Reliance JioMoney Could Well Be a Disruptor, but Not Just Yet

Reliance JioMoney Could Well Be a Disruptor, but Not Just YetReliance JioMoney Could Well Be a Disruptor, but Not Just Yet

HIGHLIGHTS

  • JioMoney is Reliance Jio’s digital wallet
  • You can use it to recharge your accounts or pay offline
  • Login issues plagued our usage over the whole week

Reliance Jio wants to empower 10 million merchants to make digital transactions. The JioMoney appwas supposed to roll out to merchants last week, while Jio users have of course been using it for recharges and P2P payments for a lot longer, ever since the test rollout started almost a year ago now.

At the announcement for Jio Money earlier this month, Reliance Industries Chairman Mukesh Ambani talked about how every Indian now has a digital money wallet linked to their bank account. He spoke about Aadhaar based micro-ATMs at Jio’s eKYC enabled stores. Ambani laid out a massive vision for JioMoney, one that could well disrupt the rapid development we’re seeing in the fintech world.

The ground reality is a little different though – we’ve been using the JioMoney app for a week now – or trying to anyway – and our finding is that much like JioCinema and JioMusic, the JioMoney experience is very much a work in progress at this point.

Both of those apps have been tweaked since we reviewed them, and some of the early problems have been resolved, while a few others still remain. A re-branding also involved a rethink of the UX, which was very welcome. Conceivably, it’s possible that Reliance Jio will put JioMoney through the same kind of process as well, because as of now on day one, or rather week one, there’s no doubt that this kind of re-imagining is required.

jio in app jio_in_app

First up, let’s talk about something basic – logging in. To log in, enter your Jio number and password, and then verify your date of birth. This worked a couple of times, and did not work on many other occasions. In short, simply logging in to JioMoney to start using the app is a frustrating challenge, as there are frequent “Error processing request” messages, which is not helped by the fact that – as a genuinely welcome security measure – you can only attempt to verify your account a set number of times per hour.

Once you actually get into the app, there are all the usual options – the design looks a little clunky right now, but that’s true for all of Jio’s apps during their early days, and like we mentioned earlier, there’s hope that this will eventually change. The app lets you send or request money, pay bills and recharges, pay at a shop, along with a section for coupons, and for giving to charity. The last of these is unusual but that notwithstanding, the offerings are pretty much in line with the industry. You should be able to use the app to pay your Jio bills as well, whenever that comes into effect.

Recharges are a smooth process, with little or no issue as long as you’re able to get into the app. You can recharge other prepaid phone connections, DTH connections, gas payments, and so on. You can transfer money to a bank account using IMPS by using its IFSC code and account number. You can use this to take your money out of Jio as well.

jio barcode jio_barcode

Pay at shop via the Reliance JioMoney app requires you to enter the seller’s phone number or scan a code, after which you enter your mPIN to authorise the transaction. This seems to be a workable way of doing this, but unlike other wallets, whose stickers now emblazon shop after shop, it’s very hard to know where you actually can use JioMoney. Although we were very hopeful that we’d have stories to share about using it in the real world, the sad fact is that all of our transactions – in between many logouts and request processing errors – took place online.

In contrast, we’ve used several other digital wallets throughout the week, to buy everyday items, pay for conveyance, and to grab a bite. A week is too short a time to expect Jio to be massively visible of course, but given Ambani’s pledge of reaching 10 million merchants very soon, it’s going to have to pick up the pace very quickly.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Buying a used cars? These simple tricks could save you time and money

If it’s not the plethora of models and versions available – plus diesels, petrols and hybrids – the choices can seem almost endless before you have even got to the detailed decisions of a used car’s mileage or condition.

However, the reality is that while there are plenty of hurdles to trip you up in the used car market, there is also plenty you can do to help yourself too.

Do a little homework on where and how to fi nd the best deal and you can give yourself a helping hand before you have even taken a test drive.

Buying a used carGETTY STOCK

Buying a used car needn’t cause headaches, just follow a few simple rules

1. CHOICES

The first steps are the most obvious. What do you need your car for?

There is little point in buying a small city car if you are likely to spend hours pounding the motorway but likewise there is no point in buying an expensive sports car if it sits in the train station car park for 90 per cent of the week.

