Kevin Spacey just got fired from Ridley Scott’s new movie, a month before its release

Ridley Scott will completely remove Kevin Spacey from his upcoming biopic thriller All the Money in the World — with fewer than two months to go until the movie’s scheduled December 22 release.

According to Deadline, which first reported the news, Christopher Plummer will replace Spacey in the film’s most prominent supporting role. Scott’s drastic choice to cut Spacey from the movie will put it at risk of missing its December 22 release date, thus jeopardizing its Oscar eligibility.

The news follows a wave of sexual assault allegations made against Spacey by more than a dozen people, including multiple accusations of assault on underage victims.

Based on a true story, All the Money in the World details the harrowing 1973 kidnapping of J. Paul Getty’s 16-year-old grandson, J. Paul Getty III (Charlie Plummer, no relation), and Getty’s refusal to comply with the kidnappers’ demands. Spacey was set to play the elder Getty, and the decision to reshoot his role entirely, especially so close to the film’s release date, is extremely unprecedented.

The decision to cut Spacey from the film indicates how drastically Hollywood is reacting to the allegations against the actor

Though there have been other historical instances where an actor has been replaced during a film’s production, recasting a role or conducting extensive reshoots after a film has wrapped is rare, and usually only happens to this extent in the case of an unexpected death — for example, Paul Walker’s brothers standing in for reshoots of Furious 7 after his death.

That Scott and the All the Money in the World’s producers are willing to go to such lengths to essentially erase Spacey’s presence from the film speaks to how seriously Hollywood is taking the allegations of sexual assault that have been levied against him — or at least how desperate many people in the entertainment industry are to distance themselves from a man whose behavior was allegedly a longstanding open secret.

The decision comes after the film’s production studio, TriStar, abandoned what would have been an aggressive marketing and awards season campaign built around Spacey’s performance. The studio additionally pulled the film from what would have been an Oscar-bait slot at the American Film Institute’s November film festival. Regarding that decision, TriStar issued a statement, noting, “All the Money in the World is a superb film … But given the current allegations surrounding one of its actors and out of respect for those impacted, it would be inappropriate to celebrate at a gala at this difficult time.”

All the Money in the World features an ensemble cast including Michelle Williams and Mark Wahlberg. According to Deadline, the decision to replace Spacey and reshoot all of his scenes was “unanimous” among the film’s cast and crew.

Vox has reached out to Spacey’s representatives for comment.

Source:-VOX

Destiny 2 Reviews: Release Day Impressions Roundup

Image result for Destiny 2 Reviews: Release Day Impressions Roundup

Destiny 2 has officially launched, and soon it will be available worldwide. Full reviews won’t arrive just yet, but reviews-in-progress have started to pop up around the internet based on a recent three-day event in Seattle.

The much-anticipated sequel doesn’t radically shake up the Destiny formula, instead opting primarily to refine and improve the core of the first game. You can see our breakdown of Destiny 2’s five biggest changes for a basic idea of what to expect.

Below, you’ll find a collection of various critics’ impressions of the game so far. In GameSpot’s Destiny 2 review in progress, Kallie Plagge calls the story a “clear improvement over Destiny’s much-maligned storytelling,” adding that “Destiny 2 builds on the original in smart ways that make me excited to keep playing.” We’ve also more recently published a Destiny 2 review diarythat offers more of Kallie’s thoughts now that the game is live.

  • Game: Destiny 2
  • Developer / Publisher: Bungie / Activision
  • Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC
  • Release: September 6 (PS4/Xbox One), October 24 (PC)
  • Price: US $60 / £50 / AU $100

GameSpot

“Of course, all of this still feels like Destiny. The new social space, the Farm, is functionally the same as the Tower in the original. Finding loot and switching out your old gear still takes up a significant portion of your time. Enemies have been tweaked, but they’re not wildly different, either. That’s not necessarily bad, but it also makes me wonder if I’ll see Destiny 2 as a sequel, rather than a half-step forward, the longer I play and the more I grind and repeat.” — Kallie Plagge [Full review in progress]

“Though I’ve only replayed things I’ve already done, I’m still excited about Destiny 2. I can’t wait to find my next exotic weapon, but I’m also looking forward to completing more Adventure missions and learning more about the world. My next step is to finish the story, reach level 20, and run some Strikes, so check back soon for more impressions.” — Kallie Plagge [Destiny 2 review diary]

