TRAI to Improve MySpeed App, Publish White Paper by Month-End

TRAI to Improve MySpeed App, Publish White Paper by Month-End

HIGHLIGHTS

  • TRAI will improve its MySpeed app after evaluating telcos’ methods
  • It said will soon come out with a white paper on underlying methodology
  • Ookla and other data speed measurement firms have been contacted

Telecom regulator TRAI plans to strengthen its MySpeed app, which measures mobile data speeds, and will also make its evaluation method more transparent after consultation with operators, its chairman R S Sharma said.

Some operators had complained about methods and results of the TRAI’s MySpeed app, and the regulator will soon come out with a white paper on underlying methodology and algorithms used by the said app for calculating data speeds of various service providers.

“We have also contacted Ookla and others. We are trying to understand what their methods are … We would like all stakeholders to sit together and come to a conclusion over most appropriate methodology,” the TRAI chairman said.

The regulator will also take suggestions from operators on the issue, he said.

“We will sit together with the operators and take their suggestions as what should be an agreed methodology so there are no such complaints,” Sharma said on the sidelines of the TRAI’s open house discussion on ‘data speed under wireless broadband plans’.

After strengthening the service quality norms for voice calls, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) is now focusing its attention on benchmarks for data experience of consumers.

TRAI hopes to finalise, by month-end, views on parameters for measuring data speeds for wireless broadband.

“There were large number of quality of service (norms) for voice (offerings) like call drops. Data has recently started becoming prominent, and voice is now an application on top of data. So there is a need to have much better grip on the QoS in the data world,” he added.

Sharma said that both TRAI’s views on the data speed issue and its white paper on MySpeed app will be out by the month-end.

“Work on both the aspects will happen simultaneously,” he said.

While operators had previously stated that having a minimum guaranteed data speed would be difficult in the wireless world, TRAI is looking at suitable parameters, say average speed, that could serve as a benchmark.

In its consultation paper on wireless broadband data speeds, TRAI has also sought industry’s views on whether information on wireless broadband speeds currently being disclosed is enough for consumers to make informed choices.

It has asked if average speed can be specified by service providers. The consultation also touches on other related issues such as the need to revisit service quality parameters or existing benchmarks stipulated in the regulations.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

IB diploma results improve this year, Mumbai topper scores full points

Mumbai city news

Mumbai students did well in the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) exams, which are equivalent to the Class 12 board exams, held in May. The results were declared on Wednesday.

Rahil Bathwal from Jamnabai Narsee International School, Juhu, bagged the perfect score — 45 out of 45 points — the highest in the city. The IBDP results are given in the form of grade points. Pranav Khemka came second with 43 points. Of 103 students, 12 scored above 40 and 32 scored between 35 and 39.

The overall performance in Mumbai schools was much better than last year’s, said principals. At Podar International School in Khar, Ritik Chopra was the topper with 44 points. Last year, their top student scored 43 points. “This year’s results are one of the best in the history of our institution,” said Vandana Lulla, director and principal of the school.

Of 52 exam takers, a majority of the students scored above 40 points, and bagged six and seven points in individual subjects. “We had opted for new subjects such as environmental studies and Spanish, which help drive up scores,” said Lulla.

Similarly, the highest in SVKM’s JV Parekh International School, Vile Parle, this year is 40 points with 65% out of 37 students from the school receiving 33 points. Around 39% of entries scored 6 and 7 grade points.

School principal, Swaminathan said 60% students from the batch received admissions to top universities in Toronto, British Columbia, California, Edinburgh, Illinois Urbana Champagne and King’s College London.

 

[“source-hindustantimes”]

Android O will Improve SMS Authentication for Apps

Image result for Android O will Improve SMS Authentication for Apps

ach new version of Android brings some major changes to the platform, but there are also a ton of minor changes that aren’t nearly as publicized. One such change coming to Android O is an improvement in the way SMS authentication is done by applications. Android O introduces a dedicated API that applications can use to retrieve verification codes sent through SMS, so applications will no longer have to request the SMS permission.


SMS Authentication in Android O

In order to appreciate this subtle change, let’s recap how applications use SMS for authentication prior to Android O. Certain applications (primarily messaging ones) ask you to verify your phone number by entering a verification code. You can either enter this time-sensitive code manually or grant the application the permission to read your SMS messages so it can automatically find and enter the code for you.

Granting an app READ_SMS permission

The problem with this solution is two-fold. For starters, many applications never really need to read your SMS messages outside of this context, so it seems unnecessary to grant them permission to read your entire SMS history. Second, these one-time SMS verification codes add needless clutter to your messaging inbox.

By introducing an API, Android O will solve both of these issues. Applications can now indicate to the system that they are expecting to receive an SMS verification code shortly. They do this by creating a PendingIntent of the type createAppSpecificSmsToken:

Create a single use app specific incoming SMS request for the the calling package. This method returns a token that if included in a subsequent incoming SMS message will cause intent to be sent with the SMS data. The token is only good for one use, after an SMS has been received containing the token all subsequent SMS messages with the token will be routed as normal. An app can only have one request at a time, if the app already has a request pending it will be replaced with a new request.

When the PendingIntent is created, Android will start looking at any incoming SMS for a particular 11 character long token. When the SMS containing the token is received, this method sends the token directly to the application without the application ever reading an SMS. The SMS that contains the token is never sent into the inbox while this PendingIntent is active. Only once Android has sent the Intent to the requesting app will subsequent SMS messages be routed back into the user’s inbox.

