HMD Global sends out invite for Nokia 8 launch on August 16

Nokia 8, Nokia 8 launch date, Nokia 8 specifications, Nokia 8 leaks, Nokia 8 launch August 16, HMD Global, HMD Global Nokia 8, Nokia 8 price in India

 

Nokia 8 launch date confirmed: The invites have started going from HMD Global, and the event takes place on August 16.

Nokia 8 will launch on August 16, and HMD Global has started sending out invites for the same. The Verge reported about the upcoming launch event. Nokia 8 was recently spotted on the China website of the firm, before the image was taken down. We’ve seen quite a few leaked images of the Nokia 8 thanks to HMD Global’s leaked image, and of course, Evan Blass, better known as @Evleaks on Twitter.

According to the report on The Verge, Nokia 8 launch will take place at an event in London, and this smartphone will likely come with Carl Zeiss Optics on the camera lens. HMD Global had itself confirmed it will be working with Zeiss for the camera optics. In terms of specifications, Nokia 8 will likely be the flagship device from HMD Global.

Recently a Nokia 8 in copper gold colour was leaked online, but the company is expected to launch this phone in silver and blue models as well. Nokia 8 will come with a 5.3-inch Quad HD screen, coupled with the Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor. Based on leaked images, the display will have a 2.5D glass on top, capacitive buttons, a fingerprint scanner in the home button. So, this won’t be a bezel-less device without a home button, just yet.

The key highlight of the Nokia 8 is expected to be the dual cameras stacked. Leaked images indicate these will be stacked vertically, and HMD Global could go for a dual 13MP+13MP camera set up. The rear camera setup will also have a laser autofocus sensor, dual-tone LED flash along with the Carl Zeiss branding.

Nokia 6, Nokia 5, Nokia 3 First Look: HMD Global’s New Nokia Phones

Other specifications of the Nokia 8, according to the rumours are 4GB RAM, 64GB storage and dual-SIM slots, along with Android 7.1 Nougat. A report by WinFuture claimed Nokia 8 will be priced at €589 or approximately Rs 43,000 plus in Scandinavian countries.

HMD Global is getting ready to launch its new flagship phone, but its first set of global offerings like Nokia 5 and Nokia 6 are yet to go on sale in India. Nokia 3 and Nokia 3310 are already available for purchase in the market, but the mid-range offerings will only go on sale in August.

[“Source-indianexpress”]

Spotify Signs Sony Royalty Deal While Warner Holds Out: Reports

Spotify Signs Sony Royalty Deal While Warner Holds Out: Reports

Spotify has reached a licensing deal with a second major label, Sony Music Entertainment, according to media reports, setting the stage for a US stock market listing by the music streaming leader.

Recently valued at $13 billion (roughly Rs. 83,810 crores), Sweden’s Spotify is planning a direct listing on the New York Stock Exchange later this year or in early 2018, sources told Reuters in May.

Sony agreed to reduce royalties that Spotify must pay in return for the streaming service restricting new albums to paying subscribers for two weeks before offering access to free users, the Financial Times reported, citing a single source.

Sony’s top artists include Adele, Beyonce and Shakira.

Spotify is also in talks with Warner Music Group , Billboard reported.

Favourable royalty terms are crucial for Spotify to attain profitability and to make it a viable long-term holding for investors.

The company reported a EUR 349 million ($400 million) operating loss, a 47 percent increase on a year earlier, even as revenue grew 50 percent to EUR 2.93 billion.

In April, it signed a multi-year licensing deal with Vivendi’s Universal Music Group, with a similar two-week release window for new albums and a break on the royalties Spotify pays Universal.

It also signed up digital agency Merlin, on behalf of more than 20,000 independent labels.

Last year, Universal held a 28.9 percent share of global music label revenue, Sony Music generated 22.4 percent and Warner 17.4 percent. Independent labels made up the remaining 31.3 percent, MIDiA Research data showed.

Spotify has fended off competition from rival Apple Music, with nearly double the number of paying subscribers.

In March, Spotify said it had more than 50 million paying subscribers and 140 million active users, including free listeners. Apple reported 27 million music subscribers last month, up from 20 million in December.

The company has faced boycotts from some top music artists who have complained its free services undercut the value of their work but the major label licensing deals have gone some way toward easing these tensions, according to analysts.

