 20GB of storage available to the end-user.

Kult Gladiator performance, battery life, and cameras

There’s one word to describe our experience with the Kult Gladiator: average. Colour reproduction is decent and you do get the option to tweak the output. However, viewing angles aren’t all that great. We saw a shift in colours when looking at the screen at an angle. Sunlight legibility is also just about average, and you might have to shield the screen with one hand when using this phone outdoors. The fingerprint scanner was quick to unlock the phone.

The hardware is similar to that of other smartphones in this price range, and so are the benchmark scores. The Kult Gladiator managed to score 2,923 in AnTuTu, as well as 549 and 1540 in Geekbench’s single-core and multi-core tests respectively. In GFXBench, the phone managed only 11fps. While these are relatively decent numbers, the real-world usage experience is what matters. Apps took a lot longer to load than we expected, and there were occasional slow-downs.

Kult Gladiator Camera NDTV Kult Gladiator Review

The gaming experience was similar, as big titles like Real Racing 3 took a long time to load. We also noticed the phone dropping frames occasionally. We also played Clash Royale which is light on graphics but network-intensive, and found that it drained the battery much faster than Real Racing. If you are into online multiplayer games, you might want to keep an eye on the battery level.

Battery life is where we expected the phone to deliver its best scores, because of its 4000mAh battery. However, in our HD video loop test, the phone survived for 9 hours and 43 minutes before throwing in the towel. This is a lot less than the similarly configured Intex Elyt-e7 (Review), which managed 12 hours and 18 minutes under similar conditions. The Gladiator will deliver one day of battery life with light use, but charging does take a long time when using the supplied 7.5W charger.

Kult has used a very basic camera app and you have limited modes to play with. You get panorama, video, photo and beauty modes, plus an HDR toggle. You also get a shortcut to the Vistoso app built into the camera app. One issue we had with the camera is that you can’t take multiple shots rapidly. Photos taken with the Gladiator in daylight turned out well, with nice details and decent colours. However, performance is disappointing in low light. This phone takes a while to save photos, and you’ll also need a steady hand if you want usable shots. We saw ghosting in a few of our samples. Noise is kept low, but details are not brought out well at all.

The front camera takes usable photos but you’ll need to hold the phone steady, especially in low light. HDR can be turned on for the front camera as well, and we found the selfie flash to be helpful in low-light conditions. Video recording resolution maxes out at 720p for both cameras. Automatic refocusing takes some time, but you can tap the screen to force it. There is an option to enable electronic stabilisation for both cameras, but we did not see any significant difference in the output.

Verdict

The Kult Gladiator offers decent hardware and software for the segment it is positioned in. The processor and RAM are enough to offer a steady, usable experience. However, this phone’s cameras aren’t that great, and battery life is disappointing. Overall, it is a decent device but this is a very crowded market, and we would recommend that you have a look at our top picks before making a buying decision.

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Kult Gladiator

Kult Gladiator

Rs.6,999
Buy
  • REVIEW
  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Stock Android
  • Decent camera performance in daylight
  • Dedicated microSD card slot
  • Bad
  • Photo quality suffers in low light
  • Battery performance could be better
  • Screen viewing angles aren’t great
BUY AT
  • Kult Gladiator (Black, 32GB) –
    Rs.6,999

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Canon EOS 77D Review

Canon EOS 77D Review

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The EOS 77D features a 24.2-megapixel sensor and 45 autofocus points
  • ISO performance is very good and the Dual Pixel AF works well
  • The Canon EOS 77D is priced at Rs. 59,995 for the body only

Earlier this year, Canon refreshed its mirrorless and enthusiast-level DSLR lineup with the introduction of the EOS M6, EOS 77D, and EOS 800D. Going by Canon’s numbering scheme, the new 77D and 800D DSLRs are aimed at beginners with some enthusiast-level features for when they master the craft over time. The new models also make some higher-end features, like the Dual Pixel autofocus system, more accessible to users.

Today, we’ll be testing the EOS 77D, which slots in just below the EOS 80D and above the 800D. The EOS 77D and EOS 800D are priced within Rs. 10,000 of each other and are very similar in terms of features, except that the 800D lacks a secondary LCD and a few shortcut buttons, which is one of the reasons it costs less.

Let’s see if the Canon EOS 77D makes a strong case for itself as a value-minded semi-enthusiast DSLR.

