Kaalakaandi Box Office Collection Day 1: Saif Ali Khan’s Film Gets A ‘Slow Start,’ Collects…

Kaalakaandi Box Office Collection Day 1: Saif Ali Khan's Film Gets A 'Slow Start,' Collects...

Box Office: Kaalakaandi: Saif Ali Khan in the film. (Image courtesy: Kaalakaandi Film)

NEW DELHI: 

HIGHLIGHTS

  1. Kaalakaandi features Saif Ali Khan in the lead role
  2. The film grosses Rs. One crore
  3. The film also stars Deepak Dobriyal

Saif Ali Khan’s latest release Kaalakaandi, which opened to positive reviews on Friday, has ‘grossed one crore net’ at the box office on Day 1, Box Office India reported. The film stars Saif Ali Khan as the protagonist, who has been diagnosed with stomach cancer. Saif’s character does not have much time in hand and he realises that he should make the most of the remaining days. Box Office India also reports that because the film is set in the backdrop of Mumbai, it has performed a little better in Mumbai and Pune as compared to other cities. Earlier, of Kaalakaandi, film distributor Akshaye Rathi told Indian Express that the film will perhaps manage a score of Rs.1.5 crores on opening day and that the first weekend collections will be limited to single figures.

Kaalakaandi released at the box office with Anurag Kashyap’s Mukkabaaz and Zareen Khan’s 1921.

1921 was the best out of the three films with collections set to be in the 1.50 crore net range, reported Box Office India while Mukkabaaz had the lowest number with around 75  lakhs net.

In his review for NDTV, film critic Saibal Chatterjee gave Saif’s film 3 stars out of 5. “For cinema trivia geeks, Kaalakaandi is strewn with interesting takeaways. The principal protagonist (Saif Ali Khan), who like the conscientious but dull bureaucrat Watanabe in the Akira Kurosawa classic Ikiru, is diagnosed with stomach cancer and given only a few months to live. The multiple tales unfold in parallel arcs. It is only in the penultimate scenes and a zany final shot that the plot connects a few of the characters but only in a tenuous manner. Kaalakaandi takes a while to warm up but when it does it sets a lively pace, especially in the second half,” he wrote.

Apart from Saif Ali Khan, Kaalakaandi also stars actors like Deepak Dobriyal, Vijay Raaz and Kunaal Roy Kapur.

[“Source-ndtv”]

Microwaves For 243 Bihar Lawmakers. ‘it’s simplest 30 Lakhs,’ Says Minister

each authorities branch in Bihar palms out presents to the country‘s MLAs within the financesconsultation to thank them for doing their job.
PATNA:
HIGHLIGHTS
Departments hand out items to MLAs on every day of the finances session
Bihar MLAs offered with microwaves, suitcases and mobile phones
A way of showing admire to us, nothing wrong with it, say Bihar MLAs
Friday turned into a specially satisfied workday for Bihar’s 243 legislators. each of them turned into gifteda microwave oven via the kingdom‘s schooling branch. On other days of the continued financesconsultation they’ve received suitcases and cellular phones.

For about two a long time now, each government branch arms out presents to the kingdom‘s MLAsinside the price range session to thank them for doing their taskraising questions in the residence in public hobby. The intent supplied for the startling way of life is that their contribution through the yrenables departments decide which regions need attention whilst the kingdom‘s price range is beingprepared.

After the budget is supplied, the thanksgiving starts; each branch arms out its presents on a one of a kind day.

On different days of the continued finances session, the legislators have received suitcases and cellularphones.
The microwave ovens handed out today value Bihar’s schooling branch Rs. 11,125 each. “it is just acount number of approximately 30 lakh rupees. Please do not hype it up like this. it is unfair to comparethis to different problems like salaries, situation of faculties…Our MLAs need to journey to their constituencies to check out mid-day food. So once they pass, they can take the microwave oven with themand heat food and eat,” stated training minister Ashok Chowdhary.