Polygon

“At the very least, what I’ve played of Destiny 2 is an incredibly promising start. In plain English, it feels like Destiny without all the bulls***. It seems like the sequel Bungie needed to make–not a fundamentally different experience, but improved enough over its predecessor to reel veterans back in and attract people who skipped the original Destiny. Now we have to see how it holds up.” — Samit Sarkar [Full review in progress]

IGN

“My initial impressions leave me with more questions than answers. Is the story going to stay engaging through the end? Are the great drops going to get stingier at higher levels? Am I going to get bored exploring the new destinations? We’ll have to answer those hanging questions later, but based on what I’ve experienced so far, Destiny 2 hasn’t disappointed my high expectations as a fan of the original. There have been deliberate steps to improve the moment-to-moment experience, be it something as simple as bringing up the next task with the press of a button or by keeping you constantly climbing the Light ladder without realizing it with enticing dynamic events. That’s all on top of a story the team at Bungie knew they had to get right after the convoluted mess of the first game which forced you to read Grimoire cards on a website to experience the original story. So far it seems as though they’ve succeeded.” — Destin Legarie [Full review in progress]

Rolling Stone

“However, what’s remarkable about the structure of Destiny 2–aside from it having a real central plot–is that it achieves what the first Destiny tried but ultimately failed to do: it gives the player freedom. Yes, there’s some linearity to the Red War missions and the order in which the destinations are introduced–but you can spend the bulk of your time wherever you’re most comfortable, where you find combat encounters most fulfilling, or where the rewards on offer are most appealing to you.” — Alex Kane [Full impressions]

Ars Technica

“I am not at an ideal state to issue anything resembling a verdict. But I at least feel safe declaring this: I entered the event perturbed that I would play so much Destiny 2 and not get to transfer that progress to the final, retail version. Now, I am anxious to dive back in and try again. I want to flex the muscles of an entirely different class. I want to devote far more attention to so much in-mission dialogue and exposition. Above all else, I want to group up with some friends and see how the ‘always a battle around every corner’ sensation feels when I have some persistent fireteam members at my side.” — Sam Machkovech [Full pre-review]

DualShockers

“So far, Destiny 2 has improved upon the original Destiny in every way. There’s a Pierce Brosnan-impersonating sniper who serves as your faction representative for the European Dead Zone. There’s new enemy types, including staff-wielding Fallen Wretches and caped-flaming-crossbow-wielding Hive Knights. There are cutscenes where The Speaker, who never really had much to say, is actually a savage and disses Ghaul in rap-battle proportions during cutscenes. When I sat down to play this game I had one mission for Bungie: prove to me that Destiny 2 isn’t just another expansion. Thankfully, it turns out that Destiny 2 has listened to the fans and has taken a look in the mirror: the product is one that I–so far–thoroughly enjoy.” — Noah Buttner [Full review impressions]

[“Source-gamespot”]

Honor Play Pad 2 Tablet Launched: Price, Release Date, Specifications, and More

Honor Play Pad 2 Tablet Launched: Price, Release Date, Specifications, and More

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Honor Play Pad 2 comes in two display sizes but same specifications
  • The tablet is available in 8-inch and 9.6-inch IPS display variants
  • It will go on sale first in China next month

Huawei Terminal brand Honor on Tuesday launched the Honor 6A smartphone and the Honor Band A2 fitness tracker. Alongside, it also launched two new tablets – the Honor Play Pad 2 (8-inch) and Honor Play Pad 2 (9.6-inch). Both tablets will be available in Wi-Fi only and 4G LTE variants, as well as different memory/ storage models, from June 1 in China.

As for pricing, the Honor Play Pad 2 (8-inch) is priced at CNY 799 for the 2GB RAM/ 32GB storage Wi-Fi only model, CNY 999 for the 2GB RAM/ 32GB storage LTE model, and CNY 1,299 for the 3GB RAM/ 32GB storage LTE model. The Honor Play Pad (9.6-inch) on the other hand is priced at CNY 999, CNY 1,299, and CNY 1,499 for the same models respectively. Both tablets also support voice calling.honor play pad 2 gold honor

Apart from the display sizes, the specifications of the Honor Play Pad 2 (8-inch) and Honor Play Pad 2 (9.6-inch) tablets are identical. Both tablets sport a screen resolution of 1280×800 pixels, and both sport IPS displays. They run on quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 425 SoCs with either 2GB or 3GB of RAM. The tablets can have their inbuilt storage expanded via microSD card (up to 128GB).

