How to Download and Manually Install Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow on Nexus Devices

How to Download and Manually Install Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow on Nexus DevicesThe first major update to Android 6.0 Marshmallow has begun rolling out to Nexus and Android One devices. If you are the impatient kind who wants to download the update immediately, then you can do it manually. Google has released Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow factory images for various devices in its Nexus range.

We’ve listed the new features in Android 6.0.1 and if you have one of the eligible devices, you will get an OTA update soon. The following devices will get Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow.

There are several risks involved with manually downloading and installing Android factory images. You could lose all of your data and the process is pretty complex that’s best avoided if you are new to this kind of a thing.

(Also see: Best Android 6.0 Marshmallow Features)

Android 6.0 Marshmallow is currently available for the following devices – Google Nexus 5, Google Nexus 6, Google Nexus 7 2013, Google Nexus 9, Google Nexus Player, Google Nexus 6P, and Google Nexus 5X. Here’s how to manually install Android 6.0 Marshmallow on these devices.

1) Download and install the latest Android Studio Preview on your Windows computer. This installs the ADB and Fastboot programmes, which can be accessed through the command terminal on your PC.

2) Add the SDK folder to the PATH by following these steps:

3) Right click My Computer and click on Properties.

4) Click on Advanced System Settings.

5) Click on System Properties > Advanced > Environment Variables.

6) In the Window, select Path, then click on Edit, and then type in the name of the directory where you installed the SDK, and remember that each entry is separated by a semi-colon.

7) Enable USB debugging on your device. First, go to Settings > About Phone > Software information.

8) Tap Build number seven times.

9) Go to Settings > Developer options. Tick USB debugging.

10) Download the correct factory image for your device.

Android 6.0.1 for Nexus 5

Android 6.0.1 for Nexus 6

Android 6.0.1 for Nexus 7 2013 Wi-Fi

Android 6.0.1 for Nexus 7 2013 Mobile

Android 6.0.1 for Nexus 9 Wi-Fi

Android 6.0.1 for Nexus 9 LTE

Android 6.0.1 for Nexus Player

Android 6.0.1 for Nexus 6P

Android 6.0.1 for Nexus 5X

11) Extract the image on your computer. This should give you a tar file. Extract it again.

12) Connect your device to your computer over USB.

13) Start the device in fastboot mode.

The easiest way to do this is to hold a key combination while powering up the device. For Nexus 5, hold the volume up, volume down and power buttons while powering on the device. The full list of key combinations for different devices is here.

You can also boot into fastboot mode using the ADB tool: With the device powered on, go to the command terminal and execute the following: adb reboot bootloader

If needed, unlock the device’s bootloader through your computer using the command terminal and executing: fastboot oem unlock

1) Open a command terminal and navigate to the unzipped system image directory.

2) Execute flash-all.bat, which was a part of the unzipped image file. This script installs the necessary bootloader, baseband firmware(s), and operating system. For this to work, you need to have added the folder where ADB and Fastboot are installed to the system’s path as described in step 2.

3) When this is done, Google recommends that you lock the bootloader for security. You can do that by booting the device in fastboot mode while still connected via USB, and using the command terminal to execute: fastboot oem lock.

That will install Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow on your Nexus device. For more tutorials, visit our How To section.

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Best Camera Phones Under Rs. 15,000

Best Camera Phones Under Rs. 15,000“I need a smartphone with a good camera” – this is a common phrase used by several buyers who are out for a handset in the market. The point of the matter is that the camera has become one of the most important features users need in smartphones. Increasing popularity of social platforms such as Facebook, which now has over a billion active users daily, and Instagram, a photo-sharing app which recently claimed that its user base in India doubled over the last year, have only increased the demand of an affordable smartphone with great camera.

(Also see: Smartphones Under Rs. 15,000 With Great Battery Life)

Here’s a list of smartphones in the sub-Rs. 15,000 segment which pack decent camera sensors. It’s worth noting that the selections we have made have been done on the basis of our in-depth reviews of the handsets. We’ve also restricted ourselves to recent launches.

