Samsung Galaxy S7, Galaxy S7 Edge Available With Upgrade Programme

Samsung Galaxy S7, Galaxy S7 Edge Available With Upgrade Programme

Samsung’s new Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge smartphones are all set to go on sale in 60 countries on March 11. The South Korean company ahead of the availability of the handsets is running a Samsung Upgrade Programme in the UK which provides consumers the option to exchange their existing handset and upgrade to the latest Samsung Galaxy handset for a limited period before and after the release of that handset.

The new move by Samsung is said to drive demand for the new Galaxy phones. It’s worth mentioning that Apple last year had announced a program that allowed users to finance unlocked versions of the new iPhones through monthly instalments starting at $32 (roughly Rs. 2,128), regardless of carrier.

Under this scheme, if a consumer buys the Samsung Galaxy S7 or Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge with 24 monthly payments, they can opt to upgrade to the next flagship in 12 months.Samsung in its official Upgrade Programme document explains, “On placing your order for a new handset, you may, if you choose to do so by ticking the relevant box on our website, and if you are successful in passing any relevant credit checks by our chosen credit providers, be able to take part in the Upgrade Programme.”

The company however clears that for participating in the Upgrade Programme, consumers must purchase the Galaxy handset by monthly instalments, which will spread the payments over a period of 24 months.

(Also see: Samsung Galaxy S7, S7 Edge First Look)

Samsung has also fixed limits for the Upgrade Programme and notes that it only applies to the handsets for now.

Detailing further the scheme, the document adds, “At the end of the first year of your finance agreement, subject to 3.6, you may, if you choose and are eligible to do so, upgrade to the latest Samsung Galaxy handset. If you choose to do this, and you meet the conditions set out in these terms regarding the new finance agreement and your existing handset, we will settle the outstanding balance on your original finance agreement provided you are not in arrears and are up to date with payments under the agreement. You will be required to enter into a new 24 month finance agreement relating to the purchase of the new (upgraded) handset. We will notify you if the Upgrade Programme is available to you in any given year.”

(Also see: Samsung Galaxy S7, S7 Edge Top 7 Features: Always-On Display, Dual Pixel Camera, and More)

To recall, some of the biggest additions in the new Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge is the hybrid dual SIM (available in some regions). Both the phones support expandable storage via microSD card (up to 200GB).

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Samsung Galaxy S7

Samsung Galaxy S7

DISPLAY

5.10-inch

PROCESSOR

1.6GHz

FRONT CAMERA

5-megapixel

RESOLUTION

1440×2560 pixels

RAM

4GB

OS

Android 6.0

STORAGE

32GB

REAR CAMERA

12-megapixel

BATTERY CAPACITY

3000mAh

See full Samsung Galaxy S7 specifications
Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge

Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge

DISPLAY

5.50-inch

PROCESSOR

1.6GHz

FRONT CAMERA

5-megapixel

RESOLUTION

1440×2560 pixels

RAM

4GB

OS

Android 6.0

STORAGE

32GB

REAR CAMERA

12-megapixel

BATTERY CAPACITY

3600mAh

See full Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge specifications
Tags: Mobiles, Samsung, Samsung Galaxy S7, Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge, Samsung Mobiles, Samsung Upgrade Program
[“Source-Gadgets”]

What Happens When Facial Recognition Tools Are Available to Everyone

What Happens When Facial Recognition Tools Are Available to Everyone

Chances are, you’re already familiar with facial-recognition software, even if you’ve never spent time in an artificial-intelligence lab. The algorithm that Facebook uses for tagging photos, for example, is a version of facial-recognition software that can identify faces with 97.3 percent accuracy.

The problem with most of today’s facial-recognition software, however, is that it’s computationally very intensive and difficult to use for more than just matching simple photos. If you could speed up the process of recognizing faces, add the ability to track facial features and make it so easy that it could be used as a smartphone app by anyone – then it might open up important new opportunities.

That’s the goal of AI researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Human Sensing Laboratory. Starting in February, they will make available their facial-image-analysis software to fellow researchers. The software, known as IntraFace, is fast and efficient enough that it can be installed as a smartphone app.

For now, to give a preview of what to expect, the researchers have made available free demonstration smartphone apps, which show how IntraFace can identify facial features and detect emotions. These can be downloaded from the website for the Human Sensing Laboratory, from Apple’s App Store or from Google Play.

