TVR is back! Meet the brand new Griffith

Who knows what the car-shunning Millennials make of it all, but for an entire generation of sports car fans, TVR equates to unruly high performance, perilous sideways excursions and, if we’re completely honest, a frequently challenging ownership experience.

Now meet the all-new, 21st century TVR, the first since a wealthy consortium – headed by computer games magnate and entrepreneur Les Edgar – wrested the company away from Nikolai Smolenski in 2013. The name is familiar: the Griffith first appeared in 1963, but reappeared in 1991. That model is probably the definitive TVR, so it makes sense to dust the badge down for this keenly-awaited revival. Well, it wasn’t going to be Trousertenter, was it?

In many other ways, this stunning looking new car – side-exit exhausts, sculpted front wheelarches, and swoopy body – stays true to TVR’s homespun, old-school recipe. It packs a trusty atmospheric 5.0-litre quad-cam V8, the unit usually seen in Ford’s Mustang, but thoroughly overhauled for duty here by Cosworth to deliver more power and torque. It’s dry sumped to lower the centre of gravity, and has 50/50 weight distribution. You’ll look in vain for any seamless, dual-shift semi-auto transmission: the Griffith uses a Tremec Magnum six-speed manual (even that sounds manly), with a custom lightweight flywheel and clutch, and bespoke gear ratios. With a dry weight of 1,250kg, the new car is tantalisingly light, and boasts a power-to-weight ratio of 400bhp-per-tonne. This should thrust the Griffith into full-bore supercar territory, where forward motion begins to turn surreal: 0-100mph in six and a bit seconds surreal, with a 200mph top speed. And you have to remember to change gear yourself.

But in other key areas, the new Griffith is revolutionary. It’s the first production car to deploy Gordon Murray Design’s iStream technology, which simplifies the manufacturing process while introducing carbon fibre and delivering the sort of structural rigidity TVRs of old could only dream of (the Cerbera, as lovely as it was/still is, almost visibly sags in the middle). The chassis consists of a carbon composite bonded to steel and aluminium, with body panels also in composite. The iStream tech gives the Griffith notable crash performance: the energy loads are directed through front and rear crash structures, leaving the chassis intact. It also has a fully flat underfloor so if a 200mph mission does present itself, you won’t end up troubling air traffic control. Aero? On a TVR?

[“Source-topgear”]

Utah Web Designer at Utah Sites Give Back to the Community He Grew Up In

Utah Sites is a search engine optimization and web design company in Utah whose owners have roots in the Beehive State. Their office is a mix of modern styling with vibrant splashes of orange color – the company’s calling card. A “splash” is what the company is making outside of the office in their local community, and the web design industry. Utah Sites’ transparent communication and efforts to give back to the community has resulted in a whirlwind of exposure for a recent good deed.

Damon Burton, President of Utah Sites web design company, was looking for ways to give back to the community. Giving a donation to benefit the kids in the same school district was Burton’s way of giving back to the community that nurtured him.

Having grown up in the community benefiting from free or reduced programs throughout his K-12 school years, Burton was familiar with the value of school lunch programs. That familiarity is what led the business owner to donate approximately $2,000 towards paying off all delinquent lunch balances at all seventeen Title I schools in Davis County; a donation that helped nearly 300 families.

The positive message has spread throughout the country as different media outlets featured the donation. Coverage included local media outlets:

  • Fox 13
  • Standard-Examiner
  • KSL
  • KUTV

Some of the local stories were syndicated and brought the donation to the national spotlight, including the AP, WashingtonPost.com and more.

“I can’t even begin to imagine the impact you just made on those kids’ and families lives. I had no idea doing something like this was even possible,” messaged a Chicago resident to Burton.

Burton remarks on such comments. “The media exposure of this donation is an eye-opener for me and many more people. It has been a beautiful thing to witness what this donation has inspired in others. I’ve had people message me from a dozen different states and even internationally saying that the donation has opened their minds to new possibilities in how they can help others.”

Burton and Utah Sites plan on continuing to give back to the community. To learn more about the donation or for other ways to help Utah communities, visit UtahSites.com.

About Utah Sites

Utah Sites web design company in Layton, Utah. This group of Davis County website designers offers affordable, effective website development with a refreshingly personal approach to communicating with their web design customers.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/3228494#ixzz4Y53PtCZT

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Can the Blackberry Priv Android Device Tempt You Back?

BlackBerry is hoping its new and oddly named Priv mobile device will win the company back some of the widespread business usership it has lost to competitors in the mobile market. Recently launched, the Priv is BlackBerry’s very first Android phone. It’s also the first Android phone in forever to feature an old school slide-out keyboard that defies the touch screen standard.

