Microsoft HoloLens Is Headed to 29 New Markets

Microsoft HoloLens Is Headed to 29 New Markets

As demand for mixed reality grows in the modern workplace, Microsoft has announced that it has brought its mixed reality smart-glass HoloLens to 29 new European markets.

At the Future Decoded event in London on Wednesday, Microsoft outlined its vision for mixed reality in front of over 15,000 IT and business decision makers who came to talk about current and emerging trends happening at the intersection of business and technology.

“We shared how technologies like Microsoft 365, Microsoft HoloLens, Windows Mixed Reality, and 3D are helping companies, Firstline Workers, and Information Workers become agents of change in the modern workplace and digital transformation,” said Lorraine Bardeen, General Manager, Microsoft HoloLens and Windows Experiences, in a blogpost.

She said that mixed reality empowers people and organisations to achieve more and the experiences would help businesses and their employees complete crucial tasks faster, safer, more efficiently, and create new ways to connect to customers and partners.

“The era of mixed reality will serve as a catalyst for innovations in the workplace and we expect ‘Firstline Workers’ and ‘Information Workers’ to benefit significantly from solutions that blend our physical and digital reality,” she said.

With mixed reality, workers can change the content, the people, or even the location of a meeting, in a matter of seconds.

Mixed reality delivers interfaces that help workers act upon data generated from instrumented/intelligence devices, and connect seamlessly with others across physical space.

To make innovation easy and address growing demand for mixed reality solutions around the world, Microsoft said HoloLens is now coming to 29 new European markets, bringing the total number of HoloLens markets to 39.

“We are also working to bring some of the most-asked-for software updates for HoloLens to our existing customers. We are committed to delivering an update to existing customers sometime early next year,” she said.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Money likely to move from India markets to China: Marc Faber

Money likely to move from India markets to China: Marc Faber

Equity markets across the world have performed very well as most markets in Asia have given a return of 20 to 25 percent in dollar terms. India is up 30 percent in dollar terms.

“I am positive on emerging markets for about a year relative to the US,” Marc Faber, the editor and publisher of The Gloom, Boom & Doom Report, said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

“If I look back, after 2014, emerging markets grossly underperformed the S&P 500. If we look at major markets in Asia, India rose 30% in USD and Chin hasn’t gone up that much which bring me to conclude that some money will move from India to Chinese markets,” he said.

Why will the money move from Indian markets to China? “Sentiments around China were very negative in the past six months to a year but that is now turning positive,” added Faber.

Commenting on the dollar, Faber said that the U.S. dollar could “easily rebound” by 4 to 5 percent from current levels, but President Donald Trump and his administration stand in the way of the currency’s long-term strength.

The greenback has had a tough year, with the dollar index tumbling nearly 10 percent since the start of 2017. At the same time, gains among currencies such as euro and peso also added to the dollar’s pain, said a CNBC report.

Commenting on Gold, Faber said it is an under-appreciated asset. Data suggest that from December lows in 2015, the GDX, the Gold ETF is up more than 100% and this year the GDX is up more than 25 percent.

If we compare the performance of the S&P, it is a fabulous performance and some gold shares have even done very well, he said.

[“Source-moneycontrol”]

US markets lower after tech reversal from record highs

Businessman sleeping with bear with down trend graph

US markets closed lower on Thursday after technology sector rolled over.

The Nasdaq composite closed 0.6% lower at 2,475.42 and fell more than 1% earlier in the session. The S&P 500 also closed lower at 6,382.19, slipping 0.1% as tech stocks dropped 0.8 % to lead decliners.

The tech sector had notched an intraday record earlier in the session, along with the Nasdaq and the S&P.

Tech faced pressure as investors took profits off the table following strong earnings from companies in the space.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average, outperformed, closing 85.54 points higher at 21,796.55 level and notching intraday and closing records.

Meanwhile, initial jobless claims came in at 244,000, slightly above the expected 240,000. Durable goods orders, meanwhile, rose 6.5% in June.

Disclaimer: The contents herein is specifically prepared by ‘Dalal Street Investment Journal’, and is for your information & personal consumption only. India Infoline Limited or Dalal Street Investment Journal do not guarantee the accuracy, correctness, completeness or reliability of information contained herein and shall not be held responsible.

