Coolpad may launch Cool Play 6 with 6GB of RAM in India on August 20

Coolpad may launch Cool Play 6 with 6GB of RAM in India on August 20

Coolpad is all set to unveil the Cool Play 6 in India on August 20. The smartphone was launched in China back in May for a price of 1,499 Yuan which roughly translates to around Rs 15,000. The smartphone was heavily marketed as a gaming smartphone in China and was launched in two color options – namely Soft Gold and Black.

Coolpad has been teasing the launch of the Play 6 on its Facebook page with the tagline “Livetoplay” and posts such as “6 is not just a number anymore! It is a new era and new benchmark. Monster is all set for 20th Aug. The thrilling power, the invincible. Stay tuned to know more. #LiveToPlay”.

The Play 6 is set to compete with the likes of the Moto G5 Plus and Xiaomi Redmi Note 4. It comes with a metal unibody design, a dual camera setup at the rear, the latest version of Android and fairly high end hardware for the price.

The Play 6 is powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 653 processor paired with 6GB of RAM and a 4,060mAh battery that the company claims can deliver 252 hours of standby time, 9 hours of internet browsing, 8 hours of video watching and 6 hours of gaming.

Additionally, the Play 6 comes with a 5.5-inch Full HD display with a resolution of 1080 x1920, 64GB of internal storage expandable via a miscroSD card, a rear mounted fingerprint scanner and a USB Type C port for charging and data transfer. It supports 4G LTE, dualSIMs, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and GPS.

On the imaging front, the Cool Play 6 comes with a dual camera setup at the rear – a primary 13MP RGB (color) sensor paired with a secondary 13MP monochrome (black and white) sensor with a dual-LED flash. Both sensors have an aperture of f/2.0. The secondary sensor allows for the capture of images with depth of field information. On the front, there is an 8MP sensor with an aperture of f/2.2 for selfies.

[“Source-indiatoday”]

Cash Is Culture in India, but It’s Not Going to Be the Future

Cash Is Culture in India, but It’s Not Going to Be the Future

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Cash is not just the norm but also embedded in culture
  • New systems like mPOS terminals are making digital more convenient
  • Apps like BHIM help bring payments from India to Bharat as a whole

In India, cash is culture. It’s everywhere, inspiring Hindi film songs, being doled out by loving grandparents, occupying a key role in religious rituals, and even fuelling a parallel economy. So resistance to any alternative method of payment is only to be expected.

This is amply evident from the way digital transactions, which had spiked from 672 million in November 2016 to 958 million in December 2016 because of demonetisation, plummeted to 763 million (February 2017) once the new currency came back in circulation, as per RBI data. The latest numbers show some growth, but it’s a far cry from the peak in December even now.

It’s a challenge that Digital India is up for. Driving the shift from cash to digital payments are a host of factors – a huge population of young, aspiring people embracing the digital lifestyle, the “India Stack” of four technology layers (presenceless, paperless, cashless, consent), and a robust real-time payments infrastructure in which the Unified Payments Interface (UPI) is the crown jewel. But beyond doubt, policies such as banning the use of cash for transactions amounting to Rs. 200,000 or more are also making an impact. In his budget speech this year, the Minister of Finance announced a mission tasked with achieving 25 billion digital transactions in the year 2017-18 through various means including Aadhaar Pay, UPI, USSD, IMPS, and debit cards.

payment systems

That’s a tall order for an economy where 98 percent of consumer payments are still made in cash. Before this can happen though, several barriers lie in the way. The “cash habit” is at the top of the list, followed by the complexity of using digital payment methods.

Cash is easy
The second factor is telling. A huge reason why cash still rules as a medium of exchange is that it is simple and convenient. Digital payment mechanisms, which might be convenient in some ways – (they save a trip to the bank and are easy to carry around) – are actually less convenient at the point of use. To understand this, visualise the process of using a mobile wallet – log in, authenticate yourself, scan code, enter amount, authorise payment – and now compare it to the ease of handing out cash.

Currently, there is friction on both sides of the digital payment transaction. The abundance of payment options with their different POS hardware and procedures is confusing merchants, who don’t know where to draw the line. This isn’t making life simpler for consumers either.

Clearly, digital payments must become frictionless before they can find mass acceptance.

mpos machine eze

Technology and innovation can do much to facilitate that. For instance, Ezetap has introduced a mobile-based payments acceptance device that merchants can use for all types of digital payments. Another good example is Tonetag, one of our partner firms, which has found an alternative solution to NFC technology with a communication mechanism that uses sound waves. Merchants can even accept cards in much the same way as before; customers need to authorise the payment like they do with NFC, with a swipe, password or OTP.

