After Galaxy Note 8, Samsung plans to launch a foldable Galaxy Note phone in 2018: Report

Samsung plans to launch a foldable Galaxy Note next year

Samsung announced the Galaxy Note 8 – the phablet that succeeds last year’s Note 7 in India on Tuesday at a price tag of Rs 67,990. Soon after the launch of the new flagship device by the South Korean smartphone maker, rumours are that the company has started working on its next Galaxy device. No it not note Note 9, instead the South Koran smartphone maker is gearing up to announce a phone with bendable display. Going by the rumours floating on the internet, Samsung is reportedly planning to launch the foldable phone by mid-next year i.e 2018. This bit of information comes from Samsung mobile chief executive — DJ Koh. Although, Samsung is yet to confirm the making of the phone.

DJ Koh reportedly said that the foldable smartphone that Samsung is planning to bring in 2018 will be launched under its Galaxy Note brand. He further adds that Samsung is targeting 2018 for the launch of a phone with bendable display. But then there are several hurdles, he notes. Koh didn’t explain the hurdles though.

But Koh did say that if the hurdle rises, chances are that the company may push the launch date. The reports claim that Samsung will launch the phone with bendable display – name of which is still unknown by mid next year. It further highlights that the foldable smartphone is expected to enter production during the fourth quarter of 2017. Koh didn’t reveal any further details about the bendable phone as of now.

Also Read: Samsung Galaxy Note 8 launched at Rs 67,900: Specs, features and everything to know

Samsung’s aim to launch a bendable phone is nothing new. There have been a lot of rumours circulating on the same for a long time now. Some previously leaked reports suggest that Samsung’s upcoming foldable smartphone will probably be called – Galaxy X. This foldable phone was first spotted in a patent filing last year. The app showed that the phone will boast a sleek design. Some reports also claimed that the foldable phone can be — “folded or unfolded semi automatically.”

Reports are also such that the foldable phone or the Galaxy X is expected to come with artificial intelligence-enabled speaker, which Samsung may announce very soon. This upcoming speaker by Samsung is said to counter Amazon Echo, Google Home and Apple HomePod.

Meanwhile Samsung recently launched the Galaxy Note 8 in India. The phablet succeeds the Note 7 and comes with a stylus — the S Pen. In India, the Galaxy Note 8 will be available for buying starting from September 21 — with pre-orders beginning from today — both online and offline in Midnight Black and Maple Gold colour options. The phablet will be available exclusively via Samsung’s own store and Amazon India. The Galaxy Note 8 comes with 6.3-inch infinity display and dual rear cameras. The phone runs on the Android Nougat OS and is powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 processor.

[“Source-indiatoday”]

US markets lower after tech reversal from record highs

Businessman sleeping with bear with down trend graph

US markets closed lower on Thursday after technology sector rolled over.

The Nasdaq composite closed 0.6% lower at 2,475.42 and fell more than 1% earlier in the session. The S&P 500 also closed lower at 6,382.19, slipping 0.1% as tech stocks dropped 0.8 % to lead decliners.

The tech sector had notched an intraday record earlier in the session, along with the Nasdaq and the S&P.

Tech faced pressure as investors took profits off the table following strong earnings from companies in the space.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average, outperformed, closing 85.54 points higher at 21,796.55 level and notching intraday and closing records.

Meanwhile, initial jobless claims came in at 244,000, slightly above the expected 240,000. Durable goods orders, meanwhile, rose 6.5% in June.

Disclaimer: The contents herein is specifically prepared by ‘Dalal Street Investment Journal’, and is for your information & personal consumption only. India Infoline Limited or Dalal Street Investment Journal do not guarantee the accuracy, correctness, completeness or reliability of information contained herein and shall not be held responsible.

[“Source-indiainfoline”]

After Musk Remark, Zuckerberg Shares One Reason Why He’s So Optimistic About AI

After Musk Remark, Zuckerberg Shares One Reason Why He's So Optimistic About AI

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The battle of billionaire geeks continues
  • After Musk insulted Zuckerberg, Facebook chief executive has responded
  • Zuckerberg says he remains optimistic about AI

Hours after billionaire Elon Musk made a public aspersion about Mark Zuckerberg’s knowledge, by saying Facebook chief executive’s understanding of artificial intelligence is “limited,” Zuckerberg has reaffirmed why he is so optimistic about the nascent technology. To recall, Musk was responding to Zuckberberg’s comments made during a Facebook Live broadcast, where the Facebook CEO called out naysayers.

In a public post, Zuckerberg congratulated his company’s AI research division for winning the best paper award at the “top” computer vision conference for research in “densely connected convolutional networks” subject.

In the same post, Zuckerberg shared “one reason” why he is so optimistic about AI. These efforts, he said, could bring “improvements in basic research across so many different fields — from diagnosing diseases to keep us healthy, to improving self-driving cars to keep us safe, and from showing you better content in News Feed to delivering you more relevant search results.”

“Every time we improve our AI methods, all of these systems get better. I’m excited about all the progress here and it’s potential to make the world better,” Zuckerberg said, whose company already uses a range of AI-powered tools to, among other things, serve relevant posts to around two billion people on the planet.

Zuckerberg’s remarks comes merely hours after Tesla and Space X founder and CEO Elon Muskcriticised Zuckerberg’s inability to foresee the evil side of artificial intelligence. Musk believes that all these AI efforts need to be regulated by the government, as otherwise there is a chance one day these AI-powered robots would kill humans, in what he describes as the “doomsday” scenario.