[“Source-indiainfoline”]

Fingerprint Firms Unlocking New Markets Beyond Smartphones

Fingerprint Firms Unlocking New Markets Beyond Smartphones

A tap of a finger could soon suffice to identify credit card shoppers and rail commuters, offering areas of new business for specialist companies which have benefited from the use of such technology in smartphones.Sweden’s Fingerprint Cards (FPC) sees biometric smart cards those using fingerprint identification becoming its fastest growing market as early as 2018, having already become the market leader in a crowded sector for supplying such sensors for smartphones.

Others within the industry are not convinced the smart card business will take off so quickly, prompting questions about whether FPC can maintain its runaway rise in valuation.

FPC’s share price surged around 1,600 percent last year as demand for fingerprint sensors in phones soared after Apple, which uses its own in-house supplier, helped to popularise the technology. FPC now has a market value of around $4.1 billion (roughly Rs. 27,302 crores).

Advocates say the technology offers greater security and simplicity when compared to techniques such as using pin codes to confirm identification.

The fingerprint sensor business has a handful of companies supplying significant volumes today, with an equal number planning to enter the market. Three are based in the Nordic region where technology companies have thrived.Needing to maintain its momentum, FPC says it is in initial talks with potential big customers for smart cards. It declines to name names at this stage.

“Our ambition for smart cards, and all other segments, is that we shall continue to be number one,” FPC’s Chief Executive Jorgen Lantto told Reuters.

Silicon Valley firm Synaptics, the closest rival to FPC in sensors for smartphones, is more cautious on new markets.

“It’s hard for me to project market share in a segment of the market (when) we’re not sure when it’s going to happen,” said Anthony Gioeli, vice president of marketing in the biometrics division of Synaptics.

Sascha Behlendorf, a card systems product manager at Germany’s Giesecke & Devrient, one of the top three smart card makers, expects widespread adoption of biometrics in smart cards could take some five to 10 years.

Range of uses
Gothenburg-based FPC has been around for almost two decades, building a technology business based on an old Swedish fingerprinting patent. That left it well placed when the market expanded and it has also benefited by hiring staff from Nokia and Ericsson as their mobile phone businesses declined.

Analysts say expectations for new markets have helped to underpin the huge leap in valuation for FPC.

However, Carnegie analyst Havard Nilsson this week cut his recommendation for FPC to “sell” from “hold”, citing what he called unwarranted share price appreciation and repeated his target price of 450 crowns. The shares traded at 524 crowns on Thursday.

“Given that smartphones should constitute 60-70 percent of the global addressable market (in 2020), we do not believe new verticals, such as smart cards, will be able to compensate for competitive pressure in consumer electronics,” Nilsson wrote.

He sees earnings per share peaking at 37 crowns in 2018.

Beyond payments, biometric smart cards could be used to allow access to buildings and IT-systems, according to FPC. Keyless entry to cars is another potential major market, as are wearable products such as watches or wristbands serving as a substitute identity card. FPC includes such applications in its forecasts for “other segments” of business.

FPC sees a total addressable market for this part of its business of roughly 100 million sensors in 2017 and around 500 million in 2018. It is the only player so far to make specific forecasts for these new markets.

“We talk to a lot of players and companies come to us. There is substance behind our numbers,” Lantto said, adding that FPC has held talks with a handful of big potential smart card clients since last autumn.

Most suppliers of fingerprint sensors, including FPC, use 3D imaging technology for recognition of a fingerprint, while Next Biometrics in Norway uses heat sensing technology.

IDEX, another Norwegian competitor, roughly shares FPC’s forecasts for segments beyond smartphones for the coming few years, Chief Financial Officer Henrik Knudtzon said.

IDEX, which last summer entered a partnership with an unnamed global payments company for biometric applications, is integrating its sensors into smart cards with partners and expects shipments to start towards the end of this year, Knudtzon said.

© Thomson Reuters 2016

Tags: Fingerprint Cards, Internet, Mobiles, Tablets, Biometrics, Fingerprint sensors
[“Source-Gadgets”]