Ezetap, Tonetag, and others like them reduce the friction in payments, but they don’t eliminate it altogether. Some other forces need to come together to make digital payments as convenient as cash.

Bharat, and not just India
One of these is the digitisation of low-income consumers, which received a shot in the arm when the BHIM app was launched a couple of months after demonetisation with the goal of enabling those with a bank account but no cards, to make digital payments. Another factor is the growth of e-commerce players, who, by accepting card or wallet payments on delivery, have eased even reluctant cash customers into digital payments. The next level of e-commerce, namely smart commerce, will drive digital payments even higher, using AI and analytics to spur consumption.

bhim full

To see what that looks like, you need only look to Amazon, which has mastered the use of consumer analytics to anticipate needs, personalise recommendations, or simply remind customers of something they had shown interest in.

These forces are still brewing at present. When they take firm hold, India will make more meaningful progress towards digital payments. While the timeline for that is uncertain, once the conditions fall into place, the shift from cash to digital will be swift and irreversible.

Venkatramana Gosavi is Senior Vice President and Regional Head, Infosys Finacle, and has been working with Finacle for over 15 years now.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

New Hyundai Verna 2017 Brochure Leaked Ahead of India Launch

We previously reported that Hyundai Verna 2017 interior details have been leaked online as the sedan is slated to launch in the Indian car market on August 22. The dealers across the country have initiated the pre-bookings for the new generation Verna with upfront payment of INR 25,000 as token amount. The South Korean automaker has started dispatching the third generation Verna sedan to the dealerships which has been spotted at the dealership stockyard. Moreover, the official brochure of the next generation Verna sedan has been leaked online confirming the specifications, safety details and other important features. The all-new Verna will sport futuristic design which comes with sleek lines and coupe like styling that gives a charismatic presence on the road. Offered with a choice of petrol and diesel, the new Hyundai Verna will be available in 12 variants. Also Read: 2017 Hyundai Verna Interior Leaked Ahead of India Launch; Likely to be Priced up to INR 14 Lakh

On the exterior front, the new generation Verna comes with Hyundai’s new Design language which complements the cascading chrome front grille, projector headlamp with LED DRLs, chrome finished fog lamps, turn indicator with ORVMs, Chrome beltine, 16-inch alloy wheels, shark fin antenna, LED tail light and much more. Dimension wise, the all-new Verna will come with length of 4440mm, width of 1729mm and height of 1475mm along with wheelbase of 2600mm. See More: Hyundai Verna 2017 Price in India Likely to Start From INR 8 Lakh; India Launch, Interior, Images – Everything to Know

On the inside, the new Verna will sport leather upholstery which gives an up market feel to the cabin. The sedan will come with 5-inch touch screen infotainment system for the mid variant while the top end variants will sport 7-inch touchscreen system with Voice recognition, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and MirrorLink. In terms of features, the new Hyundai Verna will be equipped with technology and advanced feature which includes cruise control, sunroof, center arm rest at front and rear, USB chargers at front and rear, ventilated front seats, rear curtain and rear air-conditioning vents. Safety wise, the all-new Verna will be equipped with dual airbags, ABS, reverse parking sensors and much more. See More: New Hyundai Verna 2017 continuous testing ahead of its India launch

Under the hood, the third generation Verna will be powered by a powerful and efficient petrol and diesel engines which are aerodynamically designed for stability and excellent ride quality. The petrol unit will be powered by a 1.6-litre Gamma dual VTVT petrol mill which can develop 123PS @ 6400 rpm with peak torque of 155Nm. On the other hand, the 1.6-litre U2 CRDi diesel engine can produce max power of 128 PS @ 4000 rpm with max torque of 260Nm. Also See: 2017 Hyundai Verna to Get All New Advanced Features – Top 5 Least Known Facts

Transmission duties will be taken care by 6-speed manual gearbox along with 6-speed AT gearbox. Expected to be priced in the price bracket of INR 8 – 14 lakh (ex-showroom), the new Verna will be pitted against the segment leader Maruti Suzuki Ciaz, Honda City and others.

[“Source-india”]

Facebook Lite for Android Review: Made for India

Facebook Lite for Android Review: Made for India

While phone makers are now launching 4G handsets and companies like Airtel and Reliance working towards bringing the networks in India, you might think that there’s no need for apps that minimise data use. The fact of the matter though is that even in a metro like Delhi, 3G access depends greatly on which part of the city you’re in at the time.