Spotify declined to comment. Sony Music Entertainment and Warner Music Group did not respond to requests for immediate comment.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Google confirms it’s rolling out new reviews format for hotels

Google has confirmed with Search Engine Land that it is now rolling out a new user interface and feature set around local reviews for hotels. Earlier this month, we saw Google begin testing new hotel reviews features, and now Google has begun to roll them out. Sergey Alakov was the first to notice these beginning to roll out.

A Google spokesperson confirmed this with us just now and said in a statement:

Google is continually improving the information shown to people to help them make decisions about where to go. When people are searching for a hotel to stay at, we want to ensure we make it easy for people to find useful and relevant web reviews about that place to help them make informed decisions.

The new hotel reviews interface added some core features. Here are a few:

  • Third-party reviews show in a carousel for some of the listings.
  • The review overview section has a more robust interface showing stronger colors and reviews also by attribute.
  • The detailed review section will show a graphical user interface based on type of travel.

Here are some screen shots we are able to see now of the new interface:

[“Source-ndtv”]

Microsoft’s Latest Workplace Tech Demos Creep Me Out

Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo

If you’re an employee under the heel of a giant corporation you should probably be terrified by the vision of the future of connected gadgets that Microsoft just revealed at its Build developer conference here in Seattle.

Two demos from today’s keynote stood out, both for being entertaining and for revealing a potentially frightening future for anyone working for a big employer with the will to micro-monitor its employees.

The first featured cameras watching employees on a construction worksite. The cameras are tied into the cloud, where artificial intelligence monitors everything in real time, noting identities of employees as well as identifying almost every single piece of equipment on the worksite.

That is undoubtedly cool, especially as the AI can instantly notice when someone is on the worksite that shouldn’t be, or identify when someone is using dangerous equipment in an ill-advised fashion.

It is also, you know, terrifying. Microsoft’s demo purposely focused on a construction worksite, where accidents are too common, and a smart AI overseer sort of makes sense. Spotting OSHA violations or trespassers quickly and then relaying that information to an employer via mobile notifications could genuinely save limbs and lives.

But my brain immediately started conjuring a scenario that was much more oppressive—One where these cameras were in some open office where people come to work in skirts or button downs from Dillard’s. Not a place where security or safety is a primary concern, but instead, a place where employers obsessively monitor employees in some misguided attempt to maximize profit by chewing up and spitting out the fleshy cogs in their machine.

With a surveillance system like this you couldn’t invite your friend to stop by for lunch because your boss would know, a notification instantly appearing on their phone. There’d be no long lunches or grabbing extra office supplies from the closet. Take a too smoke breaks or have a bout of indigestion that leaves you on the toilet longer than usual? The AI would be able to notice so quickly that your boss could meet you in the hallway with a bottle of Pepto Bismol.

In this screenshot an employer is getting a notification because this guy hasn’t set a jackhammer down correctly. (Image: Screenshot)

The little bit of autonomy many employees still have in the office would be eradicated if this system were moved away from construction worksites and into more traditional offices.

This further illustrated by the other big demo of Build’s Day 1 Keynote. It focused on Cortana, and how it could now be everywhere, instead of just lashed to your laptop or phone. The demo shows a woman chatting with a Cortana-powered Invoke speaker in a set intended to represent her home. Then it reminded her she had a meeting, so she hopped in the car, where it promptly told her traffic was going to make her late and notified her workplace, then slotted her into a meeting already in progress.

Image: Screenshot

This sounds wildly cool and convenient, but there was one thing Microsoft left unsaid. This woman was logged into her home and car with her workplace ID, which means potentially her employers could now have access to data from her home and car life. If work-life balance is of any concern to you, the fact that your home speaker system might one day tell you to hurry up and get to the office because you’re late and you’re chronically late should be alarming.

These demos illustrate the trade-offs inherent in a world in which we use more and more connected gadgets. You have to give up some of your privacy in order to reap the benefits of a network of devices tuned to you and your whims. But the realities of these trade-offs start to feel worse with Microsoft because despite its array of consumer products, like the Surface Pro and Microsoft 10 Home, Microsoft is in the business of working with businesses. Those are its primary clients, and it’s very much who Microsoft spent the majority of today’s keynote speaking to. You are not the business model, your company is. Asking consumers to give their data to a big faceless corporation like Google so it can sell ads is one thing—but asking them to also give all that data to the people who sign their checks is another.

[“source-gizmodo”]