(Also see: 10 Smartphones We Loved in 2015)

So here are the phones under Rs. 15,000 with the best camera, listed in alphabetical order.

Asus ZenFone 2 Laser
The Asus ZenFone 2 Laser (Review | Pictures) sports a 13-megapixel rear camera which is accompanied by a dual-tone flash and laser, while there is a 5-megapixel front camera on board as well. In our camera tests, we found that the rear camera performance more than any of its other features.The laser autofocus was one of the standout points of the camera and reminded us a lot about high-end devices which feature the laser autofocus system such as LG G4 and the OnePlus 2. The laser-autofocus system worked well to quickly and properly focus on objects within a reasonable close shooting sphere. It also quickly adjusts to slight movements.

asus_zenfone_2_laser_sample_shot_ndtv.jpgAsus ZenFone 2 Laser sample shot

The camera is decent in both well-lit and darker indoor settings. The colour range is good, and sharpness and detail are adequate for a sub-Rs. 15,000 phone. On shooting up close, we found that the ZenFone 2 Laser produced excellent results, capturing plenty of information quickly and accurately. It was launched at a price of Rs. 9,999.

Asus ZenFone 2 Laser (ZE550KL)

Rs. 9999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Decent looks and build
  • Quick and accurate autofocus
  • Good camera performance in closed environments
  • 4G connectivity on both SIMs
  • Great battery life
  • Bad
  • Average camera performance in open environments
  • Sub-par performance compared to its peers
Read detailed Asus ZenFone 2 Laser (ZE550KL) review
ALSO SEE
Asus Zenfone 2 Laser Ze550kl 16gb
₹ 8,999
Asus Zenfone 2 Laser ZE550KL(Black, 16 GB)
₹ 9,999
Asus Zenfone 2 Laser ZE550KL-1A121IN (Black, 16G…
₹ 13,999

InFocus M530
The InFocus M530 (Review | Pictures) sports a rear camera of 13-megapixel shooter with dual flash and optical image stabilization (OIS). In our camera tests, we found that the handset took decent images in both normal and low light, capturing accurate detail and colour. The handset however showed an over-saturation problem with whites, which appeared washed out and too bright. It’s worth noting that the problem is same as with some other cameras in this range.

One of the highlights of the InFocus M530 is it sports a 13-megapixel front sensor, with similar levels of detail and accuracy to the rear camera. Another notable addition is the presence of soft flash which helps when taking selfies in low light.

infocus_m530_sample_shot.jpgInFocus M530 sample shot

During our review, we found that the camera app on the InFocus M530 was well designed and was easy to use, with important functions such as OIS, HDR mode, flash, camera switcher and mode selection on the main camera screen itself. Autofocus was quick and accurate, as was the shutter itself. The handset was launched at Rs. 10,999.

InFocus M530

Rs. 10999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Power and performance far above its price category
  • Good rear camera
  • Among the better front cameras we’ve seen
  • Fairly customisable UI
  • Bad
  • Pathetic battery life
  • Average looks
  • Screen is too low-resolution compared to the competition
Read detailed InFocus M530 review
ALSO SEE
InFocus M260(White & Black, 8 GB)
₹ 3,990
InFocus M2
₹ 5,999
InFocus Wireless USB DisplayLink Adapter : SP-DO…
₹ 7,385

Xolo Black
The Xolo Black (Review | Pictures) sports a dual-camera setup on the rear. There is a 13-megapixel primary sensor and a 2-megapixel secondary sensor. This dual-camera setup has been meant to improve autofocus speed and allow refocusing on different parts of the image after it is taken, similar to how the HTC One (M8)’s dual-camera feature worked.

xolo_black_sample_shot_ndtv.jpgXolo Black sample shot

In our tests, we found the autofocus a bit quicker than we noticed on most other similarly priced smartphones. The refocusing feature worked well, but was still essentially a gimmick that won’t be put to use very often by most people. We found the camera on the handset to be decent, taking pictures that were sharp, detailed and fairly vibrant. The front camera was a standard 5-megapixel shooter, but interestingly had its own flash. The Xolo Black was launched at Rs. 12,999.

