The Corporate Partnership Bringing Education And Technology To Rural Ghana

Many girls in rural Africa lack access to education due to factors like gender inequality and familial poverty. But for the past 10 years, a social entrepreneur and former educator in Ghana has been working to change that.

After observing the difficulty many young girls have while trying to access education and stay in school – as well as the lack of innovation in the educational system – social entrepreneur and Ghana native Kafui Prebbie believed he could improve education through technology – so he did.

Prebbie founded TECHAide, a technology company working to digitally deliver educational content to those typically unable to access education in Ghana.

TECHAide provides affordable hotspots, servers, mobile devices, interactive educational software and community computer labs to deliver educational lessons, videos and other content that can be leveraged in rural communities that traditionally lack these resources.

Recently, Prebbie launched the company’s newest product – ASANKA – a mobile hotspot and content delivery system named with a dual meaning: Community Bowl, a Ghanaian reference, and an acronym for All Subjects and New Knowledge Access.

Founded 10 years ago, Prebbie shares the company has reached more than 100,000 students in Ghana. And while TECHAide’s reach validates need, Prebbie wanted to take his technology to a new level – leveraging personal mobile devices to bring education to even more young students across Ghana, a goal that required the help of a strong corporate partner.

Source:-forbes

Google is bringing video reviews to Google Maps

e’re still very far away from real-time Google Street View or satellite imagery on Google Maps, but Google is, for the first time, introducing video in parts of its mapping service. Users who are part of the company’s Local Guides program can now shoot 10-second videos right from the Google Maps app (or upload 30-second clips from their camera roll).

While the company quietly launched this feature for Local Guides about two weeks ago, Google is now also notifying them about it via email and will likely release it publicly in the near future.

Until now, you could only upload still images to Google Maps. Videos, however, can capture a restaurant’s, store’s or sight’s atmosphere far better. Google is also explicitly allowing users to use their videos for personal reviews (as long as they adhere to its usual review policies that also apply to written reviews). Local businesses will, of course, also be able to use this feature to highlight their own products, too.

To record or upload videos to Google Maps, you’ll have to search for and select a place in Google Maps (this is Android-only for now, as far as we can see), scroll down and tap “add a photo,” tap the “Camera” icon and then hold the shutter to record (or you can upload a short video, too).

For now, though, the program is only open to Local Guides on Android, but it looks like Google is also testing this with local businesses already. As far as I can see, though, the videos will be visible on all platforms.

While this may look like a minor update at first, it’ll make for quite a change on Google Maps, especially for local business owners. Snapping a few pictures is pretty easy, after all, but chances are that many of them will soon want to take professional video of their locations, which is far harder and — if they hire a videographer — expensive.

[“Source-techcrunch”]

Tokyo 42 Review: Bringing Together the Best of Grand Theft Auto, Monument Valley, and Hotline Miami?

Tokyo 42 Review: Bringing Together the Best of Grand Theft Auto, Monument Valley, and Hotline Miami?

HIGHLIGHTS
Tokyo 42 has you in the role of an assassin
The gameplay is similar to earlier GTAs and Hotline Miami
It’s the debut title from developer SMAC
Tokyo 42 is a game that wears its inspirations on its sleeve. The art direction is reminiscent of Monument Valley, while its open-world and interactions are derived from earlier Grand Theft Auto games, and its combat has a lot in common with Hotline Miami. However the end result is greater than the sum of its parts.

In Tokyo 42, you’re wanted for a murder you didn’t commit. To clear your name, you become an assassin and murder a huge number of people. Video game logic at its finest.

Nonetheless, the irony does little to take away from the gameplay. Tokyo 42’s core loop has you traipsing across a densely layered isometric cityscape replete with neon hues, and civilians going about their routine. You’ll pick out targets assigned to you, kill them, and then proceed to a specified location on the map to complete a mission.

Tokyo42 t DayMultiplayer tokyo_42Tokyo42 t DayMultiplayer tokyo_42

Regardless of your play style, you’re treated to responsive controls and a reactive world that strikes back as hard as you hit it. With weapons ranging from silent kill katanas, to noisy rocket launchers, how you deal with a mission is entirely up to you.

Fire fights evolve into intricate ballets of bullet hell madness akin to R-Type, or Ikaruga, and death is usually instant, with a single hit being enough to have you starting a mission again. Thanks to a wealth of checkpoints disguised as coffee vending machines, you’re never too far from where you left off.

While trying to complete an objective with outright violence rewards agile reflexes, playing Tokyo 42 stealthily demands patience. You’ll learn enemy patterns, how to avoid them, and tip-toe behind your target to land a killing blow. Get spotted by a foe? Just change your skin with the tap of a button, and move to another location.

Tokyo42 Stealth1 tokyo_42Tokyo42 Stealth1 tokyo_42

It sounds simple enough, particularly when you consider that other titles such as Hitman and Dishonored have a similar premise. In fact, it should be downright boring – but it’s not.
The art style may be akin to Monument Valley, but the sheer burst of colours give this interpretation of Tokyo a look of its own. Taking down targets is similar to Hotline Miami, and it never feels frustrating thanks to the game giving you ample opportunities to complete a mission in stealth or guns blazing, while its music has a calming impact on the proceedings. So much so that despite dying multiple times, we never felt anything close to rage. Quite the opposite really, wherein starting where we left off was refreshing, rather than the mental toll other isometric action titles with a high difficulty tend to be.

