How to Start a Career in the Creative Industry

Want to make a career out of the stuff you make? The creative industries describe business and organization that focus on creativity: music, design, art, publishing, literature, architecture, film, visual arts, fashion, and drama, to name a few.

Within those industries are needs for high-level design, marketing, and advertising professionals.

Why are creative careers so important? They’re creating jobs in the digital sector and the economy at large. “Creatives,” as employees in the creative industry are called, are in high demand.

What’s great about the creative industry? It’s constantly changing, and you get to work with people who are just as passionate as you are.

Let’s take a closer look at how to start your career in the creative industry—and Istituto Europeo di Design (IED) where creatives succeed.

1. Get exposure and make your art

How? Network, network, network, and don’t be afraid to pick up the phone. The more contacts you have in the field you want, the more likely it is that you’ll find work.

Make a few phone calls to companies that interest you, and see what they offer.  Not quite there? Check out their websites, and prepare a few pitches for projects that you’re interested in doing.

If that’s getting you nowhere, find someplace you might want to work and volunteer, apprentice, or intern. Cast your net wide, make the connections, get out there, and do it.

Lorenzo Longo, a designer in Milan since 2006 and graduate of IED, tells about his first experience working for Pirelli tires. He said, “In that occasion Pirelli choose me to be part of their engineers’ team and I developed the design of new tire patterns for them. I worked for Pirelli tires for about one year, in the same period I opened my studio.”

De-Signum, the studio he opened, is a multitasking design enterprise that works across architecture, interior design, and product design.

2. Work hard

This shouldn’t come as a shock: you have to work hard. Positions in the creative industry are competitive, especially if you’re just out of school. The key? Experience and attitude. Get as much experience as you can, and as many key connections as you can while you’re in school. It will pay off.

Longo says, “Creativity is an attitude, it’s very difficult to learn to be creative if you are not curious and interested in everything that surrounds you. You should be as a “parfumeur,” you should learn how to develop your own smell, develop your own spirit of observation, work hard, not be boring, learn how funny it is to be working in team, have patience.”

3. Follow your passion

Do what you love. Don’t worry about what other people think. As long as you care about what you do, respect others, and work hard to make a positive impact, you can make it in the creative industry.

Anna Rogg, coordinator of the Career Services Offices at IED Italy and responsible for the official IED Alumni platform says, “My advice, for young creatives, is to try to share ideas with colleagues, your boss without being jealous, never criticize other people, but try to find always positive sides. Always attending specific courses during weekends, evenings… be up-to-date!”

4. Get the right master’s degree: IED

Ready to launch your career in the creative industry? Already have your bachelor’s degree?

Get the right master’s degree at IED in Italy. With specialized and technical training, real projects with partner companies, and a wide alumni network, IED offers students masters courses in contemporary art, design, fashion, and communication.

Long says he’s still in touch with IED. He says, “It still happens that IED calls me for special projects. I worked for the Campari Group about a year ago.”

Rogg echoes the sentiment. She says, “We help students for twelve months after their graduation. This year we are going to launch our first IED Alumni platform with special deals, partnerships and job postings dedicated to our IED Community. Last year, IED Milan found internships for 92 percent of our former students who recently graduated.”

If you’re looking for a step up in that creative field that you’ve dreamed about forever, now’s your chance. Check out IED and give your creative career the boost it deserves.

Alyssa Walker is a freelance writer, educator, and nonprofit consultant. She lives in the White Mountains of New Hampshire with her family.
[“Source-masterstudies”]

Forbes Career Opportunity: Research Analyst, Insights

F orbes Insights is currently seeking a Senior Research Analyst to assist in interpreting data, formulating reports and other day-to-day tasks focused on executive thought leadership and research programs.

The Senior Research Analyst will have the opportunity to work across all phases of the research process, from quantitative and qualitative research design, fieldwork, and analysis and publication. This role offers a lot of opportunity for hands-on work, innovative thinking and autonomy, as well as the experience of working together on growing team.

Job responsibilities include:

  • Supporting research design efforts and survey authoring
  • Survey programming and analysis of survey data
  • Monitoring data acquisition and producing field reports
  • Preparing data reports from survey platform
  • Building presentations based on survey results
  • Fact-checking research and reports
  • Conducting additional data analyses using traditional and advanced methods

 

Requirements/Preferences:

  • Strong analytic and critical thinking skills
  • 2-3+ years relevant research experience
  • Ability to work under tight deadlines and manage multiple projects at once
  • Some survey programming experience (i.e. Qualtrics, Confirmit)
  • Data visualization experience (i.e. Tableau)
  • Expertise with Excel, PowerPoint, and Word
  • Bachelor’s degree preferred

 

To apply, click here.

To view all opportunities, click here.

Forbes Media is a global media, branding and technology company, with a focus on news and information about business, investing, technology, entrepreneurship, leadership and affluent lifestyles. The company publishes Forbes and Forbes Asia, as well as Forbes.com. The Forbes brand today reaches more than 98 million people worldwide with its business message each month through its magazines and 38 licensed local editions around the globe, Forbes.com, TV, conferences, research, social and mobile platforms. Forbes Media’s brand extensions include conferences, real estate, education, financial services, and technology license agreements.