Xolo Black

Rs. 12999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Decently built and looks good
  • Hive UI has plenty of customisation options
  • Good cameras, front camera has flash
  • Straightforward, reliable performance
  • Bad
  • Hive UI can be sluggish at times
  • Screen isn’t quite up to the mark for full-HD
  • Notification light in the power switch makes no sense
  • Two separate camera apps make shooting a complicated affair
Read detailed Xolo Black review
ALSO SEE
Xolo Q900s Black : WINQ900S
₹ 5,299
Xolo Xolo 8gb Deep Black
₹ 6,999
XOLO Q1011(Black, 4 GB)
₹ 7,999

Yu Yureka Plus
One of the biggest upgrades in the Yu Yureka Plus (Review) from its predecessor was it used newer IMX214 sensor camera module. In our review, we found that the 13-megapixel sensor clicked detailed and sharp images. The colours in the images were vibrant and truly popped. During our review, we had to zoom really far in on our desktop monitor to reveal any flaws in the images, and whites had the proper colour tone.

yu_yureka_plus_sample_shot_ndtv.jpgYu Yureka Plus sample shot

The smartphone however couldn’t handle low-light situations, with dark zones in images appearing too dark to be able to spot any detail. HDR mode offered excellent results. The 5-megapixel front camera took acceptable shots although it suffered from the same tendency to underperform with low-light shots. Micromax’s Yu Yureka Plus was launched at Rs. 9,999.

Yu Yureka Plus

Rs. 9999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Improved display and camera
  • Great performance
  • Customisable Cyanogen OS
  • Excellent value for money
  • Bad
  • Nothing significant considering the price
Read detailed Yu Yureka Plus review
ALSO SEE
Yu Yureka-plus 16gb White
₹ 10,924
YU Yureka Plus on Android (Alabaster White) : YU…
₹ 11,098
Yu Yureka Plus(Moon Dust Grey, 16 GB)
₹ 11,489

Bonus pick: If you could spend a little bit extra to get a better camera.

Lenovo Vibe S1
The Lenovo Vibe S1 (Review | Pictures) sports a 13-megapixel camera with dual-tone LED flash with a dual-camera setup in the front. The main front camera included an 8-megapixel sensor, and was supported by a second 2-megapixel sensor which detected depth-of-field.

We found the camera app to be excellent, with plenty of controls and features in place during our review. The dual-camera effects on the Lenovo Vibe S1 were simple, but interesting. Capturing depth-of-field information allows the camera to detect foreground and background data, thereby accurately sensing what part of the selfie is you, and what part is the background.

lenovo_vibe_s1_sample_shot_ndtv.jpgLenovo Vibe S1 sample shot

You can also superimpose graphics in the background, or previous pictures you’ve taken. This makes for some rather interesting selfies, and makes the Vibe S1 a rather fun device for selfie lovers. The 13-megapixel rear camera was great as well, and was capable of taking crisp, accurate shots in all lighting conditions. The Lenovo Vibe S1 was launched at Rs. 15,999.

Lenovo Vibe S1

Rs. 15999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Great design and build quality
  • Good display
  • Good cameras with interesting features
  • Decent performance
  • Bad
  • Software could use some improvement
  • Non-backlit capacitive keys
  • Average battery life
  • Hybrid SIM slot
Read detailed Lenovo Vibe S1 review
ALSO SEE
Lenovo VIBE P1m(White, 16 GB)
₹ 7,999
Lenovo Vibe X2-AP (Gold) : Vibe X2
₹ 10,590
Lenovo Vibe S1 (White, 32GB) : Vibe S1
₹ 14,999

Which one of these is the best camera phone for you? If you’ve used any of these, leave a comment to tell us about your experience with the phone’s camera.

[“Source-Gadgets”]

Smartphones Under Rs. 15,000 With Great Battery Life

Smartphones Under Rs. 15,000 With Great Battery LifeA key specification that most customers look for in a smartphone nowadays is its battery capacity, and for how long it can run before shutting off. With power requirements becoming more and more demanding, companies are having to stuff massive batteries into their smartphones to stay ahead of the competition.

