Samsung Exynos 9 Series 9810 SoC Launched, Based on 10nm FinFET Process

Samsung Exynos 9 Series 9810 SoC Launched, Based on 10nm FinFET Process

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Samsung unveils the Exynos 9 Series 9810 SoC
  • It is likely to debut on the company’s Galaxy S9
  • The chipset can be expected to feature on phones next year

Samsung has announced a new flagship mobile processor in the Exynos 9 series, built on the 10nm process. As is traditional with such unveils, it can be expected that the new new Exynos 9 Series 9810 SoC will be the processor powering the company’s next flagship smartphone, the Galaxy S9.

The Samsung Exynos 9810 packs the company’s third-generation custom CPU cores and also comes with an upgraded GPU. Samsung is also touting support for Gigabit LTE modem which can offer what Samsung calls industry’s first 6CA (carrier aggregation) support. Samsung says that the new Exynos 9 Series 9810 SoC has been built on second-generation 10nm process technology.

The Exynos 9 Series is said to be the company’s first processor chipset built on the 10-nanometre FinFET process technology.

The South Korean company earlier this year unveiled its premium application processor, the Exynos 9 Series 8895. Some of the highlights of the Exynos 9 Series 8895 processor were embedding of a Gigabit LTE modem that can support five carrier aggregation, or 5CA. It supports LTE Cat. 16 with download speeds of up to 1Gbps and upload speeds of up to 150Mbps (Cat. 13). The chipset was used in the Samsung Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ as well as the company’s Galaxy Note 8 phablet.

Rumours have pointed to early next year launch of the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 SoC which could be seen as the competitor to the Exynos 9 Series 9810 SoC. The Snapdragon 845 SoC is said to be built on a new faster, more efficient 7nm fabrication process. Furthermore, the new Qualcomm SoC is also said to debut on the Galaxy S9 next year.

For Samsung’s upcoming flagships, the company is widely expected to retain Infinity Displays which allow the 5.8-inch and 6.2-inch screens to come with a relatively compact factor. The upcoming Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+ smartphones are rumoured to use the same screen sizes as well as the same curved design first seen on the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

WeTransfer’s Plan To Disrupt The Creative Process

Enter your email address. Read the fine print. Sign up. Login. Exit out of the pop-up. Most digital services force you to take several steps before you can actually do what you came to the site to do. But at WeTransfer–a file-sharing service designed for creatives–the user experience has always been about getting out of the way. Now the company is growing into its next act to become a service that facilitates the entire creative process–by applying its UX philosophy to advertising, editorial, and a new mobile app.

[Image: courtesy WeTransfer]

“What we would like more than anything is to keep people in their work flow,” Damian Bradfield, U.S. president and chief marketing officer of WeTransfer, says. “Those who produce work know what it’s like to be in that moment of flow, when work is pouring out of you. There’s nothing worse than being pulled out of it or being disrupted. That’s what we wanted from a service. There’s no sign up, it’s a lean data policy, no intrusive advertising, no banners, no pop-ups, no irritation.”

[Image: courtesy WeTransfer]

When users send a file through the site, there’s no sign up necessary to use the free service. (But there is a premium version that charges a fee.) Every step in the file-transfer process happens in a compact box on the home page. The attractive background is a full-bleed image of either an ad (produced in house), an editorial (curated and authored by WeTransfer), or wallpaper. All share similar aesthetics. They’re eye-catching enough to get your attention, but so consistent in their sensibility, that you could gloss over them entirely if you wanted and go about business as usual, undistracted.

[Image: courtesy WeTransfer]

Earlier this week, WeTransfer launched a new, free mobile app that builds on this approach. Before, the company’s app was essentially a mobile version of the desktop site–a file-sharing tool. Now it’s Pinterest-like. Users can create mood boards and collect the links they read, photos they take, and music they hear all in one place.Dutch creatives Bas Berens and Ronald Hans (who goes by the name Nalden) founded WeTransfer in 2009 with the idea of creating the file-sharing service they wanted, but didn’t exist. Today, it has 40 million active users; 75% of whom identify as creatives. Every month WeTransfer sends 1 billion files and its ads achieve a click-through rate that’s two-and-a-half times higher than the industry average–a rate the company believes it receives because its treats advertising like art. (You could argue this is a dark pattern because the ads look so similar to WeTransfer’s editorial and other wallpapers.)