“This has been occurring for ages, not anything new on this. we’ve got subsidiaries within the branchwhich might be profitable, they’re the ones that provide those items,” Mr Chowdhury stated.

leader Minister Nitish Kumar offered no comment, but his deputy and Tejaswi Yadav, 25, of the RJD admonished, “Bihar is a negative nation. The individuals who get elected here are not crorepatis but poorhuman beings. what’s so wrong in the event that they get a few presents? Please do not rake up suchproblems.”

assets near senior BJP leader Sushil Modi, a former Deputy chief Minister, said he had suggested aamendment a few years in the past – “all departments need to club their gifts and hand out simply one.”

The proposal became struck down with uncommon unanimity amongst Bihar’s politicians.

Global Majority Backs a Ban on ‘Dark Net,’ Poll Says

Global Majority Backs a Ban on 'Dark Net,' Poll Says

Seven in 10 people say the “dark net” – an anonymous online home to both criminals and activists fearful of government surveillance – should be shut down, according to a global Ipsos poll released on Tuesday.

The findings, from a poll of at least 1,000 people in each of 24 countries, come as policymakers and technology companies argue over whether digital privacy should be curbed to help regulators and law enforcement more easily thwart hackers and other digital threats.

The US Justice Department is currently trying to force Apple Inc to write software to allow access to an iPhone used by San Bernardino, California shooter Rizwan Farook.

The dark net refers to an area of the Internet only accessible via special web browsers that ensure anonymity, where content is hidden and data typically encrypted.

The Ipsos poll was commissioned the Waterloo, Ontario-based Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI). The think tank is part of a commission seeking to shape Internet governance.

The question asked in the poll pointed out the dark net’s anonymity can protect journalists, human rights activists, dissidents and whistleblowers, but also hide child abuse networks and illegal marketplaces selling weapons and narcotics.

The portion of respondents who either strongly agreed or somewhat agreed it should be shuttered ranged between 61 percent and 85 percent, with support strongest in Indonesia, India, Egypt and Mexico and weakest in Sweden, South Korea and Kenya.

Other countries polled included Pakistan, Australia, the United States, France, Germany, Turkey, and Tunisia.

“The public clearly wants law enforcement to have the tools to do its job. But if you flip it around and say should they have access to your data they tend to feel differently,” said Fen Osler Hampson, director of the global security and politics program at CIGI.

Only 38 percent of all respondents said they trust that their online activities are not monitored.

Hampson said public concern about online privacy will likely grow as more and more cars, appliances and infrastructure connect to online networks.

Ipsos said the poll was accurate in each country to within plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.

© Thomson Reuters 2016

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Tags: Dark net, Internet
[“source-Gadgets”]

‘Worst Serial Killer In History,’ Who Fed Prostitutes To Pigs, Sparks Rage By Publishing Book

'Worst Serial Killer In History,' Who Fed Prostitutes To Pigs, Sparks Rage By Publishing Book

The pig farmer mainly preyed upon drug addicts and prostitutes, picking them up in Vancouver’s red light districts. (Representational Image)

Robert Pickton sat in a Vancouver jail cell and lamented that his quest to kill 50 women had come up just short.

“I made my own grave by being sloppy. Doesn’t that just kick you in the ass now,” Pickton told his cellmate, adding that authorities were planning on charging him with murdering 49 women. “I was just gonna [expletive] do one more, make it even.”

That 2002 confession was captured on video (his cellmate was actually an undercover cop), and it would play a role in Pickton’s conviction for killing six women, for which he was sentenced to life in prison.

In a book published 14 years later, however, Pickton now claims that he is innocent: “the fall guy” for a bungled investigation.

“The [Royal Canadian Mounted Police] were desperately failing to do their job properly, while looking for someone to take the fall, which is truly evil,” Pickton writes in the book, “Pickton: In His Own Words,” according to CTV News Vancouver.

The book, which was reportedly smuggled out of prison, has drawn instant and intense outrage from the families of Pickton’s alleged victims.

“It really disgusts me knowing that the worst serial killer in history has the nerve to write that book and reopen wounds,” Sandra Gagnon, whose sister Janet Henry used to go to Pickton’s farm and went missing in 1997, told CBC.

