Photographs of Manchester bomb parts published after leak

The pictures indicate it was carried in a blue rucksack made by the Karrimor outdoor company.

Extraordinary details about the bomb used in the Manchester atrocity have been published in the New York Times, almost all of it forensic evidence gathered by the British police at the scene.

A series of photographs of the remains of the bomb, the detonator and what appeared to be a rucksack were leaked. The preliminary investigation by the police is extremely detailed, down to the belief that the killer, Salman Abedi, held the small detonator in his left hand.

Suspicion on who leaked it to the US-based reporter rested on US officials, who have been feeding a series of details about the Manchester bombing to American journalists.

Leaking such inside information from the investigation will add to tensions between the US and UK over the extent to which much of the investigation is being leaked by authorities in America.

The latest revelations came hours after the home secretary, Amber Rudd, expressed irritation with the US and expressed hope that the leaks would stop.

An image of what is believed to be the detonator, released by the New York Times.

“The British police have been very clear that they want to control the flow of information in order to protect operational integrity, the element of surprise. So it is irritating if it gets released from other sources and I have been very clear with our friends that should not happen again,” the home secretary said.

Although her language was mild, it is rare for a UK politician to issue such a rebuke to the Americans.

Rudd called the US secretary of homeland security, John Kelly, on Tuesday to ask for the leaks to stop. UK officials were stunned and angry on Wednesday when the crime scene photographs appeared in the New York Times.

The photographs suggest the bomb was relatively sophisticated, requiring a degree of expertise. It contained a powerful explosive in a lightweight metal container. The pictures indicate it was carried in a blue rucksack made by the Karrimor outdoor company.

Such was the power of the blast that nuts and screws packed round the bomb penetrated doors and walls. Abedi stood in the middle of a crowd. The upper part of his body was thrown towards the entrance to the arena.

It was not a crudely made bomb, as among the evidence recovered was a Yuasa 12-volt, 2.1 amp lead-acid battery, which is more expensive than normal over-the-counter ones. The detonator appeared to have a small circuit board soldered inside one end.

There seemed to have been several options for detonating it, such as a simple manual switch or possibly remotely by a radio signal.

The latest disclosures come on top of a series of leaks from US officials about the British investigation, including the naming of the killer.

The leak of the British information, as well as demonstrating a lack of respect for a US ally at an emotional time, will have hindered the investigation, where it is deemed essential to control the release of details.

UK counter-terrorism specialists said they needed to keep secret the name of any perpetrator or suspect for at least 36 hours to ensure there was an element of surprise in approaching relatives, friends and others.

The home secretary reflected the frustration and dismay of the UK security services in a series of interviews on Wednesday morning.

Adding to the sense of anger in the UK were further leaks from an NBC reporter who quoted US intelligence officials providing other details about the killer.

Tributes to the victims in St Ann’s Square in Manchester. Photograph: Andy Rain/EPA

The reporter Richard Engel of NBC tweeted details not released by the UK. Engel said US intelligence officers told him family members of the the killer, Salman Abedi, had warned UK security officials about him and had described him as dangerous.

The intelligence community has long been uncomfortable about revelations from its recent past made in books and articles, but the release of details of a live investigation on the scale of those by the US and France is a relatively new phenomenon.

It comes on top of Donald Trump’s release of intelligence to Russia that had been passed on by Israel, which had obtained it from an Arab country.

American officials in Washington briefed US journalists early on Tuesday about the number of dead, confirming that it was a suicide bombing and – hours later – the name of the killer. The UK had not been planning to release the name on Tuesday.

The UK’s reluctance to identify the assailant was evident because it took hours after his name was circulating in the US media before Greater Manchester police confirmed it.

One of the basic tenets of intelligence sharing is that other agencies do not disclose it. The problem is that those intelligence agencies, whether American or French, pass it up to their presidents, prime ministers and departmental ministers. In the past, that secrecy was respected.

After the leaks, it could be tempting for UK police and intelligence services to stop sharing sensitive information, although Britain relies heavily on the US sharing its intelligence and benefits from intelligence, especially on counter-terrorism, from European colleagues such as France and Germany.

Adding to the impression of western security services as uncoordinated and amateurish, the French interior minister, Gérard Collomb, then told French television on Wednesday that Abedi had been in Libya and possibly Syria, information UK police had not disclosed.

Soldiers and armed police patrol near the Houses of Parliament. Photograph: Facundo Arrizabalaga/EPA

The top Democrat on the House intelligence committee, Adam Schiff, said he did not know the source but insisted it was not from Congress, as members and their staffs had not been briefed.

Schiff, who is a driving force behind the congressional investigation into the Trump campaign’s links with Russia, said: “We should have been very careful and respectful of the British investigation and the timing which the British felt was in their investigative interests in releasing that. That should have been their discretion not ours. If that is something we did, I think that’s a real problem.”

[“Source-ndtv”]

Girl, 13, Begged Father For Money To Treat Cancer. Video Viral After Death

Girl, 13, Begged Father For Money To Treat Cancer. Video Viral After Death

Sai Shri’s parents had been separated for eight years and she had been living with her mother

“Daddy…please do something and save me” – says a 13-year-old girl in an incredibly tragic WhatsApp video to her father, begging him for money for her cancer treatment. Young Sai Shri died on Sunday in Andhra Pradesh’s Vijayawada, but her tearful voice is being heard by thousands through the video that has been widely shared online.

Sai Shri’s parents had been separated for eight years and she had been living with her mother. In the video, she pleads with her father, Shetty Shivakumar, to sell her home – which was in her name – to raise money for her treatment. Her mother had reportedly tried to sell the house but was stopped by her father, who allegedly got help from a politician to try and throw his estranged family out.