(Also see: Best Camera Phones Under Rs. 15,000)

This year, we saw several battery-focused smartphones launched in India, and here’s a list of some of the best under Rs. 15,000 – based on our in-depth reviews. While a large battery capacity does hint at good battery life, it is not always the case, as several factors affect a smartphone’s power consumption, from display type and resolution to the baseband radio and software optimisation.

(Also see: 10 Smartphones We Loved in 2015)

Thus, while certain specifications may appear good on paper, they may not necessarily translate into a smartphone with great battery life. Here we list smartphones we’ve put through our rigorous testing processes and have emerged at the top of the battery charts in no particular order.

Asus ZenFone 2 Laser (ZE550KL)
The Asus ZenFone 2 Laser (ZE550KL) was launched in August this year and packs a replaceable 3000mAh battery under the hood. In our review, the smartphone performed well and ran for almost 14 hours in our video loop test. The large 3000mAh battery is certainly a contributor to this, and the rest of it can be put down to specifications that work efficiently with the system. With regular usage, the Laser can deliver over a day of battery life on a single charge. The smartphone can be purchased at Rs. 9,999.

Asus ZenFone 2 Laser (ZE550KL)

Rs. 9999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Decent looks and build
  • Quick and accurate autofocus
  • Good camera performance in closed environments
  • 4G connectivity on both SIMs
  • Great battery life
  • Bad
  • Average camera performance in open environments
  • Sub-par performance compared to its peers
Read detailed Asus ZenFone 2 Laser (ZE550KL) review

Coolpad Dazen 1
The Coolpad Dazen 1 that entered India in May this year is a low-cost workhorse featuring a 2500mAh battery, which is also one of the standout features of the smartphone. Receiving 8/10 under battery performance, the Dazen 1 lasted an impressive 12 hours, 19 minutes in our review video loop test. When used moderately for daily work, this phone should last well into a second day on a single charge. Launched at Rs. 6,999, the smartphone can now be purchased from e-commerce websites for as low as Rs. 5,999.

Coolpad Dazen 1

Rs. 6999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Great battery life
  • Good camera
  • LTE support
  • Excellent value for money
  • Bad
  • A bit bulky and heavy
  • Software could use further polish
Read detailed Coolpad Dazen 1 review

Acer Liquid Z630s
The Acer Liquid Z630s with a 4000mAh battery was launched in October this year and is comparatively new in the market. The smartphone delivers enough juice to go for the whole day. The phone lasted about a day and a half with a bit of calls, gaming and video playback during our review. The smartphone managed to last 13 hours and 12 minutes in our video loop test, which is quite good. The handset is priced at Rs. 10,999 and can be a decent daily driver for users who are looking for battery-focused smartphones under Rs. 15,000.

Acer Liquid Z630s

Rs. 10999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Well built, good aesthetics
  • Nifty software features
  • Good performance
  • Spacious onboard storage
  • Bad
  • No TDD-LTE support
  • Battery life could have been better
  • Mono speaker is a bit weak
  • Average camera performance
Read detailed Acer Liquid Z630s review

Xiaomi Mi 4i
The Xiaomi Mi 4i is another competitor that received positive feedback for its battery capacity. Featuring a 3120mAh battery, the budget smartphone received a 8/10 rating for its battery life. While the smartphone easily lasted an entire day with moderate usage, it was even able to stretch itself until the next morning. Launched in April this year, Mi 4i came with maximum retail price of Rs. 12,999. However, it can now be bought at rates as low as Rs. 10,999 from e-commerce websites.

Xiaomi Mi 4i

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Stunning display
  • Great build quality
  • Bad
  • MIUI has its quirks
  • Camera performance could be better
Read detailed Xiaomi Mi 4i review

Panasonic Eluga Icon
The Panasonic Eluga Icon, which came to the Indian market in August this year, bears a 3500mAh battery. Currently priced at Rs. 10,990 from various online retailers, the low-cost 4G smartphone battery can easily get you through an entire day and a little bit more if you activate the power saving modes. During our video loop test, the handset delivered an impressive 10 hours and 12 minutes of battery life.