Although this is a minor quality-of-life change that will mostly only be appreciated by developers (one less permission = one less headache in potential reviews), it’s great to see Google continue to add features such as this.

[“Source-xda-developers”]

Improve Your Marketing Communications With Insights From Neuromarketing

Would you like to significantly improve the effectiveness of your marketing communications? Of course, you would… We all would.

If you were to read Neuromarketing by Patrick Renvoisé and Christophe Morin, you would better understand how to get prospects to respond to your marketing efforts.

This article is the first of two intended to summarize some key arguments of—and encourage you to read—their book to better understand the how and why of effective marketing communication. That’s because it can help you better understand how the brain functions—what it responds to and understands.

Neuromarketing also substantiates the business process for positioning that I’ve been advocating for more than 20 years: Use simple language, make a unique claim that solves a real business problem, and repeat your position over and over to claim it.

The Three Parts of the Brain and Their Functions


Click Here!

 

The brain has three distinct parts, according to Renvoisé and Morin, and the best way to improve the effectiveness of your message is to direct your communication to the decision-maker area: the so-called old brain, or what the authors name the reptilian brain. It makes decisions by considering input from both the “new brain” and the “middle brain.”

  1. The new brain thinks: It processes rational data.
  2. The middle brain feels: It processes emotions and gut feelings.
  3. The reptilian brain is much less developed than the other two parts of the brain, yet it makes the decisions: Though it takes into account input from the other two areas of the brain, the reptilian brain pulls the actual trigger for decisions.

In the book How the Brain Works, brain researcher Leslie A. Hart writes, “Much evidence now indicates that the reptilian brain is the main switch in determining what sensory input will go to the new brain, and what decisions will be accepted.”

More recently, in Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman, a Nobel Prize winner and psychology professor, brilliantly demonstrated that we have two primary systems in the brain. System 2 (the slow brain) is the so-called smart brain, and System 1 (the reptilian brain) is the fast but primitive brain. After 30 years of research, Kahneman concluded: “System 1 still rules.”

Accordingly, to become successful communicators, marketers need to understand how to get through to the reptilian brain.

The Reptilian Brain

This most primitive section of our brain has not yet had enough time, on an evolutionary scale, for written words to influence it. And because the reptilian brain is so primitive, just six types of stimuli reach it. In that light, let’s look at the reptilian brain (note that some of the following content was taken directly from Neuromarketing).

The reptilian brain…

1. Is self-centered. The reptilian brain has no patience or empathy for anything that does not immediately concern its own well-being and survival. Your entire message should focus on your audience, not you: Your audience must hear what you can do for them before they will pay attention to you. Buyers really don’t care whether you are No. 1 or the leader or the most innovative; they are in buy mode because they have a problem. You need to tell them how you solve it!

2. Likes contrast. The reptilian brain is most sensitive to clear contrast, such as before/after, risky/safe, fast/slow. Without a clear-cut choice, the reptilian brain enters into a state of confusion, leading to delayed decision or no decision at all.

Fundamentally, the reptilian brain is wired to pay attention to disruption or changes of state. Those changes may signal what is going on in our environment, so they receive priority in the way they are processed by our reptilian brain.

3. Needs concise input. Since the reptilian brain can’t process language, the use of complicated words slows down the decoding of your message and automatically places the burden of information processing onto the new brain; as a result, your audience will want to “think” about making the decision more than they will want to “act” and decide now.

The reptilian brain can’t process concepts like “a flexible solution,” or “an integrated approach,” without a great deal of effort and confusion. It appreciates simple, easy-to-grasp ideas like “more money,” “unbreakable,” and “24-hour turnaround time.”

4. Focuses on beginnings and endings. The reptilian brain enjoys openings and finales, and often overlooks what’s in between. Placing the most important content at the beginning is therefore a must, as is repeating it at the end. Here’s why:

For survival, it is in the best interest of your reptilian brain to be most alert at the beginning and end of interactions, in case change or new factor is cause for danger. Anything in the middle of your message will be mostly overlooked because once the reptilian brain becomes comfortable, it often goes into a sort of energy-saving mode and pays less attention to its surroundings, often dropping information in the process.

Psychologists call this phenomenon the primacy and recency effects. “The primacy effect is the beginning; you remember it because that is where you started,” wrote clinical psychologist Devin Kowalczyk. “The recency effect is the finish; you remember the end the best.”

Your opening, when you’re presenting or writing, is crucial. If you do not grab your prospects’ attention in the beginning of and exchange, you may lose them forever.

5. Relies on visual stimuli. The reptilian brain is visual. The optic nerve delivers input to the brain 50 times faster than the auditory nerve does. The visual processing capability of our brain has evolved to this level as a matter of survival. You will jump back from a stick that appears to be a snake before you even think about it.

The brain is therefore both extraordinarily fast and dangerously hasty. It is hardwired to make decisions that are based mostly on visual input. By using visual stimuli in your marketing communications, you ensure that you tap into the processing bias that the brain has developed over thousands of years.

6. Is emotional. The reptilian brain is triggered by emotion. Therefore, we remember events better when we have experienced them with strong emotion. “We are not thinking machines that feel, we are feeling machines that think,” said Antonio Damasio, head of the neuroscience department at UC Irvine.

Taking into account those six characteristics into your marketing communications will give you access to the reptilian brain will immediately improve the effectiveness of your marketing efforts.

The next article in this two-part series explains why specific tactics—such as repetition, use of simple language, and storytelling—will further improve the effectiveness of your marketing efforts.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]