Unlike most tech companies that take on venture funding early on, WeTransfer bootstrapped itself to profitability, which it reached in 2014. Without investor-added pressure to meet certain growth goals, the company had the freedom to focus on UX and crafting the brand it wanted. Proving that its approach found the audience it wanted, WeTransfer was able to get a $25 million dollar investment from Highland Capital in 2015. Now it’s in expansion mode. In December 2016, the company hired a new CEO, Gordon Willoughby, who was previously at Amazon.

[Image: courtesy WeTransfer]

“We don’t necessarily get that excited about the concept of mass storage and synchronization,” Bradfield says. “The future, and the things that will motivate us moving forward, is producing experiences that’s aren’t going upstream into cloud storage, but downstream and simplifying the web, decluttering, and creating more trust between us and the other experiences we have.”

From its outset, WeTransfer has been building goodwill with creatives and constructed its entire experience–from product to branding to marketing–with this audience in mind. It donated 30% of its wallpapers to artists–visual, performing, musical–and picked people to feature based on who its employees liked and were passionate about. (“The goal was to send so much traffic to their site, it would bring their site down,” Bradfield says of the artists they spotlighted.)

The company has steadily, and quietly, been expanding its properties under the leadership of its head of experiences, Nelly Ben Hayoun . There’s a chance you haven’t heard about most of them. (I use WeTransfer’s free service regularly–along with a host of other file sharing services–and didn’t know about most extras until researching this story, a testament to their unobtrusiveness.)

[Image: courtesy WeTransfer]

In 2016, the company formally branded the production arm of the company that creates content for artists as WeTransfer Studios. That same year it formally grouped its editorial as This Works, a blog and online magazine. Last year, it launched a browser extension so that users could be greeted with a WeTransfer-curated image upon opening Chrome.The idea is that by producing good creative work, people who make good creative work themselves will recognize it and continue to turn to WeTransfer for whatever new vertical its creates.

“It’s a [Main] Street-store mentality,” Bradfield says. “The front door is always open. You can come in use our service and leave, and come back. We have the confidence that they will [return].”

The company also has a number of efforts outside of digital products that caters to its audience. It co-sponsors a free architecture school, donates free premium accounts to art students, and offered former SoundCloud employees $10,000 to fuel their creative pursuits instead of immediately jumping into a 9-5 post-layoff.

[Image: courtesy WeTransfer]

Since its launch, WeTransfer hasn’t been building a better file sharing service. That part of the company has remained relatively unchanged. But it’s been building an audience of creatives and keeping them in mind as they expand.In 2015, WeTransfer had about 30 employees; now it’s up to 100. Bradfield says the company is experiencing double-digit revenue growth year on year. Speed of growth–in terms of user numbers–hasn’t been the goal; rather, retaining the audience along the way has. The company plans to keep this approach as it moves forward, always keeping in mind that its experience be centered around simplicity and making it easier for creatives to be creative.

While other file-sharing services, like Dropbox, are rebranding and trying to emulate WeTransfer’s punchy look, at their core they’re still cloud services and are competing with one another. But WeTransfer isn’t just competing against Dropbox and Hightail. It’s competing with NownessDazed, and Dezeen for editorial; Vice for sponsored video production; and even Google (since the company also has an email service). When I ask Bradfield about one of the biggest challenges for growth, he says it’s maintaining credibility.

“We’re broad enough in our user base to move into different avenues, but we couldn’t do that if we didn’t have the creative community,” Bradfield says. “As long as we’re cautious and credible, we have many opportunities. It’s similar to Apple in that Apple isn’t a technology company–it’s a hardware company, a music company, it’s a retailer, it’s a space that the creative audience trusts.”