Panasonic Eluga Icon

Rs. 12990

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Good aesthetics
  • 4G compatible in India
  • Strong performance
  • Bad
  • Sub-par camera performance
  • Older version of Android
Read detailed Panasonic Eluga Icon review

Lenovo A6000 Plus
The Lenovo A6000 Plus, which was launched in April this year, also proves to be a worthy competitor when it comes to battery performance. The smartphone with its 2300mAh battery was termed as ‘excellent’ in our reviews and the smartphone scored 9/10 for battery life. In our in-house tests, the smartphone lasted 10 hours, 34 minutes, which again is more than enough to run for full day on a single charge with regular usage. The smartphone, which was launched at Rs. 7,499 can be grabbed at under Rs. 7,000 from select online retailers.

Lenovo A6000 Plus

Rs. 7499

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Much-needed boost to internal storage and RAM
  • Excellent battery life
  • Good design
  • Excellent value for money
  • 64-bit SoC
  • Bad
  • Camera is still average
  • Still no toughened glass
  • Vibe 2.0 UI could be improved
Read detailed Lenovo A6000 Plus review

Gionee Marathon M4
Gionee’s Marathon smartphones are known for their impressive battery life. While the Marathon M4launched at a little above Rs. 15,000, it can now be purchased at around Rs. 11,000. The smartphone’s 5000mAh battery can be stretched further using two power saver modes. This phone lasted a record-shattering 21 hours, 23 minutes in our video loop test. We were able to get through entire days of normal usage including a few games and videos and lots of 4G data usage with plenty of capacity to spare.

Gionee Marathon M4

Rs. 15499

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

  • Good
  • Record-breaking battery life
  • Feels well-built and solid
  • Decent photos in daylight
  • Smooth performance
  • Bad
  • Bulky and heavy
  • Low-resolution screen
  • Lots of UI quirks and mangled English
Read detailed Gionee Marathon M4 review

Obi Worldphone SF1
The brand new Obi Worldphone SF1, with its 3000mAh non-removable battery, also gave decent results in our tests. Priced at Rs. 14,000, the smartphone battery delivered 9 hours and 53 minutes in our video loop test. With regular use, we found ourselves easily pushing past a day’s worth of usage, which is good.

Obi Worldphone SF1

Rs. 13999

  • Design

  • Display

  • Software

  • Performance

  • Battery life

  • Camera

  • Value for money

[“Source-Gadgets”]

10 Big Technology Trends Likely to Emerge in 2016

10 Big Technology Trends Likely to Emerge in 2016

Predicting the future is a dangerous game. It’s easy to speculate and easier still to hope, but what we have to do is carefully look at all the promising developments we’ve seen in the recent past and then evaluate how we think they’ll keep going, and what else they’ll lead to. Some companies are kind enough to provide roadmaps and projections, but surprises can pop up out of anywhere, anytime.

We’ve looked at the state of tech and of the world at large to bring you our list of ten things we think will be significant in the world of personal technology in 2016. From global-scale trends that will shape politics and policy to the individual features of our next smartphones, there’s a lot to think about.

1) The death of the traditional desktop OS
With Microsoft taking full control of Windows 10 updates and doing whatever it can to push users to its latest OS, the traditional notion of the OS is dead in 2016. From forced updates to a dependency on being completely online and licenses tied to specific hardware, we’re heading into a world of subscriptions and service fees that can’t be avoided.

Google already pushes ChromeOS as a gateway to its own services, which are barely usable offline. A steady stream of minor updates will mean there’s no concept of a version number anymore – and your rapidly depleting data cap will make you wish Internet connectivity was better.