Both the Honor Play Pad 2 (8-inch) and Honor Play Pad 2 (9.6-inch) sport 5-megapixel rear cameras and 2-megapixel front-facing cameras. Connectivity options include 4G LTE, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth v4.1, GPS/ A-GPS, and a Micro-USB port. Both tablets sport 4800mAh batteries. As for form factor, the 8-inch tablet measures 211.07×124.65×7.95mm and weighs 350 grams, while the 9.6-inch tablet measures 229.8×159.8×7.95mm and weighs 460 grams.

 

Huawei Honor Play Pad 2 (8-inch)

Huawei Honor Play Pad 2 (8-inch)

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

8.00-inch

Processor

quad-core

Front Camera

2-megapixel

Resolution

800×1280 pixels

RAM

2GB

OS

Android 7.0

Storage

16GB

Rear Camera

5-megapixel

Battery Capacity

4800mAh

Also See
  • Huawei Honor T1 7.0 (Silver, 8GB ,Wi-Fi+ 3G+Voice Calling) –
    Rs. 6,948
Huawei Honor Play Pad 2 (9.6-inch)

Huawei Honor Play Pad 2 (9.6-inch)

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

9.60-inch

Processor

quad-core

Front Camera

2-megapixel

Resolution

800×1280 pixels

RAM

2GB

OS

Android 7.0

Storage

16GB

Rear Camera

5-megapixel

Battery Capacity

4800mAh

Also See
  • Huawei Honor T1 7.0 (Silver, 8GB ,Wi-Fi+ 3G+Voice Calling) –
    Rs. 6,948
Huawei Honor Play Pad 2 (8-inch) LTE

Huawei Honor Play Pad 2 (8-inch) LTE

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

8.00-inch

Processor

quad-core

Front Camera

2-megapixel

Resolution

800×1280 pixels

RAM

2GB

OS

Android 7.0

Storage

16GB

Rear Camera

5-megapixel

Battery Capacity

4800mAh

Also See
  • Huawei Honor T1 7.0 (Silver, 8GB ,Wi-Fi+ 3G+Voice Calling) –
    Rs. 6,948
Huawei Honor Play Pad 2 (9.6-inch) LTE

Huawei Honor Play Pad 2 (9.6-inch) LTE

  • KEY SPECS
  • NEWS

Display

9.60-inch

Processor

quad-core

Front Camera

2-megapixel

Resolution

800×1280 pixels

RAM

2GB

OS

Android 7.0

Storage

16GB

Rear Camera

5-megapixel

Battery Capacity

4800mAh

Also See
  • Huawei Honor T1 7.0 (Silver, 8GB ,Wi-Fi+ 3G+Voice Calling) –
    Rs. 6,948

[“Source-ndtv”]

Samsung will soon announce official release date for Galaxy S8

Samsung has already given its word about the Galaxy S8 earlier, saying that the flagship will not be launched at Mobile World Congress 2017. However, Samsung has also said this does not mean that the company will be skipping the MWC this year. According to the number of hints we have to till now, the company is most likely to announce its new tablet called the Galaxy Tab S3 with S Pen.

Related: Samsung Galaxy S8’s AI assistant – Bixby to support 8 languages

For those who were sad about Galaxy S8 not being unveiled at MWC, there is a good news that has come across today. Koh Dong-jin, president of mobile communications at Samsung, said that the “official schedule” for the phone will be announced at this year’s Mobile World Congress.

As we already know, Samsung has scheduled its press event on February 26 but MWC but February 27 is the official date when MWC 2017 starts. It is being said that the company will unveil the Tab S3 on February 26 and reveal the some details about the Galaxy S8 on February 27.

According to leaks that surfaced earlier, the Galaxy S8 will be made official on March 29 in New York, and will go on sale on April 21. Samsung has not made any official statement regarding this as of now, we have to wait and see what comes up on the first day of MWC.

When it comes to specifications, Samsung Galaxy S8 is rumored to have 2 variants. The regular variant will have a 5.8-inch and the plus variant will come with a bigger 6.2-inch scree. It is highly possible that the Galaxy S8 will run on Snapdragon 835 along with wither 6GB or 4GB of RAM.

Read: Samsung Galaxy S8- release date and everything you should know

After the failure of Galaxy Note 7, most of us have high expectations from Samsung Galaxy S8. This is Samsung’s chance to fix the damage done in the past, and Galaxy S8 is the perfect device to do this job. All we can do is to wait for February 27 and see what is comes out of the mystery box.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]