Sai was diagnosed with cancer in August, and doctors reportedly told her mother that a bone marrow transplant was the only option.

Speaking in Telugu in the excruciating video, she shows swellings and lesions on her arms and legs and shares that she is in great pain.

“Daddy, you say that you don’t have money. At least we have this house. Please sell this house and pay for my treatment daddy. Or else, they (doctors) say that I won’t survive for long,” she weeps.

“I haven’t gone to school in months. I want to play with my friends…I want to go to school…take my exam…I want to become a doctor…”

Based on a complaint by an activist, the Andhra Pradesh State Human Rights Commission has asked the police to investigate whether Mr Shivakumar, who lives in the same city, was guilty of neglecting his daughter.

Activists allege that Mr Shivakumar refused to spend money for his daughter’s treatment even though he could afford it.

Sai’s mother Sumashri had reportedly spent Rs. 30 lakh but the treatment was not good enough for the type of cancer that she was suffering from.

[“source-ndtv”]

Syria civil war: UN calls emergency talks after ‘gas attack’

Destruction at a hospital room in Khan Sheikhoun. April 4, 2017The UN Security Council is to hold emergency talks after an alleged chemical attack in Syria left dozens of civilians dead and wounded.

The release of chemicals in a rebel-held town in Idlib province brought furious international reaction.

Officials in Damascus deny opposition and Western claims that they used chemical weapons.

Russia’s defence ministry said a Syrian air strike had hit a rebel ammunition store that included chemical weapons.

In particular, “a workshop for the production of land mines filled with poisonous substances” had been hit, it said.

It seemed to support accounts by Syrian military sources a day earlier who reported an explosion at what they called a rebel chemical weapons factory in Khan Sheikhoun.

Earlier, the US and other powers had blamed the Syrian government.

Footage from the scene showed civilians, many of them children, choking and foaming at the mouth.

Witnesses said clinics treating the injured were then targeted by air strikes.

UK-based monitoring group the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights put the death toll at 72, including 20 children.

It was unable to say which chemical had been involved but pro-opposition groups said it was believed to have been the nerve agent Sarin.

‘War crime’

The attack will overshadow a conference in Brussels at which 70 donor nations will discuss aid efforts in Syria. Delegates want to step up humanitarian access for thousands of civilians trapped by fighting.

Syria’s civil war has raged for more than six years, with no political solution in sight.

Nearly five million Syrians have fled the country and more than six million are internally displaced, the UN says. More than 250,000 people have been killed.

Media captionVictims were treated for injuries, including asphyxiation

Wednesday’s emergency meeting of the UN Security Council was called by France and the UK as international outrage mounted over the attack.

Britain’s ambassador to the UN, Matthew Rycroft, said the incident was “very bad news for peace in Syria”.

“This is clearly a war crime and I call on the Security Council members who have previously used their vetoes to defend the indefensible to change their course,” he told reporters in New York.

  • The spectre of nerve agents in Syria – again
  • US blames Assad over ‘chemical attack’
  • Aftermath of attack in pictures (Warning graphic images)
  • Why is there a war in Syria?

In a statement, US President Donald Trump condemned what he called “these heinous actions” by the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson accused the Syrian government of “brutal, unabashed barbarism”.

UN Syria envoy Staffan de Mistura said it was a “horrific” attack and that there should be a “clear identification of responsibilities and accountability” for it.


Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image captionWitnesses said clinics treating the wounded were subject to air strikes

The BBC’s Lyse Doucet in Brussels says the attack could prove a stumbling block at Wednesday’s international conference.

The EU hopes to use the prospect of funds for reconstruction as a bargaining chip in the faltering peace talks, our correspondent says, but the latest developments will deepen the opposition of those who say now is not the time to discuss financial support for areas controlled by the Syrian government.

[“Source-bbc”]

Police launch murder investigation after death of Paul McCready

Police have launched a murder investigation following the death of 31 year old Paul McCready in Belfast city centre.

Police have launched a murder investigation following the death of 31 year old Paul McCready in Belfast city centre.

Police have named the murder victim who died after an altercation in Belfast city centre as 31-year-old Paul McCready.

Mr McCready from north Belfast was injured in the incident near the Northern Whig bar in the Donegall Street area at around 12.50am on Sunday.

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Police officers at the scene of a murder in Belfast City Centre following an altercation close to the Northern Whig on April 2nd 2017 (Photo - Kevin Scott / Belfast Telegraph)
Police officers at the scene of a murder in Belfast City Centre following an altercation close to the Northern Whig on April 2nd 2017 (Photo – Kevin Scott / Belfast Telegraph)

A 30-year-old man who was arrested at the scene remains in custody.

Detective Chief Inspector Geoffrey Boyce is continuing to appeal for witnesses.

“We know that a large number of people were in the vicinity of the Donegall Street/Waring Street junction at around the time the altercation took place,” he said.

“I would appeal to those people who have not yet gotten in touch with the investigation team to please do so. We are keen to gather as much information as possible about the circumstances and events that occurred here early this morning.”

Sinn Fein MLA for North Belfast Caral Ni Chuilin passed on her condolences to the family.

“The death of a 31-year-old man following an altercation close to Donegall Street in Belfast city centre has shocked local people,” she said.

“My thoughts and sympathies are with the family of this man at this time.

“I would appeal for anyone with information on this incident to come forward and contact the police.”

Online Editors

[“Source-belfasttelegraph”]