That’s where Facebook Lite for Android comes into the picture. The app was launched in Asia earlier this month, and on Monday, Facebook Lite became available in India.

Facebook Lite is available on Google Play and it is just 435KB in size, runs on Android 2.2 and above, so even if you’re using an older phone, you can probably take advantage of the application. According to Shankar, Facebook Lite was designed to solve two challenges – 2G Internet and low-end smartphones – and based on our experience with the app, it seems to have accomplished those goals.

What is Facebook Lite?
As the name suggests, Facebook Lite is a light version of Facebook. It looks like an old version of the Facebook app, with blocky looks and limited features. The full-fledged Facebook app has large cards with neat gutters, expands all pictures and fills up your screen, supports gestures to move between the different Facebook functions.

Facebook Lite on the other hand shows all these previews at a much smaller size, and when we were using it on a 2G network, images took forever to show up. The difference between how posts are displayed between the two versions of Facebook is dramatic, and it’s definitely much more appealing to use Facebook on the full application.

facebook_lite_example.jpg

One other thing we noticed as soon as we started the application is that the Facebook logo is absolutely tiny, and this continued as we used the app too – images attached to posts are tiny thumbnails, filling the width of the screen, and they load after you tap on them. On the full Facebook application, images are much bigger, and they’re likely being preloaded, because they popped up in full size as soon as we tapped on the thumbs. The catch is that you’re pre-loading a lot of images you might not want to click on, using a lot of your mobile data along the way.

facebook_example.jpg

Shankar also points out that in the Facebook Lite settings, you can also choose the image quality, between low, medium and high. Facebook uses proprietary compression algorithms to deliver the images at the desired size, without losing too much visible quality.

Overall, the experience of using Facebook Lite is a lot less refined than the full version, but you’re able to see posts and links more quickly while on the road, and you’re using less mobile data to do so as well. All the features you’d expect – the news feed, friend requests, messages, notifications, and search, all show up. You can easily post status updates, or photos, just like you can on the full application. Messenger is built right into Facebook Lite, so you don’t need to have Facebook Messenger installed to chat anymore.

How well did it perform on 2G?
While it’s less refined, Facebook Lite loaded up posts much more quickly than the full version of the app when we switched to Edge connectivity. Usually, when we’re on the road in remote areas, we give up on Facebook because it’s almost certainly not going to load more posts.

The experience with Facebook Lite was a lot closer to using that other social network – Twitter. There are still problems, and posts still take some time to load. Images don’t pop up right away, and take even more time to load. But it does show you new posts and you can at least read what people are saying while you wait for a picture to load, which is a step forward.

Doing all this required some sacrifices. For one thing, the app does not support videos yet, though that is on the roadmap, according to Shankar. It also doesn’t support advanced location features – basically anything that requires the GPS. And while you can post comments on updates and pictures, you can’t reply to comments for now. And while the main Facebook app allows you to work offline, and make post updates when it connects to a network, Facebook Lite does not have this feature.

facebook_lite_settings.jpg

Who should use this?
If you’re using an older Android phone, or if you bought a budget Android device, then the amount of storage available will can often be quite limited.

In such a case, the small size of Facebook Lite might actually be a big plus point, and you might be willing to sacrifice a little bit of the polish of Facebook, but an app that actually works smoothly and loads quickly on your phone which also frees up a lot of space. While Facebook Lite takes less than 1MB, Facebook can be a lot bigger – a few random checks all turned up usage of over 150MB. Smaller footprint also means that app updates take less data.

But the most important thing was that Facebook Lite uses less data. Facebook says that the app gives a reliable experience, even when bandwidth is at a minimum.

That means that if you’ve already started using an LTE connection on your flagship Android phone with a quad-HD screen, then you should will probably find this app boring and pointless. If you spend most of your time at home or in office, with a steady Wi-Fi connection, then you can probably give this app a miss.

On the other hand, if you’re on the move a lot and travel in areas where getting a 3G signal is still a rare thing, or if you’re trying to reduce the data usage you see for Facebook, then this app will be appealing.

On a smaller, lower resolution screen, the difference between the two versions of Facebook wasn’t so pronounced, so you might prefer it if you have an older device, or if you bought a budget phone. And as we mentioned, it will probably be a good idea if you’re using a phone with limited storage space as well.

The app isn’t for everybody, but frankly, the number of people with good connectivity and high-end devices is definitely smaller than people with spotty Internet access and entry-level devices. Based on that, launching Facebook Lite seems like a great move, and will likely find plenty of takers in India.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]