[“Source-forbes”]

Forbes Career Opportunity: Research Analyst, Insights

F orbes Insights is currently seeking a Senior Research Analyst to assist in interpreting data, formulating reports and other day-to-day tasks focused on executive thought leadership and research programs.

The Senior Research Analyst will have the opportunity to work across all phases of the research process, from quantitative and qualitative research design, fieldwork, and analysis and publication. This role offers a lot of opportunity for hands-on work, innovative thinking and autonomy, as well as the experience of working together on growing team.

Job responsibilities include:

  • Supporting research design efforts and survey authoring
  • Survey programming and analysis of survey data
  • Monitoring data acquisition and producing field reports
  • Preparing data reports from survey platform
  • Building presentations based on survey results
  • Fact-checking research and reports
  • Conducting additional data analyses using traditional and advanced methods

 

Requirements/Preferences:

  • Strong analytic and critical thinking skills
  • 2-3+ years relevant research experience
  • Ability to work under tight deadlines and manage multiple projects at once
  • Some survey programming experience (i.e. Qualtrics, Confirmit)
  • Data visualization experience (i.e. Tableau)
  • Expertise with Excel, PowerPoint, and Word
  • Bachelor’s degree preferred

To apply, click here.

To view all opportunities, click here.

Forbes Media is a global media, branding and technology company, with a focus on news and information about business, investing, technology, entrepreneurship, leadership and affluent lifestyles. The company publishes Forbes and Forbes Asia, as well as Forbes.com. The Forbes brand today reaches more than 98 million people worldwide with its business message each month through its magazines and 38 licensed local editions around the globe, Forbes.com, TV, conferences, research, social and mobile platforms. Forbes Media’s brand extensions include conferences, real estate, education, financial services, and technology license agreements.

Source:-forbes

Mutual Investment is Required in “It’s Their Job, But It’s Your Career”

Robert Segall, author of the new book It’s Their Job But It’s Your Career: The Underground Guide to Career Success, is on a mission.

A veteran human resources executive and founder of human resources firm Career Underground, Segall sent me a review copy and explained his inspiration for the career guide for professionals. He noted that the contract between employee and employer is broken. That viewpoint on the implicit employment contract resounds throughout Segall’s prescription for fixing today’s career ailments. Your employer has a responsibility to you, but so do you for achieving your career.

Being good at your job does not mean you are good at your career. In fact, early on in the book, Segall lists ten reasons why we don’t talk about career, as well as an example of how our collective devaluation of career direction can lead to organizational direction.

He offers an account of human resources using lower salaries because people are seen as a cost. He cautions:

“When we become more value to ourselves, we become more valuable to our employers as well. It’s a mistake to think that we are simply more expensive. Instead, we must remember that our value comes from our effect on the workplace and not just the work product….We have failed to recognize this perspective of career as a mutual investment…..”

I tried to imagine how this book best serves its intended audience. The solutions describe enterprise-level environments in general, but they can fit smaller firms more susceptible to keeping employees motivated when advancement opportunities vary wildly. The ideas can be a starting point to how to develop employees to imagine their careers, even if it may mean moving forward from a firm.

That kind of move in the right context can broaden a network for a smaller firm; a win-win aspect. That perspective permeates the ideas Segall advocates. The end result is a bright tone in between the talks about controlling your career, such as this passage:

“We’re in a world filled with people who have no interest in conflict with one another and would rather agree on nearly everything of substance and matter. We seek to be respected, to be able to come together (or apart) as we please. We want our future world to live as brightly as the golden ages of the past…. This globally integrated world creates opportunities for each of us to connect and do business, if only we have the creativity and initiative to meet the opportunity.”

That win-win perspective enhances any encouragement in taking charge of your networking and skill development:

“…if people around us are generally good and want to help us if they can, then it is our responsibility to engage with them as part of our career development.”

The cost of lost engagement can be high. Segall notes what can result from a dysfunctional process in an organization, such as the cost of a poor recruitment program:

“The dysfunctional employer will have to explain to its remaining workforce why it can’t keep its best talent in its ranks, or if it buries its head in the sand and ignores the absence of its key personnel, the staff will be well aware of the corporate dysfunction and the exit trend will continue.”

I can imagine someone giving this book to an employee to show some ideas to what to expect from career management in general. Or it can be given as an inspiration on what a good workplace should promise to its workforce.

Budding entrepreneurs may also find inspiration in the text. As a matter of fact, I recall a conversation with an interested professional that he felt uncomfortable charging someone for his services – comments from Segall can positively inspire entrepreneurs to get past such psychological hang ups:

“It doesn’t matter what you do for a living. You have skills to offer, and they are part of a solution. The solution you choose to work on shows where your passions lie.”

Entrepreneurs can combine this thought with those from Adrienne Graham’s excellent No You Can’t Pick My Brain.

Regardless of the reason, you should read this book to learn why win-win thinking can enhance and bring value to your teams.

[“source-smallbiztrends”]