 

Canon EOS 77D design and build quality

The 77D has a plastic body which, at 540 grams, is lighter than that of the 80D. There are rubber grips on either side for your palms and another at the back for your thumb. This model lacks any form of weather sealing but we found that it can handle a light drizzle without any fuss.

On the left side, we have flaps covering the remote control terminal, external mic socket, Micro-HDMI port, and an old-styled Mini-USB port. The NFC contact point for pairing is also placed here. The mode dial is placed on the top left of the camera with a locking system, and a power switch that lets you jump straight to video mode. The optical viewfinder uses a pentamirror to reflect light from the lens to the viewfinder rather than a pentaprism, which is generally heavier and more expensive to implement. We also have a hot shoe terminal and a built-in pop-up flash above the viewfinder. An infrared sensor turns the LCD off when you bring the camera up to your eye.

Canon 77D flip lcd ndtv canon 77d

To the right of the viewfinder, we have another cluster of buttons for live view, AF-On, and magnification. A second control dial lower down also doubles up as a four-way navigation pad. The multi-function lock switch at the bottom can be used to lock the primary or secondary dials or the touchscreen. The secondary LCD lets you check settings like ISO, aperture, shutter speed, battery level, and the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth status at a quick glance. The articulating 3-inch LCD has a 1,040k dot resolution and supports two-finger multi touch input. The touchscreen can be used for changing settings in the menu and viewing pictures.

We received an 18-135mm EFS lens with the body, which can be bought as a bundle from Canon. The lens features a built-in image stabiliser, aperture of f/3.5-5.6, and a switch to lock the lens when not in use.

Canon EOS 77D features and specifications

The Canon 77D features a 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor with Canon’s new DIGIC 7 image processor. Light sensitivity ranges from ISO 100 to 25,600, shutter speed ranges from 30 to 1/4,000 seconds, and the burst shooting tops out at 6fps. The camera has 45 autofocus points, all of which are cross-type, along with phase detection pixels on the sensor for video and live view. The latter is what enables the 77D to seamlessly switch focus between subjects when shooting video, which is a big advantage compared to most DSLRs which rely on the contrast detection AF system alone. Unfortunately, video recording maxes out at 1080p at 60fps, which is a bit disappointing.

Canon 77D top LCD ndtv canon 77d

Some of the notable improvements however lie in the firmware. The Canon 77D has something called ‘Guided Mode’, which can be enabled for the shooting screen, menus, and the mode guide. This gives you a visual representation of what you can expect from shots based on which way you adjust the slider. So for instance, say you’re shooting in aperture priority mode, the graphical representation on the screen shows you what sort of effect you can expect by decreasing or increasing the aperture. This encourages you to use the touchscreen, by making the icons larger and easier to use.

Hitting the ‘Q’ button at the back gives you quick access to toggles including white balance, drive mode, picture size, metering, type of focus, etc. You can either use the touchscreen or either of the two dials to manipulate the settings.

The Creative Filters option on the mode dial lets you add effects such as soft focus, fish-eye, etc to your photos. You even get special filters for video like a film-grain effect, miniature, black and white, and more. The Custom Functions option in the menu lets you access features like the expanded ISO mode, which bumps up the maximum ISO to 51,200; adjust the level of exposure increments (one-third or half); toggle the state of the AF assist beam; and more.

Canon 77D dial ndtv canon 77d

Canon EOS 77D performance and battery life

We begin with the ISO test to gauge how this camera handles noise when the ISO level is pushed upwards. It’s also a good indicator of how the camera performs in low light. One thing to keep in mind is that the Canon 77D only allows ISO jumps at full stops, and you cannot make adjustments by one-third or half a stop. We start at ISO 800 as there’s no discernible difference in image quality between ISO 100 and that level. Sharpness goes down a notch at ISO 3200 but the image is still noise-free. At ISO 6400, we begin seeing a small amount of noise in the shadows. At the highest ISO level, details start to deteriorate but there’s still no visible chroma noise, which is quite impressive.

Canon EOS 77D ISO test – tap to see full-sized image

The EOS 77D works with the Canon Connect app for Android and iOS, for remote shooting and transferring files to your smartphone. Even when paired using Bluetooth, the camera will need a Wi-Fi connection to your device, even if you want to simply view the photos on the camera. With the dedicated Wi-Fi button, you can jump to a list of previously paired devices or set up connections to a Wi-Fi printer, a desktop PC (through the EOS utility), or a cloud service through the Canon iMAGE Gateway. This is the same as we saw when reviewing the Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II .