Throw in pun-laden dialogue and references to the likes of Die Hard, and Blade Runner, and Tokyo 42 is an entertaining romp. The single-player campaign clocks in at five hours, and there’s multiplayer to look forward to as well. This ends up being an elaborate game of cat and mouse, having players build up their arsenal before being spotted by others – throw in the Trackacat – a recon robot trained to sniff out assassins – and you have just the right amount of depth to it across five different maps ranging from crowded marketplaces to open-air surroundings.

Tokyo42 Action1 tokyo_42

Tokyo42 Action1 tokyo_42

It’s hard to believe that Tokyo 42 is the debut title from developer SMAC as its an extremely polished and enjoyable. At $20 on Steam and Xbox Live (approximately Rs. 1,290), it’s well worth a purchase.

Pros:

Responsive controls
Tokyo’s open-world is gorgeous
Gameplay stays fresh
Cons:

Throwaway story
Rating (out of 10): 9

We played a review copy of Tokyo 42 on PC. The game is available on the PC and Xbox One for $20 (around Rs. 1,290). It will be available on the PS4 in July.

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and subscribe to our YouTube channel.
Tags: Tokyo 42, Tokyo42, SMAC, Mode 7, PC games, PC gaming, Xbox One

[“Source-ndtv”]

Netflix Says Working on Bringing Original Content to India

Netflix Says Working on Bringing Original Content to India

The US-based on-demand streaming website Netflix arrived in the country five months ago and after facing initial hiccups, is geared up to overturn the viewing habits of Indians by acquiring recent Bollywood titles, memorable classic titles and the best of regional cinema (Tamil, Gujarati, Punjabi and Marathi), a top Netflix executive has said.

“It’s early days in India and there’s still much to learn and discover so that we can keep making the Netflix experience better. We are pleased with how consumers in India are discovering Netflix. They like the fact that we are a flat-fee unlimited viewing commercial-free experience, can cancel any time without commitments,” Jessica Lee, head of communications for Asia, Netflix, told IANS in an e-mail interview.

“They can watch as much as they want, any time, anywhere on nearly any internet-connected screen. For now, we quickly see that the shows Indians love are very much similar to what we see in other markets and the top ones are Netflix Originals like ‘Master of None’, ‘Narcos,’ ‘Marvel’s Daredevil’ and ‘Marvel’s Jessica Jones,” Lee added.

Operating in over 190 countries, Netflix has just announced its first original series from the country based on the best-selling novel “Sacred Games” by Indian author Vikram Chandra.

Shot on location in India, this Hindi-English series will be produced in partnership with Phantom Films, one of India’s leading production houses and will be available to Netflix members globally upon completion.

“In 2016, we plan to spend about $5 billion on programing rights including many original and licensed titles around the world. That includes more than 30 new Netflix original series (or seasons of existing series). Most of these will be available to our members everywhere, including India, exclusively on Netflix. That’s more than one full new season of a series every other week,” Lee informed.

Netflix has nearly 34 million international subscribers against 47 million in the US.

At present, video content contributes approximately 40 percent of the total mobile data traffic in India. Various industry estimates predict a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 83 percent for over-the-top (OTT) video content demand in the next five years in the country.

“We are expanding our original film initiative, launching more than 10 films exclusively on Netflix in 2016. We also are adding more kids programming and documentaries. Our goal is to bring Indian cinema to not only all regions of India but to the world so you’ll find Indian film titles in all countries in which Netflix exists, accessible to all our over 81 million members,” noted Lee.

“For example, ‘Brahman Naman’, a coming-of-age comedy by celebrated Indian director ‘Q’ (Qaushiq Mukherjee), will soon be available globally only on Netflix,” she added.

According to Lee, many of their originals are licensed on a global basis and are available everywhere for members to watch.

Some examples include “Marvel’s Daredevil” and “Marvel’s Jessica Jones”, “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” “Grace and Frankie,” “Master of None” and “Narcos and Marco Polo”.

“For documentary lovers, we have ‘What Happened, Miss Simone?,’ the docu-series ‘Chef’s Table,’ ‘Making a Murderer,’ and the Oscar-nominated ‘Virunga’, among others. On the film side, we have ‘Beasts of No Nation’ and ‘The Ridiculous Six’. And for kids, Netflix has dozens of original series including ‘The Adventures of Puss ‘n Boots’ and ‘Dragons: Race to the Edge’ and the upcoming family show ‘Fuller House,’ Lee told IANS.

Refuting reports that the Indian viewers want to watch NetFlix USA and not Netflix India for more content, she said: “In March 2016, If you look at the top 10 shows in the US over the last 12 months, 90 per cent of those are available globally or near globally. If you expand that out to the top 20, it’s 75 per cent. So you do have access to most of the most popular shows on the US service and we are continually working for a global catalogue that erases remaining differences”.

“The aim is to offer a fully global service with a global catalogue so no one has to wait for the hottest new show or movie,” she stated, adding that the world of content licensing has however been very fragmented and regionalised.

“It will take some time, several years at least, to get to an offering that’s the same everywhere. Until then, we strive to offer a compelling service everywhere by licensing the best of TV and film available,” Lee added.

Netflix is also trying to block virtual private networks (VPNs) globally, including for India, which people are joining to access banned content while staying away from the preying eyes of surveilling agencies.

“Using VPNs or proxies to virtually cross borders violates Netflix’s terms of use because of licensing restrictions on TV shows and movies. People will always try and find a way to get the content they want no matter the technological barriers. We recognise that, and that’s why we are trying to offer our content to members globally at the exact same time,” she told IANS.

Download the Gadgets 360 app for Android and iOS to stay up to date with the latest tech news, product reviews, and exclusive deals on the popular mobiles.

Tags: Apps, Home entertainment, Internet, Netflix
[“Source-Gadgets”]