The project’s lead researcher, Fernando De la Torre, associate research professor in the robotics department of Carnegie Mellon University, said he is already starting to see enormous interest within the AI field for IntraFace. “Now it’s time to develop new applications for this technology. We have a few of our own, but we believe there are lots of people who may have even better ideas once they get their hands on it.”

Duke University medical researchers, for example, are using IntraFace as part of an advanced tool to screen for autism. Doctors and clinicians might be able to monitor or detect a number of pathologies, including depression or anxiety, by checking out facial expressions of patients.

One everyday use for facial-recognition analysis might be vehicles that can recognize a distracted driver behind the wheel. In the demo video for IntraFace, there’s the example of a father behind the wheel of a vehicle who turns around to comfort a screaming toddler in a car seat for a split second before being warned that he’s veered off the road.

And sales and marketing teams are going to love this once the technology becomes commercially available: Imagine being able to evaluate what people think about your products just by reading their faces. The Carnegie Mellon researchers refer to this as “audience reaction measurement,” and they see potential applications being used by public speakers to gauge how well they’re winning over the crowd. But you could also imagine biometric trackers on billboards, checking out how the crowd is responding to an advertisement.

You could also envision IntraFace being used by dating apps once the technology becomes commercially available. Not sure whether you should approach the target of your amorous intentions? Use the IntraFace app to read the facial features of that handsome guy or beautiful girl and get the green light to proceed.

IntraFace is the result of a decade of work by De la Torre and his colleagues, including Jeffrey Cohn, a professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh and an adjunct professor in CMU’s Robotics Institute. The researchers used machine learning techniques to train the software to recognize and track facial features. The researchers then created an algorithm that can take this generalized understanding of the face and personalize it for an individual, enabling expression analysis.

However, as with any potentially breakthrough technology, there’s the flip side. Making facial recognition software widely available is surely going to attract the attention of consumer privacy advocates – it’s one thing if Facebook uses it to tag you or a friend in a photo; it’s quite another if a camera captures your expressions when you’re not expecting it. Just remember the commentary last year around the “creepy” aspects of DeepFace, Facebook’s facial-recognition software.

There might be national security implications, as well – being able to recognize the face of a terrorist in a crowd, for example, has always been one potential application for facial-tracking software. That type of technology, which once seemed to be just science fiction when it appeared in the first “Terminator” film, is already available to law enforcement agencies. The FBI, for example, uses facial-recognition software to match names to faces in a crowd, based on information in a biometric database.

On the whole, though, the positives outweigh the negatives when it comes to automated facial-expression analysis. For nearly 20 years, AI researchers have been working on it. Now it looks as if it may be coming to a smartphone near you in 2016.

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Netflix Says Will Block Proxy Access to Content Not Available Locally

Netflix Says Will Block Proxy Access to Content Not Available Locally

Netflix doesn’t mind its users sharing their account with friends and family but the popular on-demand streaming service disapproves of the usage of unblockers and proxies. The company has announced that it will be blocking such tools in the coming weeks. As a result, you are unlikely to be able to stream shows and movies that are not available in your region.

The video streaming giant has long expressed its concerns over the usage of tools that allow users to fake their location to access content that isn’t available in their home country. But so far, Netflix has maintained a relaxed approach towards it, turning a blind eye to the fact that many of its users are indulging in such practices. That has changed.

[…] in coming weeks, those using proxies and unblockers will only be able to access the service in the country where they currently are,” David Fullagar, Netflix’s vice president of content delivery architecture, wrote in a blog post. “We are confident this change won’t impact members not using proxies.”

Netflix ‘s catalogue houses more than 34,000 movies, documentaries, and TV shows titles. However, not all content is available in every region. For instance, Kevin Spacey-starrer House of Cards is not available in India. This sort of unavailability of content, as you can imagine, has led many users to use apps and services such as Smartflix that circumvent the geo-location barriers and provide users access to a wider catalogue.

To understand Netflix’s move, you have to realise that the company has a partnership with content owners, and it has to respect the licensing deals in every region. Moving forward, however, Netflix intends to sort out its licensing deals so that all of its content is available everywhere. But that is likely going to take years. To recall, Netflix launched its service in India and 129 other countries earlier this month.

“If all of our content were globally available, there wouldn’t be a reason for members to use proxies or ‘unblockers’ to fool our systems into thinking they’re in a different country than they’re actually in. We are making progress in licensing content across the world and, as of last week, now offer the Netflix service in 190 countries, but we have a ways to go before we can offer people the same films and TV series everywhere,” Fullagar added.

[“source-Gadgets”]