Think about why you are buying this car and why you need it in the first place.

Do you need to regularly transport your family or is this car largely for you alone? Will anyone else be driving it and what are their needs?

Do you need a small hatchback or a large estate, four-wheel drive for tricky lanes or perhaps a crossover for that high-up driving position?

Is your situation likely to change soon with a new baby, children leaving home or even a job switch and how will that affect matters?

Of course, much of the above will be dictated by your budget and what you can afford but give it some serious thought as the last thing you want to do is to have to go through the whole process again.

Used carGETTY

Hybrid and electric cars are still not for everyone

2. FUEL FOR THOUGHT

Although hybrid and electric cars have gained massively in popularity and sales in recent years, they are still not for everyone.

Electric cars, while having improved, are still limited by their range compared to petrols or diesels and if you are doing a lot of motorway miles, then they might prove pricier to run than you think.

Look at online owner forums and read road tests to get a clearer picture of which might suit you.

The same goes for the age-old petrol versus diesel question too.

The latter might boast a better fuel economy at the pumps but you might need to be doing some serious annual mileage to realise that saving.

Some local authorities are penalising diesel drivers too when parking, so be sure to check.

Buying a used carGETTY

Buying a used car from a franchised dealer is undoubtedly the safest place to go shopping

3. BUYING FROM A DEALER

Buying a used car from a franchised dealer is undoubtedly the safest place to go shopping for your next wheels but it is probably the most expensive too.

They will have a larger stock, especially of newer models usually in excellent condition but be sure to shop around to get the best deal for you.

By comparison, independent dealers will be more affordable and usually feature slightly older cars but they cannot usually offer quite the same back-up with their warranties.

Some will be able to sell you independent warranties for a little peace of mind but make sure you read the small print to find out what is covered before signing on the dotted line.

Used carsGETTY STOCK

If you are after a mainstream model, then a car supermarket is a great choice

4. CAR SUPERMARKETS

If you are after a mainstream model, then a car supermarket such as Cargiant is a great choice.

The cars might not have the same level of care and attention bestowed upon them as a dealership but what you will have is great value and plenty of choice.

Look beyond the odd scuffed alloy wheel or higher-than-average mileage and you can fi nd some bargains.

The downsides?

The cars might require some cosmetic TLC but they are a great way to save on time and shoe leather especially with mainstream models as you can see lots of cars in one place at the same time. Instead of looking at one or two Ford Focuses or VW Golfs, you might have ten to choose from, so if you need a car in a hurry, they are a great opportunity.

10. Ford F-150

5. PURCHASING PRIVATELY

Aside from car auctions – which are certainly not for the faint-hearted – buying a car privately is probably the riskiest option here – but it’s also probably the cheapest.

The good news is that private sales can sometimes realise some real well-loved, one-owner bargains.

The bad news is that it can unearth some of the worst cars too. Before going to look at any car make sure you ask about its provenance, details and mileage of the car beforehand so that you can do an HPI check (to verify the car’s mileage and finance status).

Independent inspections by fi rms such as the AA and small garages are often available for a fee but rely on your common sense and you will not go too far wrong – if a car looks and sounds too good to be true, then it probably is.

Check every detail with a keen eye and make sure you take it on a decent test drive, running through all the gears and asking the owner about it.

If you are not confi dent enough to do it on your own, take a friend (two pairs of eyes are always better than one) and if they are mechanically-minded, so much the better. Whichever route you choose, though, when buying your next used car, do not buy a car that you are not 100 per cent happy with.

If it does not feel right, just walk away – there will always be another ten just around the corner.

The power to buy or not is always in your hands, never forget that.

[“Source-express”]

Xiaomi 5X could be the first smartphone to launch under the Lanmi brand, may launch on July 26

Image result for Xiaomi 5X could be the first smartphone to launch under the Lanmi brand, may launch on July 26Picture Courtesy: Mydrivers.com

Xiaomi is working to bring its third sub-brand after Redmi and Mi, which will reportedly be called – Lanmi, confirmed a Chinese micro blogging site – Weibo. As reported earlier, Xiaomi is said to be have already started working on a smartphone which the company is expected to launch under the Lanmi brand. The smartphone could most probably be the – Xiaomi X1. But, a new report making rounds on the web hints that the first smartphone under the Lanmi brand could be – Xiaomi 5X.

