This is the most Instagrammed place in the world

The happiest place on Earth is also the most highly Instagrammed place on Earth.

Pics or it didn’t happen! The list of the world’s most Instagrammed places is out, providing a pretty clear vista on the places most people are traveling to, or the places most worthy of a #gram.

Of the top 20 most Instagrammed places worldwide, 12 are in the United States, according to a study by TravelBird. France and Germany tie for second, with each home to two different places showing up on the “Top 20 Most Instagrammed Places” list.

Instagram, a unit of Facebook FB, -0.13%  , announced at the end of April that it had doubled its user base to 700 million monthly active users in two years; 88.48 million of those users are from the United States, while Russia comes in second place, providing 27.52 million members of the Instagram user base.

This list, of course, might also be viewed as an indicator of where narcissists are traveling. According to a survey of 3,700 college students by LendEdu, 64% of millennials say Instagram is the most narcissistic social-media platform.

“With just a few filters, a little saturation, and a clever caption, social media can make even the most average Joe look like an esteemed socialite,” the LendEdu study noted. “They use these platforms to boast of their daily tidings, carefully craft their public image, and feed their egos in this interconnected digital age.”

The list ranges from the historic, including, in Paris, the Eiffel Tower and Notre-Dame, to the adventurous, with national parks and lush beaches. Of course, Disney’s DIS, -2.15% theme parks make multiple appearances on the list.

Here are the 20 most Instagrammed places in the world:

20. Empire State Building in New York City

Number of Instagram tags: 1,536,186

19. Myrtle Beach in South Carolina

Number of Instagram tags: 1,602,759

18. Yosemite National Park in California

Number of Instagram tags: 1,733,680

17. The Colosseum in Rome

Number of Instagram tags: 1,752,045

16. Burj Khalifa in Dubai

Number of Instagram tags: 1,808,173

15. Waikiki, Hawaii

Number of Instagram tags: 1,939,768

14. The Grand Canyon

Number of Instagram tags: 1,989,316

13. Valle Sagrado (Machu Picchu) in Peru

Number of Instagram tags: 2,195,108

12. Niagara Falls

Number of Instagram tags: 2,198,459

11. Mardi Gras in New Orleans

Number of Instagram tags: 2,202,256

10. Oktoberfest in Bavaria

Number of Instagram tags: 2,262,885

9. Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris

Number of Instagram tags: 2,517,129

8. Times Square in Manhattan

Number of Instagram tags: 2,517,129

7. Big Ben in London

Number of Instagram tags: 2,561,617

6. Las Vegas Strip, Nevada, USA

Number of Instagram tags: 3,653,548

5. Berlin Wal in Germany

Number of Instagram tags: 4,595,501

4. South Beach in Miami

Number of Instagram tags: 4,689,396

3. Walt Disney World in Florida

Number of Instagram tags: 5,465,098

2. Eiffel Tower in Paris

Number of Instagram tags: 7,253,011

1. Disneyland in California

Number of Instagram tags: 14,615,952

Obama traveled the world. Trump goes to Florida.

Donald Trump has evinced a notable lack of curiosity about many aspects of the job he claimed to want. One that stands out — and that is particularly galling for the supposed leader of the free world, and in stark contrast to President Obama — is a disinclination thus far to travel outside the country’s borders.

It was clear early on in the presidential campaign that Donald Trump was more interested in winning the election than in actually doing the daily work involved with the job, as the laughably thin list of his so-called “historic accomplishments” during his first 100 days shows.

He has demonstrated his mental laziness and utter lack of curiosity in understanding of the world time and time again.

From his shifting positions on NATO, to needing a history lesson from the president of China on the subject of North Korea, to his varied inappropriate behavior toward the prime minister of Australia, the prime minister of Japan, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel — who also had to give Trump a schooling on his supposedly signature issue of trade — Trump has proven that it is a markedly small world in which he lives.

And not just metaphorically.

When Obama took office, he immediately faced the task of improving the United States’ standing around the world, after the damage done on a global scale by the George W. Bush administration. And Obama took that job seriously, logging thousands of miles within the first 100 days after his inauguration in 2009.

And the public’s admiration at that time for Obama’s efforts outpaces current opinion on Trump’s ability to do the same by a vast margin, according to a recent Gallup poll:

According to the poll, only 29 percent of Americans believe “leaders of foreign countries around the world have respect for the President.” That is less than half of the 67 percent of people who believed Obama was respected by foreign leaders at this point in his presidency, and it even trails the 49 percent who believed this of George W. Bush.

Considering his embarrassing encounters with many world leaders thus far, and his clear preference for authoritarians and dictators, it is difficult to say whether Trump traveling to other countries would actually be helpful.

But it is supposed to be part of the job of president of the United States. Instead, Trump seems content to merely occupy the role, rather than embody it.

Trump spends much of his time — and taxpayer dollars — traveling to his resort in Florida. And he will occasionally travel to other states when he has the chance to grandiosely pat himself on the back, however unearned the personal kudos may be.

But there is a whole world out there with which the United States president ought to be thoughtfully engaged. Obama understood this well. But Trump? He surely has a tee time to meet.

[“Source-shareblue”]

Inside the World’s First All-Female Special Forces Unit Norway’s Jegertroppen

Image result for Inside the World’s First All-Female Special Forces Unit: Norway’s Jegertroppen

An explosion just a few feet away rocks the unmarked station wagon as it travels along a dirt road in the Norwegian woodland.