[“Source-fastcodesign”]

Facebook Launches NFC-Based Two Factor Authentication Process for Added Security

Facebook Launches NFC-Based Two Factor Authentication Process for Added Security

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Facebook has introduced Security Key system in its 2FA process
  • A physical security key can now be added to your account
  • It has also introduced a workaround NFC-login method for its mobile site

Facebook on Thursday announced the introduction of a Security Key system for its two-factor authentication method while logging in to the social media site. In this Security Key 2FA process, Facebook also introduced NFC-based logins for its mobile site – a first of its kind for any social site.

The social networking giant currently offers 2FA via a security code for login approvals from a text message (SMS) or by using the Facebook app to generate the code directly on their phone. Now, Facebook has introduced a new security key system that can transmit data via NFC to help log into the social media site through a physical key. This means that NFC-embedded Android devices can now use NFC-capable keys (like Yubico’s) to log into Facebook’s mobile site. The security key system, even though a great step forward, is still in its nascent beginnings. First up, it won’t work on your app, and is only compatible with the mobile site on the latest version of the Chrome browser. Furthermore, you will also need the latest version of the Google Authenticator installed on your Android device to make this 2FA process work.

ALSO SEEGoogle Adds Physical Security Key Support to 2-Step Verification

Apart from NFC logins, Facebook introduced the traditional security key system as an added option for 2FA. This means that you can register a physical security key to your account so that the next time you log in after enabling login approvals, you’ll simply tap a small hardware device that goes in the USB drive of your computer. This again, has support only for the Web browser. Furthermore, you’ll need to be using the latest version of Chrome or Opera to add the Security Key from your computer.

With all these shortcomings, it is unlikely for this feature to be adopted widely, but it’s still a testimony of the things to come in the future. With the advent of a hardware part being essential for logging in to Facebook, the potential of an exploit becomes negligible.

Tags: Facebook, Facebook Security Key, Facebook 2FA Login, Two Factor Authentication, Apps, Social
[“source-Theguardian”] [“source-seventeen”]
[“Source-Gadgets”]

MF redemption process takes 1-3 days based on type of fund

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I have lost a lot of money in stock trading in the past and so I am sceptical of mutual funds (MFs). How do I invest in MFs but still keep the risk at bay? I have a goal of my 5-year-old daughter’s higher education.

—Prakash Anthony

For a regular investor, MFs offer two advantages over direct stock market investing. One, they offer the facility of having your money managed by a financial expert in investing. Since the historical performances of MFs are transparently available, you can also compare fund managers and look at track records before investing.

Second, MFs offer diversification—the ability to invest in a variety of stocks with a relatively small amount of money. Diversification inherently lowers the risk of market investments since an investor’s money gets spread out among many more stocks compared to what individuals can afford by themselves. But it should be noted that while these two factors lower the risk of investing in the market, they do not eliminate the risk. Investing in equity MFs does carry risk. However, past market performances strongly indicate that the longer you stay invested in good funds, the higher is the likelihood of making handsome gains.

For your daughter’s education goal, which is still 10-12 years away, it will be good to have a portfolio with a good chunk, say, 75%, in equity funds. You can go for equity funds such as Franklin India Blue chip fund and Birla Sun life Frontline Equity fund.

How do you redeem an MF?

—Neha Sehwal

If the investment was made through an application form, for redeeming (withdrawing money from) an MF you would need to submit a redemption form, mentioning the folio number, scheme name and the amount of withdrawal. If it was done online, you would need to login into the platform and submit a digital request. Either way, the money will come to your bank account in 1-3 days depending on the type of fund. Liquid and money market funds are paid out in 1 business day, debt funds in 2 days, and domestic equity funds in 3 days.

I had made an MF investment in 2006 and have since moved cities. The bank account linked to that account is no longer active. I got a call from the MF about a dividend cheque. They have made it payable to my older account. What should I do?

—Raman Sen

You would need to write to the MF company citing the issue, and request them to change the bank account attached to the folio. You would need to provide proof of both the old and the new bank account (cancelled cheque or account statement).

You should also mention about the dividend outstanding. The MF will then process the change of bank request, and reprocess the dividend payout. Usually, it will happen in the form of a direct (electronic) deposit to your new bank account, and in some cases, a cheque will be reissued payable to your new account.

[“Source-Livemint”]