Reports suggest that Xiaomi could launch the smartphone on July 26. But there’s no official confirmation by the company as of now. Xiaomi 5X aka Xiaomi X1 has been subjected to several leaks and rumours already and hints that the device may come with dual-camera setup, antenna lines, and LED flash, which will be placed right next to the dual cameras at the back.

The new leak comes in the form of a poster, which shows the device itself. The poster also reveals a lot about the device, starting from its complete specs, and even the price. It is said that the upcoming Xiaomi 5X could be a mid-ranged smartphone. On the pricing front, the upcoming Xiaomi Mi 5X is likely to be priced at CNY 1,999, which is approximately Rs 19,000. This is a tentative pricing detail, and may be revised at the time of launch.

Also Read: Xiaomi’s new sub-brand could be called Lanmi

As per the specifications, the leak hints that the Xiaomi 5X may come with a 5.5-inch display and may run on the latest Android Nougat operating system. However, the new leak reveals no details about the resolution of the display, but a previous leak claimed that it will most likely end up being 1080p, much like many other mid-range phones from Xiaomi.

The smartphone is further expected to be powered by Qulacomm’s Snapdragon 625 processor and may be coupled with 4GB of RAM and 64GB of internal storage. However, a previous leak suggested that the smartphone – Xiaomi 5X may come with Snapdragon 660. So, we aren’t sure about the authencity of the newly leaked poster, and chances are that the specs might change in the final product.

Furthermore, Xiaomi 5X is expected to come with dual cameras (as tipped by another rumour earlier) at the back and include a 5-megapixel sensor on the front. On the design front, the upcoming Xiaomi phone is expected to feature an all-metal body that looks fairly premium, despite being a mid-ranged smartphone.

Meanwhile, the Chinese smartphone maker is also planning to launch the successors of Redmi 4, Redmi Note 4 and Redmi 4A. In the last couple of days, there have been several rumours about the Redmi 5, Redmi 5A and Xiaomi Redmi Note 5 and all of them suggest that all the three handsets will although boast a full-metal body design much like its successors, but, the camera and hardware may see a major refresh.

A report by a Chinese news website – MyDrivers leaked two weeks ago reveals that the new brand as highlighted earlier is supposed to focus on offline sale strategy mainly, unlike Redmi and Mi that aims at online sales. The company is further said to compete with companies like Oppo and Vivo, which are majorly dependent of offline sale.

[“Source-indiatoday.”]

Declared fail: It’s unfair students could not clear third year, says DUSU

New Delhi Members of Delhi University Students Union (DUSU) staged a protest at the university on Wednesday after they claimed that a number of third year students failed in their practicals and in turn failed to clear their third year.

The students claimed that they were not informed that they had to pass individual components of a course in order to clear a subject, and hence their failing in the course was ‘unfair.’

Slogans demanding “third year students be promoted” rang outside gate number four of DU North Campus on Wednesday, as many students gathered to demand that they be promoted, despite failing.

“I had scored 36 out of 45 in theory, and seven out of 15 in internals in Computer Applications which are both above the passing grade of 40%. Even my total score of 56% was above the passing grade. However, they said I have failed the subject because I have scored only 13 out of 40 in my practical exams. I was never told by my teachers, or my college, that I would need to pass theory, practical and internals separately to clear the subject,” said Jyoti, a BCom programme student at Laxmi Bai College.

Members of DUSU claimed that they had received applications asking for help from as many as 2000 students, most of whom had failed the practical component of a subject in their fifth semester.

“We have received at least 700 applications from BCom programme students who failed in practicals in Computer Applications. In addition to this, there have been many students who have had issues in Music, BCom (Hons), and Statistics (Hons),” said Saket Bahuguna, the ABVP spokesperson.

DU officials said that a committee had been formed to look into the issue.

“They will check if students had been misinformed and moot possible solutions,” said an official.

 

[“source-hindustantimes”]