How to force quit apps on a Chromebook

chrome-task-manager.jpg

Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET

When things go sideways with Windows, there’s Ctrl-Alt-Delete to get you to the Task Manager where you can investigate what’s causing the problem and end any unresponsive apps. When something goes wrong on a Mac, there’s Command-Option-Escape to call up the Force Quit Applications window. But when an app freezes or starts acting sluggish on a Chromebook, where do you turn? Is there a keyboard shortcut that can put an end to your troubles?

I have good news for Chromebook users. There is such a keyboard shortcut, and it’s quite simple. When something is amiss on your Chromebook and you need to force quit an app, hit Shift-Escape. This keyboard shortcut calls up Chrome’s Task Manager. Since Chrome apps are the only kinds of apps that a Chromebook runs, Chrome’s Task Manager is the only task manager you need on a Chromebook. Just click on the app that’s giving you problems and hit the End Process button.

At the top of the Task Manager, you’ll see Chrome listed. You can’t select it and force quit it because Chrome OS isn’t anything more than the Chrome browser with a bit of window dressing, which means that quitting Chrome would amount to shutting down your Chromebook. If you are experiencing an issue that force quitting an app can’t solve, then shut down your Chromebook by clicking the system tray in the bottom-right corner of your display and then clicking the power button. Or if you’re really stuck, hold down the power button for 3 seconds to power down your system.

For more tips, learn how to print from a Chromebook, run Windows programs on a Chromebook and the best way to use Dropbox on a Chromebook.

[“Source-cnet”]

UK cities nowhere in sight in world’s quality of living rankings

Vienna, Austria

Vienna’s rents and public transport costs are cheap compared with other western capitals CREDIT: REX

Vienna, Austria’s grand capital on the Danube river, has topped consulting firm Mercer’s list of cities offering the highest quality of life for the eighth year in a row, while Baghdad is again considered the worst place to live.

Meanwhile London, together with other global centres Paris, Tokyo and New York City did not even make the top 30, lagging behind most big German, Scandinavian, Canadian, New Zealand and Australian cities. The England and UK capital ranked 40th, two spots behind its French counterpart.

The survey of 231 cities helps companies and organisations determine compensation and hardship allowances for international staff. It uses dozens of criteria such as political stability, health care, education, crime, recreation and transport.

Singapore was the highest ranked Asian city, at 25 while 29th-placed San Francisco was the United States’ highest entry. Top of the list in Africa was South Africa’s Durban at 87.

Top five cities by region
Top five cities by region

Vienna’s 1.8 million inhabitants benefit from the city’s cafe culture and museums, theatres and operas. Rents and public transport costs in the city, whose architecture is marked by its past as the centre of the Habsburg empire, are cheap compared with other western capitals.

Switzerland’s Zurich, New Zealand’s Auckland, Germany’s Munich and Canada’s Vancouver followed Vienna in the top five of most pleasant cities to live in.

Two bombs have exploded in a busy market area in central Baghdad
A busy market area in central Baghdad after an explosion  CREDIT: AFP

Baghdad was again ranked lowest in the world. Waves of sectarian violence have swept through the Iraqi capital since the US-led invasion in 2003.

Six years into Syria’s bloody war, Damascus was ranked seventh from bottom, with Bangui in the Central African Republic, Yemeni capital Sanaa, Haiti’s Port-au-Prince, Sudan’s Khartoum and Chad’s N’Djamena filling out the end of the list.

 

Top ten cities

  1. Vienna (Austria)
  2. Zurich (Switzerland)
  3. Auckland (New Zealand)
  4. Munich (Germany)
  5. Vancouver (Canada)
  6. Dusseldorf (Germany)
  7. Frankfurt (Germany)
  8. Geneva (Switzerland)
  9. Copenhagen (Denmark)
  10. Basel (Switzerland) and Sydney (Australia)

Bottom ten cities

231. Baghdad (Iraq)

230. Bangui (Central African Republic)

229. Sana’a (Yemen)

228. Port au Prince (Haiti)

227. Khartoum (Sudan)

226. N’djamena (Chad)

225. Damascus (Syria)

224. Brazzaville (Congo)

223. Kinshasa (Democratic Rep. of the Congo_

222. Conakry Guinea

UK ranking

40. London

45. Edinburgh

53. Birmingham and Glasgow

58. Aberdeen

[“Source-“]

How to tackle bro-culture in tech startups

Uber on mobile phone

Susan Fowler, an engineer who used to work at Uber, says the company prioritised bro-code over her complaints. Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters

March is Women’s History Month and if you’re a journalist writing about women and work, your inbox will be inundated with press releases from corporates. They all want to tell you about the amazing programme they run for women, the targets they have set, or the new female board member they have just appointed. If you believed everything you were told you would think the average workplace was female nirvana. And then you read a blog post like the recent one from Susan Fowler, an engineer who used to work at Uber, and you realise how far there is still to go.