(Also see: FUP (Fair Usage Policy) Is an UFP (UnFair Policy))

broadband_test_dec15_ndtv.jpg2) Broadband becomes our lifeblood
You’re only as good as your Internet connection. The music and gaming industries have been quick to adopt streaming as a revenue model, and that means more pressure on your bandwidth limit. This year saw a plethora of music streaming services and 2016 could see the launch of even more – there is also some serious speculation that both Netflix and Amazon Prime Video will arrive in India. It doesn’t stop here.

Both Sony and Nvidia have made their intentions to stream video games to every device on the planet clear as well. Almost every game on PC, PS4, and Xbox One ships in an unfinished state on disc and requires massive updates before you even start playing. What this means is that you need to start upgrading your broadband connection before you upgrade your gadgets.

3) Hardware evolves and improves
Possibly the safest bet to make – 2016 is set to bring about some big changes on the hardware side of things – from televisions to smartphones to home Internet. Most televisions today use LED-backlit LCD panels, but LG brought OLED to the market in 2015 and more manufacturers, including Samsung, Haier and TCL, have announced plans to follow suit in 2016. OLED TVs use a thin, electrically charged organic film to emit light, and each pixel generates its own light. OLED TVs have many advantages, including lighter and thinner panels, deeper blacks, and wider viewing angles.

USB Type-C ports are also expected to become commonplace on smartphones and PCs, and will finally make it easier to plug your phone into its data cable or charger. On the connectivity front, 4G network capabilities will grow, and more operators will be available for to users in India to choose from, and 5G will begin trials in some parts of the world.

More phones will have high-resolution screens, and more flagship smartphones will have to step up to at least Quad-HD or 4K resolution. Finally, we hope to see e-SIM cards also make an appearance. This would mean that it would no longer be necessary to insert a different SIM card into your phone for different operators; all you’d have to do is select the network of your choosing.

4) Devices may take on fresh new shapes
Smartphones, tablets and computers in 2016 will adopt new form factors. Samsung is expected to finally bring its foldable screens to market, which will allow devices to be truly flexible. It may be possible to fold your huge smartphone and put it away in your pocket, or bend it just as much as you like. Curved screens are also expected to become more common. This will allow for more variety in the designs and form factors of our devices.

We can expect smartphones in 2016 to keep getting slimmer. Reports have already emerged that theiPhone 7 will be 1mm slimmer by ditching the 3.5mm socket, and Android manufacturers will surely follow suit. There is an increasing demand for slimmer phones, and manufacturers will do all they can to cater to it.

samsung_curved_screen_samsung.jpg5) Virtual reality and augmented reality will still be just around the corner
Virtual and augmented reality experiences are closer than ever, but as far as mainstream acceptance is concerned, they’re still going to be just beyond the reach of most of us. Ever since the Oculus Rift first burst onto the scene with its blockbuster Kickstarter fundraiser, we’ve tried out a number of different headsets, and the frontrunners today are essentially down to the Oculus Rift, the HTC Vive, and thePlayStation VR.

These are all supposed to launch in 2016, though the requirements in terms of space, compatible hardware, and high pricing means that none of them are going to be accessible to most people. Augmented reality, in the form of Microsoft’s Hololens for example, is a different kind of experience – instead of immersing yourself in the virtual world, augmented reality is about bringing virtual elements into the real world. Google Glass is another example.

Hololens will be expensive, and like the leading VR solutions, it will not be relevant to the majority of people in 2016. Both VR and AR are very exciting technologies that are making huge strides forward, but there’s still going to be a little wait before they become truly mainstream.

xiaomi_manu_MIA2.jpg6) The ‘Make in India’ initiative will gain momentum
The Indian government’s initiative to make this country a global manufacturing hub is going to really explode on a big scale next year. The wheels are already in motion as over the past few months, smartphone makers including Xiaomi, Asus and Gionee have announced plans to assemble phones at Foxconn’s Sri City facility in Andhra Pradesh. Qualcomm too, recently put forward its program to encourage product and ecosystem creation for smartphones and the Internet of Things (IoT) across sectors like banking, healthcare, agriculture, wearables and smart cities. The initiative has also been noticed by the likes of Twitter, which has recently launched a special emoji to symbolise it.

