Alibaba Group Expands Presence in Australia, New Zealand

Alibaba Group Expands Presence in Australia, New Zealand

Chinese online retailer Alibaba Group opened its Australian and New Zealand headquarters in Melbourne on Saturday, its first expansion in the region as it seeks to tap growing global demand for products from the two countries.

The group’s billionaire founder Jack Ma, who spent time in Australia as a young man, said he hoped the e-commerce giant would help Australian and New Zealand businesses “share their world-famous products with billions of customers around the world”.

There are more than 1,300 Australian and 400 New Zealand brands on Alibaba’s Tmall and Tmall Global, the company said in a statement.

“Alibaba Group’s vision for the ANZ region is to build the entire operating infrastructure needed to enable local businesses to expand globally,” Maggie Zhou, the group’s Australian and New Zealand Managing Director, said.

Further growth is planned in the areas of cloud computing, payments, digital entertainment and logistics, she said.

Alibaba also signed a memorandum of understanding with Australia Post aimed at streamlining logistics between Australia and China and developing the first Australian marketplace within Alibaba’s Lazada eCommerce Network in Southeast Asia.

Ma met with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in Sydney on Friday where the pair discussed trade, small-and-medium businesses and young business people.

© Thomson Reuters 2017

Tags: Alibaba, Apps, Internet, E Commerce, Jack Ma
[“Source-Gadgets”]

MOZ Local Insights Launches – A Hub for Analyzing Local Marketing Presence

Meet Moz Local Search Insights. The company says the new tool is designed to provide businesses with a comprehensive understanding of their local search presence.

In an email interview with Small Business Trends, Dudley Carr, VP of Engineering at Moz, said, “Moz Local Insights is unique in how it helps a business look at local data. For each piece of data, we distill the data across all of your locations into a single, meaningful number. Moz Local Insights then breaks those numbers down to provide more detail into what’s driving those metrics.”

Delivering these metrics requires understanding locations, and for small businesses looking to get a return on their local search efforts, Moz Local Insights provides business analytics that allows companies to see how they are doing compared to local competitors for relevant search keywords.

By looking at performance data coming from Google Analytics, Google My Business, ranking metrics from Google search and reviews from sites like Yelp that have the potential to show in your search result, Moz Local Insights measures the metrics with the most impact as they relate to your local search marketing efforts.

Carr said, “It is going to give local businesses the most holistic picture of their digital marketing.”

The value of local search is also highlighted by Google in its research paper, “Understanding Consumers’ Local Search Behavior.” It said, “Local searches lead to more purchases than non-local searches. Eighteen percent of local searches on smartphone lead to a purchase within a day verses 7 percent of non-local searches.”

When Moz announced the beta release, Director of Local Search Strategy David Mihm said, this platform is, “The hub for analyzing your location-centric digital activity.” Because it is becoming increasingly more difficult to keep up with the disparate sources where this data appears.

The beta release has features driven by customers. Everyone from agencies to enterprise brands had some input in how to improve the platform, and Moz made great efforts to incorporate those suggestions.

When you access a location or multiple locations in your account, or locations you have tagged with custom labels, you see daily-updated reporting in three key areas: location page performance, SERP rankings and reputation.

Location Page Performance

According to Moz, this section refines the metrics from online traffic that is most important to brick- and-mortar businesses into a single screen. It breaks down the traffic by percentages, sources by device type and a list of local directories sending potential customers to your website.

Mihm said, “While we haven’t yet integrated impression data from these directories, this should give you a relative indicator of customer engagement on each. We’re hoping to add even more performance metrics, including Google My Business and other primary consumer destinations, as they become available.”

Visibility

The Visibility section has the reports of the rankings focused on location. The metrics it provides include performance in local packs and organic results. Just as the scoring system in Moz Analytics, Mihms said they have combined rankings into a single metric for both types of results to reflect the likelihood that a searcher will click on a result for your business when searching a given keyword.

It also lets you compare up to three competitors at a time to see how your business is faring. You can choose any competitor with granular visibility based on analysis by keyword, locations, average local rank, average organic rank and visibility score.

Reputation

The Reputation section shows the progress of your review of acquisition efforts in terms of volume and the ratings that people are leaving for your business. This includes a distribution of where people are leaving reviews. Based on this information, a business can identify the sites that need more attention and take action with better marketing, etc.

This section will have more features to include more review sources, sentiment analysis and notifications and summaries of new reviews.

Even when we decide to patronize a multi-national company with presence in many countries around the world, our decision is based on the quality of the product locally. And for local businesses, the available technology in the market place, such as Moz Local Search Insights, can provide solutions that highlight the value of place in their marketing mix with great results.

Search Insights is enabled for all Moz Local customers by default.

Image: Moz

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

MOZ Local Insights Launches – A Hub for Analyzing Local Marketing Presence

moz local

Meet Moz Local Search Insights. The company says the new tool is designed to provide businesses with a comprehensive understanding of their local search presence.