“He’s taunting us – the victims’ families,” added Ricky Papin, the brother of another woman slain by Pickton, in an interview with Global News. “Yeah, there’s no question, he’s taunting us.”

Within hours, a petition calling on Amazon to stop selling the book amassed more than 50,000 signatures. The company pulled the book from its website, although at least one other major online bookseller continued to sell the book as of Tuesday morning.

The controversy has caused a California man and a Colorado company involved in the book’s publication to issue apologies for promoting the serial killer’s 144-page self-defense.

“Outskirts Press apologizes to the families of the victims for any additional heartache this may have caused,” said a statement from a Colorado company that helps authors self-publish their books, according to the Associated Press.

“If I had to do it all over again, I would say ‘no,'” added Michael Chilldres, a California man whose name appears on the front of the book and who said he helped publish it as a favor to a friend locked up with Pickton.

“I didn’t think this book was going to be as big of a deal as it is,” he told the National Post. “I just thought it would be a little deal.”

If the book is a big deal, then it’s because Pickton is considered to be perhaps Canada’s most heinous criminal. Friends testified that he bragged about killing scores of women and feeding their corpses to the pigs he kept on his farm in an attempt to hide the evidence.

In his jailhouse confession, Pickton said he was “a bad dude” and that he had also used a meat rendering plant to hide evidence of his crimes.

“I wanted one more to make the big five-o,” he told the undercover officer, adding that the prosecutors’ list of 49 alleged victims only had “half” the real number.

Pickton bragged of being “bigger than the ones in the States,” he added, in an apparent reference to either John Wayne Gacy or Ted Bundy. “His record was about 42.”

The pig farmer mainly preyed upon drug addicts and prostitutes, picking them up in Vancouver’s red light districts before driving them to his farm, where he had sex with them before murdering them in a variety of horrific ways, prosecutors claimed.

“I filled the syringes up with antifreeze and you inject the stuff and you’re dead in about five to ten minutes,” he told the undercover cop. He allegedly handcuffed and stabbed other victims, including one woman who managed to escape, naked and bleeding, in 1997 after stabbing Pickton with his own knife.

That woman was considered unreliable by police, however, and Pickton was not prosecuted. It would be another half decade before his arrest.

When he was finally arrested in February of 2002, it was almost by chance. Investigators had raided his pig farm looking for illicit weapons, only to find items belonging to long-missing women.

A search of Pickton’s farm revealed DNA evidence of 26 missing women, and the pig farmer was charged with their murders.

During a high-profile trial, both Vancouver Police and the Mounties were accused of missing many chances to stop Pickton’s decades-long murder spree. They even trailed him to the meat rendering plant where he allegedly disposed the bodies, but never stopped him to check what he had in his truck.

Workers at the plant didn’t suspect anything, either. Robert Bayers, the plant’s foreman, testified to seeing Pickton drop off between five and ten loads at the plant, but didn’t see exactly what he was dumping.

“It was just another guy dumping stuff in our pit,” Bayers said in court, according to the Globe and Mail. But Bayers was put off by the filthy man.

“He was handling these old dirty barrels, just with his bare hands, and it was so gross-looking,” Bayers said. “We work in the rendering industry, and it’s, you know, dead animals, right? It’s not a very pretty thing to be working with your bare hands.”

When he offered Pickton gloves, the man refused.

“He was such a dirty guy,” Bayers testified. “He was gross-lookin’, actually. I kind of felt sorry for him.”

Pickton’s method of disposing of his victims’ bodies, either at the plant or by feeding them to his pigs, frustrated investigators, who had been fielding tips about Pickton since 1971.

Lori Shenher, a Vancouver Police officer assigned to investigate women’s disappearances in 1998, received a tip about Pickton on her second day on the job in 1998.

“I was mindful we were not finding bodies. We were not finding bodies because we’re dealing with someone who had the ability to dispose of them,” she later testified, according to the Star. “When I heard grinders, I thought ‘bingo, this is the kind of guy we’re looking for.'”

But Shenher said that even after interviewing the woman who escaped from Pickton in 1997, she couldn’t get her superiors to sign off on arresting the pig farmer.