Over the weekend, in a Facebook Live session, Zuckerberg without calling out Musk, said “naysayer’s” predictions about “doomsday scenarios” were “irresponsible.” When a user asked about Musk’s views on Zuckeberg’s remarks, Musk tweeted Tuesday that he has spoken to Mark Zuckerberg and reached the conclusion that his understanding of AI is limited.

[“Source-gadgets.ndtv”]

Photographs of Manchester bomb parts published after leak

The pictures indicate it was carried in a blue rucksack made by the Karrimor outdoor company.

Extraordinary details about the bomb used in the Manchester atrocity have been published in the New York Times, almost all of it forensic evidence gathered by the British police at the scene.

A series of photographs of the remains of the bomb, the detonator and what appeared to be a rucksack were leaked. The preliminary investigation by the police is extremely detailed, down to the belief that the killer, Salman Abedi, held the small detonator in his left hand.

Suspicion on who leaked it to the US-based reporter rested on US officials, who have been feeding a series of details about the Manchester bombing to American journalists.

Leaking such inside information from the investigation will add to tensions between the US and UK over the extent to which much of the investigation is being leaked by authorities in America.

The latest revelations came hours after the home secretary, Amber Rudd, expressed irritation with the US and expressed hope that the leaks would stop.

An image of what is believed to be the detonator, released by the New York Times.

“The British police have been very clear that they want to control the flow of information in order to protect operational integrity, the element of surprise. So it is irritating if it gets released from other sources and I have been very clear with our friends that should not happen again,” the home secretary said.

Although her language was mild, it is rare for a UK politician to issue such a rebuke to the Americans.

Rudd called the US secretary of homeland security, John Kelly, on Tuesday to ask for the leaks to stop. UK officials were stunned and angry on Wednesday when the crime scene photographs appeared in the New York Times.

The photographs suggest the bomb was relatively sophisticated, requiring a degree of expertise. It contained a powerful explosive in a lightweight metal container. The pictures indicate it was carried in a blue rucksack made by the Karrimor outdoor company.

Such was the power of the blast that nuts and screws packed round the bomb penetrated doors and walls. Abedi stood in the middle of a crowd. The upper part of his body was thrown towards the entrance to the arena.

It was not a crudely made bomb, as among the evidence recovered was a Yuasa 12-volt, 2.1 amp lead-acid battery, which is more expensive than normal over-the-counter ones. The detonator appeared to have a small circuit board soldered inside one end.

There seemed to have been several options for detonating it, such as a simple manual switch or possibly remotely by a radio signal.

The latest disclosures come on top of a series of leaks from US officials about the British investigation, including the naming of the killer.

The leak of the British information, as well as demonstrating a lack of respect for a US ally at an emotional time, will have hindered the investigation, where it is deemed essential to control the release of details.

UK counter-terrorism specialists said they needed to keep secret the name of any perpetrator or suspect for at least 36 hours to ensure there was an element of surprise in approaching relatives, friends and others.

The home secretary reflected the frustration and dismay of the UK security services in a series of interviews on Wednesday morning.

Adding to the sense of anger in the UK were further leaks from an NBC reporter who quoted US intelligence officials providing other details about the killer.

Tributes to the victims in St Ann’s Square in Manchester. Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA

The reporter Richard Engel of NBC tweeted details not released by the UK. Engel said US intelligence officers told him family members of the the killer, Salman Abedi, had warned UK security officials about him and had described him as dangerous.

The intelligence community has long been uncomfortable about revelations from its recent past made in books and articles, but the release of details of a live investigation on the scale of those by the US and France is a relatively new phenomenon.

It comes on top of Donald Trump’s release of intelligence to Russia that had been passed on by Israel, which had obtained it from an Arab country.

American officials in Washington briefed US journalists early on Tuesday about the number of dead, confirming that it was a suicide bombing and – hours later – the name of the killer. The UK had not been planning to release the name on Tuesday.

The UK’s reluctance to identify the assailant was evident because it took hours after his name was circulating in the US media before Greater Manchester police confirmed it.

One of the basic tenets of intelligence sharing is that other agencies do not disclose it. The problem is that those intelligence agencies, whether American or French, pass it up to their presidents, prime ministers and departmental ministers. In the past, that secrecy was respected.

After the leaks, it could be tempting for UK police and intelligence services to stop sharing sensitive information, although Britain relies heavily on the US sharing its intelligence and benefits from intelligence, especially on counter-terrorism, from European colleagues such as France and Germany.

Adding to the impression of western security services as uncoordinated and amateurish, the French interior minister, Gérard Collomb, then told French television on Wednesday that Abedi had been in Libya and possibly Syria, information UK police had not disclosed.

Soldiers and armed police patrol near the Houses of Parliament. Photograph: Facundo Arrizabalaga/EPA

The top Democrat on the House intelligence committee, Adam Schiff, said he did not know the source but insisted it was not from Congress, as members and their staffs had not been briefed.

Schiff, who is a driving force behind the congressional investigation into the Trump campaign’s links with Russia, said: “We should have been very careful and respectful of the British investigation and the timing which the British felt was in their investigative interests in releasing that. That should have been their discretion not ours. If that is something we did, I think that’s a real problem.”

[“Source-ndtv”]