Spotify’s Head of Original Video and Podcasts, Tom Calderone, Departs

Spotify's Head of Original Video and Podcasts, Tom Calderone, Departs

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Spotify will focus its video efforts around Rap Caviar
  • Music industry executives would like Spotify’s video efforts to focus on
  • Spotify has over 60 million paying subscribers

Spotify is parting ways with Tom Calderone, the head of original video and podcasts, after the music-streaming company’s initial round of programs failed to catch on with audiences.

The online pioneer confirmed Calderone’s departure in an email Thursday. Spotify will focus its video efforts around Rap Caviar, the service’s most popular playlist, Rock This and other features, a spokesman said.

With the move, Spotify is narrowing its video ambitions. Calderone, the former head of cable network VH1, commissioned a dozen series from producers including Tim Robbins and Russell Simmons. He also oversaw podcasts, an area of growing importance at the world’s largest paid music service. Now the company is making clearer that it wants videos on the service to stay closer to the music industry.

While Spotify has known for some time it wants to offer more programming beyond music, the company has struggled to settle on a strategy.

Before YouTube, Hulu or Sony introduced online TV services, Spotify tried to assemble a bundle of TV channels for a live video service in Europe. The company abandoned those plans after failing to line up all the channels it wanted for the right price, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Spotify also licensed short-form videos from Vice Media Inc., Viacom’s Comedy Central and Walt Disney Co.’s ESPN in 2015. Then in 2016, the company hired Calderone to oversee an in-house studio. He led Viacom’s VH1 during its heyday and quickly ordered shows including Simmons’s “Traffic Jams,” where musicians composed a song while stuck in traffic and performed the it on reaching their destination.

Despite those efforts, video never been featured prominently within Spotify, a source of frustration for many partners. No series has broken out.

Music industry executives would like Spotify’s video efforts to focus on music. That would bring more attention to their artists and new releases, and not divert royalty-generating listeners to other content. Thanks to Spotify, the music business is growing for the first time in almost two decades and record labels aren’t especially keen to see the company diversify into other forms of entertainment.

And of late, Spotify has tested seeding playlists with music videos and short documentaries, including Rap Caviar.

While Spotify is still formulating a video strategy, its investment in podcasting continues to grow. The company has purchased advertising in popular shows Reply All and The Bill Simmons Podcast, and plans to announce a new slate of original podcasts soon.

The company is planning to go public later this year or early next, and just reached a new long-term deal with Warner Music Group, the third-largest record label.

With more than 60 million paying subscribers for the music service, Spotify has commissioned non-music content to increase the amount of time users spend with the app and keep them from leaving to watch video on YouTube or Facebook. Non-music programming also benefits the company by reducing the share of sales it must hand over to music rights holders.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

LG Electronics India’s marketing head, Amit Gujral, sets a clear vision for 2017

LG Electronics India is going to celebrate this Republic Day with the launch of its #KarSalaam initiative, which is dedicated to the brave soldiers of the country. Through this initiative, LG aims to salute the soldiers’ spirit of selfless contribution and service towards the country. The brand plans to reach out to the citizens through radio, on-ground and digital communication to capture the wishes of the citizens of India for our soldiers. Taking this campaign forward, LG will be contributing a certain amount to every LG product purchased till 26th January towards the ‘India National Defence Fund’, which is dedicated to the welfare of soldiers.

Brand Equity caught up with Amit Gujral, head – corporate marketing, LG Electronics India, who recently joined the company, to have a chat about the idea behind #KarSalaam,
and LG’s plan for the year ahead. Take a look…

“#KarSalaam is not a marketing campaign”

This is Gujral’s first big initiative for the company, and there has been a lot of thought and vision attached to it. He says, “This campaign has been launched to capture the patriotic fervour of the season to establish itself as a brand that cares for Indians and their sentiments. We also took this initiative to bring together the citizens of India to express their gratitude to our soldiers. The selfless devotion our armed forces calls for adulation and what could be a better occasion than this Republic Day.”
The company also plans to invite people through social media platforms and encourage them to #KarSalaam (express their gratitude). All Indians are invited to post their wishes for soldiers on its dedicated website. LG also seeks participation from the families of the soldiers to send their heartwarming messages to their near and dear ones who brave all odds to protect the country.

While talking Gujral about the spends behind the #KarSalaam initiative, he said, “Honestly, it cannot be seen as a marketing campaign. #KarSalaam is a very noble, social and patriotic cause, which cannot be attributed as just a promotion campaign. We invite all citizens to pour their heart out and leave no barriers to reach out to soldiers.”

Amit Gujral
Amit Gujral

‘Life’s Good’ for LG and Gujral?