When Pickton was finally picked up in 2002, Shenher didn’t feel relief. She felt sick.

“I had people coming up to me in the couple of days, weeks after his arrest, saying ‘Oh, wasn’t that your guy? That’s your guy!’ and every time I heard that I just about threw up,” Shenher told CBC’s The Current.

The Vancouver Police Department later admitted that “there were mistakes made and we could have caught Pickton earlier.”

Despite a mountain of DNA evidence against Pickton, his trial was far from open and shut. Although initially charged with 26 counts of first-degree murder, he was convicted of only six counts of second-degree murder. Twenty other charges were later stayed.

Families of Pickton’s other alleged victims were left frustrated that their loved ones had not received justice. Many felt that the victims’ race — some of the murdered women were Native American — drug problems or sex work had again worked against the women.

“I have a friend that went to them [police] in ’98 and told them about the [Pickton] farm,” said CBC’s Audrey Huntley. “They said that she was a ‘junkie ho’.” And they ignored her testimony about the missing native women.”

Now many of those families feel re-victimized by Pickton’s book.

“Rambling” and “interspersed with passages from the Bible,” the book claims that Pickton was set-up by investigators without offering any hint at who might have killed the 26 women or why their DNA was found at the farm, according to CBC.

After family members expressed disgust over the book, which was reportedly offered for sale on Amazon’s Canadian website, officials said they had reached out to the retailer.

“We are taking this very seriously and investigating every means available to ensure that the families involved are protected from further harm and that Robert Pickton will not profit in any way from this book,” said Mike Morris, Minister of Public Safety for British Columbia.

Unlike other Canadian provinces and many American states, British Columbia does not have a law banning convicts from making money by recounting their crimes. After Monday’s events, however, B.C. is now considering such a law, often referred to as “Son of Sam” laws after the infamous New York City serial killer.

Canadian officials are now investigating how, exactly, the book manuscript was smuggled out of the prison where Pickton is being kept.

According to Chilldres, it was another inmate who sent him the pages. Chilldres agreed to publish them as a favor to his friend, a convicted child molester who now shares a cell with Pickton, according to the National Post.

“I’m not sure how he did it, but I got it in the mail,” Chilldres, a pilot and the retired owner of a glass repair shop, told the newspaper. Chilldres said it took about one year and cost $2,500 to publish the book, which features his name prominently on the cover.

“I just published a book!” he posted on his Facebook page on Sunday.

Then came the backlash.

Chilldres admitted, however, that he wasn’t ignorant of Pickton’s identity before publishing the controversial book.

“I got on Wikipedia and looked up his arrest record and stuff, and he was kind of creepy,” he said. But he also hinted that he thought the convicted serial killer might really be innocent, as the book argues.

“If Pickton did it, then he needs to rot in hell and I feel real sorry for the victims and the families,” Chilldres told the National Post. “But if he didn’t do it, then who did do it?”

Chilldres said he hoped to at least recoup his $2,500 from the book’s publication but said none of the money would go to Pickton. Instead, 10 percent would go to an undetermined charity and the rest would go towards the legal defense of his friend, the convicted child molester.

The California man said he hoped Pickton’s victims would not “hold it against me” and that he was “sorry I had to bring it up.”

But he also said he has plans to translate the book into French and Spanish.

As of Tuesday morning, the book was still for sale on Barnes & Noble, but it wasn’t well reviewed.

“Barnes and Noble you need to take this down,” wrote one reviewer. “This is a hurtful and illegally smuggled book. Get it off your site.”

“You will not find any ‘Whys’ in this incoherent, illiterate ranting,” wrote another reviewer. “It is tedious and boring drivel filled with tirades against the police, asinine theories about the Hell’s Angels, and a consistent poor me theme.

“Absolutely no revelations here. Don’t waste your money,” the one-star review continued. “This book has no literary merit, in fact, it has no social merit either. It is not literature, it is not revelatory of the criminal mind, it is not relevant. There is absolutely nothing it has to offer the world.”

[“source-ndtv”]