In an email interview with Small Business Trends, Dudley Carr, VP of Engineering at Moz, said, “Moz Local Insights is unique in how it helps a business look at local data. For each piece of data, we distill the data across all of your locations into a single, meaningful number. Moz Local Insights then breaks those numbers down to provide more detail into what’s driving those metrics.”

Delivering these metrics requires understanding locations, and for small businesses looking to get a return on their local search efforts, Moz Local Insights provides business analytics that allows companies to see how they are doing compared to local competitors for relevant search keywords.

By looking at performance data coming from Google Analytics, Google My Business, ranking metrics from Google search and reviews from sites like Yelp that have the potential to show in your search result, Moz Local Insights measures the metrics with the most impact as they relate to your local search marketing efforts.

Carr said, “It is going to give local businesses the most holistic picture of their digital marketing.”

The value of local search is also highlighted by Google in its research paper, “Understanding Consumers’ Local Search Behavior.” It said, “Local searches lead to more purchases than non-local searches. Eighteen percent of local searches on smartphone lead to a purchase within a day verses 7 percent of non-local searches.”

When Moz announced the beta release, Director of Local Search Strategy David Mihm said, this platform is, “The hub for analyzing your location-centric digital activity.” Because it is becoming increasingly more difficult to keep up with the disparate sources where this data appears.

The beta release has features driven by customers. Everyone from agencies to enterprise brands had some input in how to improve the platform, and Moz made great efforts to incorporate those suggestions.

When you access a location or multiple locations in your account, or locations you have tagged with custom labels, you see daily-updated reporting in three key areas: location page performance, SERP rankings and reputation.

Location Page Performance

According to Moz, this section refines the metrics from online traffic that is most important to brick- and-mortar businesses into a single screen. It breaks down the traffic by percentages, sources by device type and a list of local directories sending potential customers to your website.

Mihm said, “While we haven’t yet integrated impression data from these directories, this should give you a relative indicator of customer engagement on each. We’re hoping to add even more performance metrics, including Google My Business and other primary consumer destinations, as they become available.”

Visibility

The Visibility section has the reports of the rankings focused on location. The metrics it provides include performance in local packs and organic results. Just as the scoring system in Moz Analytics, Mihms said they have combined rankings into a single metric for both types of results to reflect the likelihood that a searcher will click on a result for your business when searching a given keyword.

It also lets you compare up to three competitors at a time to see how your business is faring. You can choose any competitor with granular visibility based on analysis by keyword, locations, average local rank, average organic rank and visibility score.

Reputation

The Reputation section shows the progress of your review of acquisition efforts in terms of volume and the ratings that people are leaving for your business. This includes a distribution of where people are leaving reviews. Based on this information, a business can identify the sites that need more attention and take action with better marketing, etc.

This section will have more features to include more review sources, sentiment analysis and notifications and summaries of new reviews.

Even when we decide to patronize a multi-national company with presence in many countries around the world, our decision is based on the quality of the product locally. And for local businesses, the available technology in the market place, such as Moz Local Search Insights, can provide solutions that highlight the value of place in their marketing mix with great results.

Search Insights is enabled for all Moz Local customers by default.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Residential status in India is based on physical presence

iStockPhoto

iStockPhoto

I have been living in Dubai for the past 15 years and have decided to return to India in November this year. I wanted to know how I will be taxed this year, and would it be better for me from a tax point of view to shift a little later so that my tax deduction in India starts in the next financial year (FY) 2017-18?

—Kamlesh Sharma

It is likely that your status in FY17 will be of a non-resident assuming your total physical presence in India in the year is less than 182 days. As a non-resident, you will be liable to tax in India only on income arising, earned and received in India.

Income earned and received outside India and subsequently remitted into India is not liable to tax in India in case of a non-resident.

Examples of incomes arising or earned in India include income earned from employment exercised in India, any business or profession here, sale of assets in the country, interest from bank accounts in India, among others.

Your residential status in India is determined based on your total physical presence in India in the current FY and preceding 10 FYs since taxability in India differs on the basis of residential status in India. If the individual satisfies any of the basic conditions mentioned below, the individual would qualify as a resident; otherwise she would qualify as a non-resident:

Basic conditions:

*Stay in India during the FY is 182 days or more, or stay in India during the FY is 60 days or more and is in India 365 days or more in the preceding four FYs.

A resident may either qualify as an ‘ordinarily resident’ or ‘not ordinarily resident’.

If both the additional conditions mentioned below are met, then the individual would qualify as an ordinarily resident; if not, such a person would qualify as a ‘not ordinarily resident’.

Additional conditions:

*Resident in India in 9 of 10 FYs preceding the relevant FY, and

*Stay in the 7 years preceding the relevant FY adds up to 729 days or more.

An ordinarily resident can be taxed on her worldwide income and is required to report assets held in India and outside India in the Indian tax return.

However, a ‘not ordinarily resident’ and a non-resident can be taxed in India only on income received in India or deemed to be received in India, and income accruing or arising in India or deemed to accrue or arise in India.

[“Source-Livemint”]