Immediately, two soldiers jump from their front seats and run for cover behind the carcass of an old, rusty tank. Firing their weapons at targets along the snow-covered hillside, they call for support from the rest of their unit.

This firefight is just a drill, but the soldiers taking part are battling to break down one of the final barriers to women serving in the armed forces. They are training to become part of Norway’s Jegertroppen or “Hunter Troops” — the world’s first all-female military special forces unit.

More than a year after the U.S. Department of Defense repealed a longtime ban on women serving in ground combat assignments, relatively few have been trained or assigned to these jobs in the U.S. military.

Norway has moved a lot faster to break down military gender barriers. Its parliament introduced legislation in the 1980s that opened up all military roles to women. Last year, Norway became the first NATO country to introduce female conscription.

But the introduction of the all-female special forces unit in 2014 raised the profile of women in the Norwegian military the most.

The unit was started after Norway’s Armed Forces’ Special Command saw an increased need for female special operations soldiers — particularly in places like Afghanistan where male troops were forbidden from communicating with women. The exclusion of half the population was having a detrimental impact on intelligence gathering and building community relations.

Image: A soldier rests after military training exercise at the Terningmoen Camp in Elverum, Norway

“When [Norway] deployed to Afghanistan we saw that we needed female soldiers. Both as female advisers for the Afghan special police unit that we mentored, but also when we did an arrest,” said Col. Frode Kristofferson, the commander of Norway’s special forces. “We needed female soldiers to take care of the women and children in the buildings that we searched.”

So they created the all-female unit specifically designed to train them.

“One of the advantages that we see with an all-female unit is that we can have a tailored program and a tailored selection for the female operators,” Kristofferson said, adding that at the end of the one-year program the female soldiers are just as capable as their male counterparts.

One of the unit’s members, 22-year-old Tonje, said the unit is proof that women can do the same job as men, even in the male-dominated world of the military.

“We’re carrying the same weight in the backpack as the boys,” said Tonje, who did not provide her full name due to the unit’s rules. “We do the same tasks.”

Those tasks at Terningmoen Camp, about 100 miles north of Oslo, include parachuting out of military aircraft, skiing in the Arctic tundra, navigating the wilderness and fighting in urban terrain.

She added that the weapon, backpack and other gear she carries on long marches, weighs over 100 pounds.

“I’m the smallest, so I carry as much weight as I myself weigh,” she said.

[Source:- NBC]

Andy Murray admits paying price of battle to reach world No1

Andy Murray practises in Monte Carlo yesterday in preparation for his return from an elbow injury.

Andy Murray practises in Monte Carlo yesterday in preparation for his return from an elbow injury. Photograph: fotopress/Getty Images

In the yin and yang of the sporting world, Andy Murray returns to action at the Monte Carlo Masters this week admitting that the effort of ending last year as world No1, for the first time in his career, may well have contributed to his stop-start beginning to the 2017 season. Having returned home after an early exit at the Australian Open to find he had shingles, he then picked up an elbow injury at Indian Wells, which caused him to miss the Miami Masters and Britain’s Davis Cup quarter‑final defeat in France.

From the start of the Rome Masters in May last year, Murray won 61 of his 65 matches, during which time he won Wimbledon for the second time, claimed a second Olympic singles gold and his last five events of the year to overtake Novak Djokovic at the top of the rankings. With the calendar so crowded, it was always possible that it would come back to bite him, one way or the other.

“It’s definitely a possibility,” said Murray, who lost in the fourth round at the Australian Open, won the Dubai title but then went out in his first match at Indian Wells before getting injured. “I think the elbow injury was nothing to do with what happened. The shingles would have been more likely something to do with that but I feel fine now. I got ill in Miami and had some tests when I got back and everything was completely normal and I feel great.”

It was an injury that even on Sunday, as he chatted at the picturesque Monte Carlo Country Club, he struggled to explain fully, expressing doubt over the amateur diagnosis of a tear given in Miami last month by his brother Jamie. “I had it re-scanned when I got home about a week, 10 days after, when the inflammation had died down, and compared it with the scan I had on my elbow in 2014,” he said. “It looked fairly similar. So not sure if it was a tear there or not.”

The good news is the world No1 is here, sounding confident and insisting he would not be playing if he felt there was even the slightest chance of exacerbating the elbow problem, an injury which had affected him only when serving. “I wouldn’t play if I felt like I was risking it. In practice I’ve been serving a lot. I only really started serving properly, as hard as I would hope to in a match, two days ago [but] I will have had five days before my match of serving at the right speed. I think it will be fine.”

Murray reached the semi-finals here last year, the start of his most successful clay-court season – winning in Rome, finishing runner-up in Madrid and then again at Roland Garros. He leads Djokovic by 3,695 points at the top of the world rankings but with Roger Federer having won the Australian Open, Indian Wells and Miami, Murray knows he will need to start picking up points if he is to hold on to top spot later in the year. “Obviously I have some work to do to push myself back up in the [calendar-year] rankings again this year. That starts this week.”

Murray starts his campaign on Wednesday against either Gilles Müller, the world No28, or the Spaniard Tommy Robredo. Djokovic, back from an elbow injury of his own, and Rafael Nadal, are in the other half of the draw. Nadal will meet the winner of today’s all-British battle between Kyle Edmund and Dan Evans.

[“Source-theguardian.”]