Consumer Electronics industry in India stands as a conducive market and 2016 has equally clocked growth for LG, informs Gujral. “We have seen a number of new entrants in the industry due to the growth opportunities the Indian market holds. The brand is driven by the philosophy “Life’s Good” and throughout the years we have ensured that we live up to it,” he adds.

For 2017, LG has already created a buzz with the announcement of a host of new products including signature TVs during CES. LG will soon bring those products to the Indian market this year.

When asked about the targets for 2017, Gujral optimistically mentions, “As a marketer, certainly revenue targets are essential to anything and everything we shall plan and do. Not just enhancing brand track indices but increasing revenue generation up by two digits percentage is set as a target for 2017.”

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Startup Makes Wearable Tech to Monitor Vitals, Head Trauma

mc10b

Believe it or not, there are some tech companies that aren’t interested in smartglasses or smartwatches. MC10′s approach to wearable technology has been to completely re-imagine how that technology can be used to monitor and improve a person’s health. It’s technology that can take your vitals, monitor for possible trauma, and even improve the outcome of surgical procedures.

This is accomplished by inventions such as an ultra-thin, skin-like tattoo with tiny dots, called a bio-stamp. The stamp is worn on the surface of the skin to monitor body vitals. A head impact indicator has also been developed with backing from Reebok to detect danger of concussion and other head injuries.

The technology can be used inside the human body as well, with the company also developing an “intelligent catheter.” This has nanometer-thin sensors, and can be inserted into the body giving doctors real-time feedback during a procedure.

These inventions have the potential to revolutionize medicine, representatives from the company say. No longer would a patient be confined to a bed with wires attached. Now they could just wear the thin patch, with a small radio transmitter sending vitals back to the doctors. The patch weighs only three-thousandths of an ounce, so the patient wouldn’t even feel a thing.

The hat, which monitors the head for impact injuries – called “Checklight” – looks like a normal everyday hat – not one which would stand out in any way. If you don’t include the glowing Reebok sensor at the back, that is.

This is all part of what is becoming known in the industry as wireless sensor technology” or “epidermal electronics” and it is taking off fast.

Carmichael Roberts, co-founder and chairman of MC10 told Fox News recently:

“If you think about the evolution of electronics, to the point where your cellphone is such an important device….it’s not something you feel like you’re wearing. We have a product where you don’t even know you have it on.”

Some inventions, such as the Hydration Sensor, send those vital stats back to the person’s smartphone, as you can see in the following video.

David Icke, CEO of MC10tells Reuters:

“You can’t improve what you can’t measure, so if you could instead have a body measurement that happens in an innocuous way, you can then start to measure and track things, and work on improving them.”

Images: MC10

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Startup Makes Wearable Tech to Monitor Vitals, Head Trauma

mc10b

Believe it or not, there are some tech companies that aren’t interested in smartglasses or smartwatches. MC10′s approach to wearable technology has been to completely re-imagine how that technology can be used to monitor and improve a person’s health. It’s technology that can take your vitals, monitor for possible trauma, and even improve the outcome of surgical procedures.

This is accomplished by inventions such as an ultra-thin, skin-like tattoo with tiny dots, called a bio-stamp. The stamp is worn on the surface of the skin to monitor body vitals. A head impact indicator has also been developed with backing from Reebok to detect danger of concussion and other head injuries.

The technology can be used inside the human body as well, with the company also developing an “intelligent catheter.” This has nanometer-thin sensors, and can be inserted into the body giving doctors real-time feedback during a procedure.

These inventions have the potential to revolutionize medicine, representatives from the company say. No longer would a patient be confined to a bed with wires attached. Now they could just wear the thin patch, with a small radio transmitter sending vitals back to the doctors. The patch weighs only three-thousandths of an ounce, so the patient wouldn’t even feel a thing.

The hat, which monitors the head for impact injuries – called “Checklight” – looks like a normal everyday hat – not one which would stand out in any way. If you don’t include the glowing Reebok sensor at the back, that is.

This is all part of what is becoming known in the industry as wireless sensor technology” or “epidermal electronics” and it is taking off fast.

Carmichael Roberts, co-founder and chairman of MC10 told Fox News recently:

“If you think about the evolution of electronics, to the point where your cellphone is such an important device….it’s not something you feel like you’re wearing. We have a product where you don’t even know you have it on.”

Some inventions, such as the Hydration Sensor, send those vital stats back to the person’s smartphone, as you can see in the following video.

David Icke, CEO of MC10tells Reuters:

“You can’t improve what you can’t measure, so if you could instead have a body measurement that happens in an innocuous way, you can then start to measure and track things, and work on improving them.”

Images: MC10

[“source-smallbiztrends”]