The buttons on the Canon 77D have good tactile feedback and fall in place under your fingers nicely. The power lever felt a bit stiff and rough, but other than this, we didn’t have any issues with usability. The fact that there’s no headphone socket might frustrate those who want to use this camera for professional recording.

Canon EOS 77D sample: ISO 640, f/4.56, 1/60sec, 35mm (tap to see full-sized image)

Canon EOS 77D sample: ISO 1250, f/5.66, 1/128sec, 93mm (tap to see full-sized image)

In daylight, the 77D does a good job of capturing accurate colours and good detail. We found that the 18-135mm lens isn’t all that sharp, and this is evident in the slightly soft macro shots we got. There is very mild chromatic aberration in some scenes but it’s mostly kept in check. Thankfully, we didn’t have trouble with other artifacts like barrel distortion in our pictures.

Canon EOS 77D ‘Grainy B/W’ sample: ISO 6400, f/5.6, 1/80sec, 135mm (tap to see full-sized image)

The Creative filters are where you can really have some fun. ‘HDR art standard’ combines three consecutive exposures to give you an HDR photo, while ‘HDR art bold’ boosts colours to give you an oil painting effect. ‘Grainy B/W’ is another effect (seen above) which we found quite useful. There are similar effects for videos too, which add a fun element to shooting. Burst mode works well although 6fps isn’t ideal for fast-moving animals or birds. The camera’s high ISO prowess can be seen in low-light shots. Details were maintained fairly well and noise was kept to a minimum even when we had the ISO set to Auto.

Canon EOS 77D sample: ISO 800, f/4.5, 1/25sec, 35mm (tap to see full-sized image)

Canon EOS 77D sample: ISO 100, f/18.2, 16sec, 24mm (tap to see full-sized image)

The 77D has good video capabilities thanks to the Dual Pixel AF system. Autofocus mode includes subject tracking, smooth zone AF, and 1-point AF. Subject tracking works decently, but if your subject’s motion is too erratic then the camera has a tough time keeping up. The phase detection system shifts focus between subjects smoothly, without any focus hunting lag, or the irritating motor sound that plagues most DSLRs. You can use the touchscreen to shift focus too. Another neat feature is electronic image stabilisation, which has two levels. With it enabled, frames are cropped a bit but the end result is more stable footage.

The 77D is rated at 600 shots per charge and we managed to come close to this number during our review period, but features like Wi-Fi and Bluetooth do have an impact here. Your mileage will vary drastically depending on if you have these features on or not.

Canon 77D hand ndtv canon

Verdict

The Canon EOS 77D is a feature-packed DSLR that’s positioned just below the EOS 80D in Canon’s lineup. If you don’t need the secondary display on the top or the second control dial at the back, then the slightly less expensive 800D could serve you just as well, as its features are pretty much identical to those of the 77D. New additions like the guided mode and Dual Pixel autofocus are great to have, but we also wish that this camera supported more current-day features like 4K video recording and maybe finer controls over the ISO level.

The Canon 77D gives you all the flexibility of a DSLR plus good battery life and a variety of inexpensive lenses to choose from, and video performance is also much better now.  If you buy this camera with the 18-135mm kit lens, the price shoots up to Rs. 89,995, which feels a bit too expensive. While the lens is versatile enough for close-up and long-range shooting, we would have liked more sharpness in our images. If video is what you’re after then you should consider a mirrorless camera like the Sony A6300, which retails for around Rs. 67,000. It doesn’t have the best battery life or a very user-friendly interface like the 77D, but you do get much better video capabilities like 4K recording, much faster autofocus, and burst mode.

Price: Rs. 59,995 (body only)

Pros

  • Very good high-ISO performance
  • Built-in Wi-Fi
  • Fast autofocus for video
  • Decent battery life
  • Novice-friendly interface

Cons

  • No 4K video recording
  • Basic ISO adjustments
  • Burst shooting isn’t impressive

Ratings (Out of 5)

  • Build/Design: 4
  • Image Quality: 4
  • Video quality: 4
  • Performance: 3.5
  • Value For money: 3.5
  • Overall: 3.5

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