The Blackberry Priv matches everything the Apples, LGs and Samsungs of this world have to offer  — on paper at least. Going for $700 in the U.S., this phone is more expensive than most handsets, and is probably going to be a preference for serious business users. The phone is already available in AT&T retail stores in the U.S. and at BlackBerry.com.

LG, Samsung and other Android titans focus on manufacturing handsets that are faster, thinner and better at taking photos. But the Priv’s long battery life, slide-out physical keyboard focus on Priv (short for privacy) makes it stand out from the crowd. That’s even compared to Apple’s ruling iPhone.

“I have said many times that BlackBerry would not release an Android smartphone unless we could make it private and secure. I’m pleased to say that day has arrived,” John Chen, Executive Chairman and CEO of BlackBerry said in an official release. “With BlackBerry’s patented keyboard and the full complement of applications found in Google Play, this device expands our cross-platform strategy and gives end users the best in security, privacy and productivity, with no compromises on applications.”

At first glance the Blackberry Priv is a smart-looking phone, thanks to its sharp edges offset with smooth curves. Stare a little longer and you will notice finer details like the “grippy” back that small handed users should appreciate.

The 5.4-inch Blackberry Priv has both a virtual and a physical keyboard. The physical keyboard should be effective for business users including company executives who take notes and type longer emails while on the go. The keyboard also features on-screen numbers that allow for faster typing experience, compared to using a virtual keyboard.

The handset also sports a 18MP camera and is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 processor and supported by a powerful battery that can last up to 22.5 hours with mixed usage.

The Blackberry Priv currently runs on Android Lollipop, but the company says that a software update to the current version, called Marshmallow, is coming soon.

BlackBerry was founded in 1984 and is currently based in Waterloo, Ontario. The company has its presence all over the world, including Asia Pacific, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, Europe and North America. The company is also known for data security which will be a major selling point for the new Blackberry Priv device.

The BlackBerry Priv is a unique phone, to say the least, and arguably the company’s best chance to begin clawing back to the mobile empire it once ruled.

Image: Blackberry

[“source-smallbiztrends”]

Can the Blackberry Priv Android Device Tempt You Back?

blackberry priv

BlackBerry is hoping its new and oddly named Priv mobile device will win the company back some of the widespread business usership it has lost to competitors in the mobile market. Recently launched, the Priv is BlackBerry’s very first Android phone. It’s also the first Android phone in forever to feature an old school slide-out keyboard that defies the touch screen standard.

The Blackberry Priv matches everything the Apples, LGs and Samsungs of this world have to offer  — on paper at least. Going for $700 in the U.S., this phone is more expensive than most handsets, and is probably going to be a preference for serious business users. The phone is already available in AT&T retail stores in the U.S. and at BlackBerry.com.

LG, Samsung and other Android titans focus on manufacturing handsets that are faster, thinner and better at taking photos. But the Priv’s long battery life, slide-out physical keyboard focus on Priv (short for privacy) makes it stand out from the crowd. That’s even compared to Apple’s ruling iPhone.

“I have said many times that BlackBerry would not release an Android smartphone unless we could make it private and secure. I’m pleased to say that day has arrived,” John Chen, Executive Chairman and CEO of BlackBerry said in an official release. “With BlackBerry’s patented keyboard and the full complement of applications found in Google Play, this device expands our cross-platform strategy and gives end users the best in security, privacy and productivity, with no compromises on applications.”

At first glance the Blackberry Priv is a smart-looking phone, thanks to its sharp edges offset with smooth curves. Stare a little longer and you will notice finer details like the “grippy” back that small handed users should appreciate.

The 5.4-inch Blackberry Priv has both a virtual and a physical keyboard. The physical keyboard should be effective for business users including company executives who take notes and type longer emails while on the go. The keyboard also features on-screen numbers that allow for faster typing experience, compared to using a virtual keyboard.

The handset also sports a 18MP camera and is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 processor and supported by a powerful battery that can last up to 22.5 hours with mixed usage.

The Blackberry Priv currently runs on Android Lollipop, but the company says that a software update to the current version, called Marshmallow, is coming soon.

BlackBerry was founded in 1984 and is currently based in Waterloo, Ontario. The company has its presence all over the world, including Asia Pacific, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, Europe and North America. The company is also known for data security which will be a major selling point for the new Blackberry Priv device.

The BlackBerry Priv is a unique phone, to say the least, and arguably the company’s best chance to begin clawing back to the mobile empire it once ruled.

Image: Blackberry

[“source-smallbiztrends”]