In case you missed it, last month Fowler blogged about why she left the tech giant. She explained that despite registering complaints about sexual harassment and discrimination, the company prioritised bro-code over behaviour. According to Fowler, reporting any sexual harassment issues resulted in her being told that either she was overreacting or that the man in question was a high performer so his behaviour would be ignored.

As a response to this, Uber opened an investigation, with its CEO, Travis Kalanick, claiming he wants justice for everyone at the company. Perhaps it’s just me but his statement has the ring of defensiveness about it. Whatever the results of the review, it’s important to remember that Uber is not alone is this behaviour. There are a good many tech firms currently counting the number of women in their engineering teams and worrying that they might be next. As Sarah Lacy, founder of Pando Daily, tells Vox, the culture of Silicon Valley and the entire tech industry has changed.

The sort of bro culture seen at Uber recently might be expected in banking, a hangover from the Wolf of Wall Street days, but there’s an assumption that tech companies should be more enlightened. However, as more money has poured into tech startups, the culture has changed. The alpha male bro is reigning, and it’s not good for women.

In the spirit of generosity, here is some advice for tech companies. If you’re concerned that your organisation is about to be submerged by a sexual harassment scandal, this is what you should do:

  • Ask your female employees to tell you honestly what it’s like to work there. Whether you like their response or not, believe them. Don’t try to deny it, don’t try to explain it, and definitely don’t try to tell the women they have misunderstood the situation. Accept it and start to think about how you can fix it.
  • Institute a zero-tolerance policy to any form of sexual harassment or discrimination. In an ideal world this would have been the status quo for every company, but we know it’s not.
  • Take a serious look at your HR team. All too often HR is a second consideration for startups, something they have to do as they grow and when the founders get bored of managing people. Look at how you treat your HR team, do you listen to them? If not, start. Equally, look at how they behave with you. Do they tell you honestly what’s happening in the company? Are they more concerned with minimising issues than dealing with them? If you don’t have a HR director who will happily tell you when you’re wrong, then you need a different one.
  • Write to all the women who have previously worked for you and ask them for their help. Ask them to be honest about what working in your company was like, why they left and what they would change. Pay them to do this.
  • Grow with your business. Maybe you started a tech company because you had a great idea, thought it would be fun to be an entrepreneur and set your own rules. That’s great but, like humans, companies eventually have to grow up.

Looking for a job? Browse Guardian Jobs or sign up to Guardian Careers for the latest job vacancies and career advice

[“Source-theguardian”]

Iron Fist actor defends series after wave of negative reviews

Iron Fist’s Finn Jones has come to the defense of the newest Netflix and Marvel series after it received numerous negative reviews.

Jones told Metro that shows like Iron Fist are not made for critics,” but are designed entirely for the fans. As such, the lower scores and bad reviews the show has received from critics are coming from people who weren’t fans going into it, according to the actor.

“I also think some of the reviews we saw were seeing the show through a very specific lens, and I think when the fans of the Marvel Netflix world and fans of the comic books view the show through the lens of just wanting to enjoy a superhero show, then they will really enjoy what they see,” Jones said.

Jones’ comments have caught the ire of both critics and fans online who argued over the weekend that claiming enthusiasts couldn’t watch a show through a critical lens was insulting. Likewise, critics argued they could be enthusiasts going into a series, but that didn’t deter them from giving their honest opinions during reviews.

Jones added that he believes Iron Fist stands on its own and is just as good as other series in Marvel and Netflix’s Defenders franchise. In comparison, however, both Luke Cage and Jessica Jones debuted to mostly positive reviews, and even Daredevil managed to impress both critics and fans.

This isn’t the first time that someone has used the “it’s made for fans, not critics” defense, either. When Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice was released, Amy Adams claimed that the movie wasn’t made for critics and people needed to keep that in perspective.

“I know that Zack doesn’t make the movies, and none of us are making the movies for the critics, so to speak, you can’t go into it from that perspective,” Adams told Yahoo! Movies. “So, I know we really hope the fans like it, and so far the reaction’s been really positive on that front.”

Suicide Squad’s Cara Delevingne also used the defense while talking about the DC and Warner Bros. film that was also panned by critics.

“The critics have been absolutely horrific. They’re really, really horrible. You know, I just don’t think they like superhero movies,” Delevingne told Reuters. “It doesn’t really matter what the critics say at the end of the day, it’s the fans that we made this movie for.”

We’ll see if Iron Fist lives up to fans expectations on March 17 when the season is released in its entirety on Netflix.