There’s a mega event being scheduled by the government of India in Mumbai from February 13 to 18 called ‘Make in India Week’, which will highlight the people, policies and partnerships which are paving the way forward for a digital India.

7) The Internet of Things (IoT) is only going to get bigger
The Internet of Things (IoT) concept has been just that, a concept, but 2016 could be the year it goes mainstream. Chances are, you won’t even notice it. Gartner estimates nearly 6.4 billion connected devices in use globally, which would be a 30 percent jump from this year. These might not be actual devices that you have on your person, but still gather information about your habits in order to give you personalised experiences. For instance, the next time you step out to buy a train ticket, the automated ticket teller could already know your daily travel route and dispense the appropriate ticket without you having to do anything.

Smart devices have already started percolating into the Indian market. Cube 26’s Smart Bulb andPhilips’ Hue are two such examples, and we expect many more to arrive next year. The policy framework for IoT is still being laid out and India is aiming for a six percent share in this $300 billion global industry. In addition, Amazon Web Services has launched a cloud platform for IoT which helps devices with limited memory or battery life communicate with each other. Global bigwigs including Google, Intel, Qualcomm, Cisco, Vodafone and Samsung, to name a few, are all heavily invested in IoT and believe this is where the future of personal technology is heading.

samsung_gear_vr_samsung.jpg8) Privacy and security become political weapons against Internet freedom
As incidents of terrorism and violence occur, security and early detection become the topics that politicians most love to harp on. Right at this moment, multiple agencies in countries around the world are trying to force manufacturers to add backdoors to their hardware and software, reduce the strength of commonly used encryption standards (or ban them outright), spy on all kinds of communications, and bump up surveillance using the best technology available.

As private citizens, our lives will be impacted heavily by whatever results from these efforts. We might begin to see a world in which devices track you all the time whether you like it or not. It’s already tough enough to buy a SIM card, but France is trying to ban the Tor network, Kazakhstan wants to force all users to allow remote access to their devices, several countries want to restrict Internet access, and the upcoming US presidential election is already full of rhetoric about the Internet and what Silicon Valley should do.

9) Devices gain cognitive capabilities
Cognitive computing, machine learning, artificial intelligence and neural networks: all overlapping terms for the kind of advanced device behaviour we’re going to start seeing in 2016. Pretty soon, we’ll be able to expect our gadgets and accessories to learn about us and our environments in order to make specific, subjective decisions. Qualcomm will start shipping its flagship Snapdragon 820 processor, which it touts will be able to identify subjects in photographs along with lighting and composition in order to quickly adjust settings, amongst other things. There are even applications in security, such as malware pattern detection, and in natural user interfaces, such as speech and handwriting processing.

Over time, developers will be able to create all kinds of new experiences, and assistants like Siri will be able to interact naturally and deliver results to us depending on our schedules and preferences. This is not only going to be the next huge smartphone feature, it’s going to change all kinds of digital devices, starting in 2016.

internet_tree_pixabay.jpg10) The sharing economy’s troubles are far from over
By now, we’ve come to be familiar with Uber, Airbnb, and various other platforms that let us turn our skills, possessions and time into money. On the flipside, there are those which want to make our lives easier by outsourcing errands such as grocery shopping and food delivery. The two concepts work together, since there are people willing to pay for such conveniences, and people willing to earn by providing them. Sitting pretty in the middle, platforms take a cut and have very little to do other than manage supply and demand.

(Also see: Rocket Internet’s Rocky Flight in India)

The second half of this year has seen an explosion of such hyperlocal startups, focusing on specific tasks or pain points that they can help people overcome. We haven’t yet seen how well they will work and how long they will all last – but it stands to reason that 2016 will see a lot of consolidation as not all platforms which duplicate each-others’ functionality can hope to survive.

Customers who try these services and become used to them should be prepared to have them wind up in short order – especially if they’re providing unsustainable discounts. On the other hand, those which have built up their user bases will ease up on promotions and then you’ll have to decide whether they’re worth the expense.

[“Source-Gadgets”]